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#16 John Dolva

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 03:45 PM

http://alcoholism.ab...a/blwhatis1.htm
http://alcoholism.ab...a/blwhatis1.htm

I don't think I'm an alcoholic, however, I do consume alcohol on a regular basis (too often, according to guidelines). I often wonder where do you draw the line, when it comes to defining an alcoholic?

Is one an alcoholic when one can not cope with work and family due to drinking? Probably.
Is one an alcoholic if one drinks over 20-30 portions of alcohol a week, but does it in a social manner and copes well with work and social life? Probably not.

To me those are important questions, I fear it is an illness that can creep up on you, if you are not alert. I am at risk.

I have family and friends who are alcoholics, so I've seen what the disease can do. I hope there'll be some better ways to deal with this disease in the future, the current methods are not adequate imo.

We have our fair share of this problem here in Finland:


http://www.lfhk.cuni.....n Finland.ppt


If you say you are at risk then it must be taken very seriously. My immediate recommendations is the beginning of the buiding of a support network plus (and Im not kidding) find time to have a series of three or so real sauna eves, with a little bit of vodka if you have to, plus a refreshing after meal of ryvita and salted fish, dill perhaps, and water or a natural fruit additive. Then a good sleep. Consider other things along that line as well. Find and reduce pressures. It's important to consider the ultimate physical and mental effects and make time for something nourishing in all spheres.

#17 John Dolva

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 07:29 AM

Some more thoughts, Antti. You've shared something thats no doubt thoughts in many minds. It is life giving, not just to you, thank you for sharing!

You are very wise in saying clearly you are at risk.
You will find unexpected support,
and you will find unexpected dilemmas to resolve.

To begin working on it is fantastic.

One doesn't HAVE to do it all at once. That's why I say don't exclude alcohol immediately from your life, in your situation, if at all, you must feel free.

The changes to cope with can be just as destructive as keeping on a risky path. What I am suggesting is gradually make the path LESS risky, and deal with each issue in the thoughtful and calm manner that you are so capable of.
____________________

In the meantime, consider two important (in fact vital ) organs, your liver. your brain and the whole neural network.

Feed them with vitalising elements, food, joy, sharing, giving, all the nutrition that these organs need to sustain a defence against this, quite simply, toxic substance.

And last but not least, and dont let it feel like a burden that you have to carry, it can just as easily be an act of unburdening, of loving, don't forget (as Steve pointed out) those who truly love you, and that you love.

re support network: let it include an impartial councellor of sorts, whatever suits you.

#18 Antti Hynonen

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 09:27 AM

Some more thoughts, Antti. You've shared something thats no doubt thoughts in many minds. It is life giving, not just to you, thank you for sharing!

You are very wise in saying clearly you are at risk.
You will find unexpected support,
and you will find unexpected dilemmas to resolve.

To begin working on it is fantastic.

One doesn't HAVE to do it all at once. That's why I say don't exclude alcohol immediately from your life, in your situation, if at all, you must feel free.

The changes to cope with can be just as destructive as keeping on a risky path. What I am suggesting is gradually make the path LESS risky, and deal with each issue in the thoughtful and calm manner that you are so capable of.
____________________

In the meantime, consider two important (in fact vital ) organs, your liver. your brain and the whole neural network.

Feed them with vitalising elements, food, joy, sharing, giving, all the nutrition that these organs need to sustain a defence against this, quite simply, toxic substance.

And last but not least, and dont let it feel like a burden that you have to carry, it can just as easily be an act of unburdening, of loving, don't forget (as Steve pointed out) those who truly love you, and that you love.

re support network: let it include an impartial councellor of sorts, whatever suits you.


John,
Thanks for your comments. I go through spurts (I can't say binges) and then I'm without a drink for several days. I think my habit is a result of stress, personal problems and lack of sleep/rest.

I will try some of your advice over my upcoming break.

#19 David G. Healy

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 08:43 AM

Some more thoughts, Antti. You've shared something thats no doubt thoughts in many minds. It is life giving, not just to you, thank you for sharing!

You are very wise in saying clearly you are at risk.
You will find unexpected support,
and you will find unexpected dilemmas to resolve.

To begin working on it is fantastic.

One doesn't HAVE to do it all at once. That's why I say don't exclude alcohol immediately from your life, in your situation, if at all, you must feel free.

The changes to cope with can be just as destructive as keeping on a risky path. What I am suggesting is gradually make the path LESS risky, and deal with each issue in the thoughtful and calm manner that you are so capable of.
____________________

In the meantime, consider two important (in fact vital ) organs, your liver. your brain and the whole neural network.

Feed them with vitalising elements, food, joy, sharing, giving, all the nutrition that these organs need to sustain a defence against this, quite simply, toxic substance.

And last but not least, and dont let it feel like a burden that you have to carry, it can just as easily be an act of unburdening, of loving, don't forget (as Steve pointed out) those who truly love you, and that you love.

re support network: let it include an impartial councellor of sorts, whatever suits you.


John,
Thanks for your comments. I go through spurts (I can't say binges) and then I'm without a drink for several days. I think my habit is a result of stress, personal problems and lack of sleep/rest.

I will try some of your advice over my upcoming break.


The Twenty Questions to help one determine
IF he/she has a problem with ALCOHOL.

The 20 Questions

Take this 20 question test to help you decide whether or not you are an alcoholic.

Answer YES or NO to the following questions.

1. Do you lose time from work due to drinking?
YES __ NO __

2. Is drinking making your home life unhappy?
YES __ NO __

3. Do you drink because you are shy with other people?
YES __ NO __

4. Is your drinking affecting your reputation?
YES __ NO __

5. Have you ever felt remorse after drinking?
YES __ NO __

6. Have you ever got into financial difficulties as a result of drinking?
YES __ NO __

7. Do you turn to lower companions and an inferior environment when drinking?
YES __ NO __

8. Does your drinking make you careless of your family’s welfare?
YES __ NO __

9. Has your ambition decreased since drinking?
YES __ NO __

10. Do you crave a drink at a definite time?
YES __ NO __

11. Do you want a drink the next morning?
YES __ NO __

12. Does drinking cause you to have difficulty in sleeping?
YES __ NO __

13. Has your efficiency decreased since drinking?
YES __ NO __

14. Is drinking jeopardizing your job or business?
YES __ NO __

15. Do you drink to escape from worries or trouble?

YES __ NO __

16. Do you drink alone?
YES __ NO __

17. Have you ever had a complete loss of memory as a result of drinking?
YES __ NO __

18. Has your physician ever treated you for drinking?
YES __ NO __

19. Do you drink to build up your self-confidence?
YES __ NO __

20. Have you ever been to a hospital or institution because of drinking?
YES __ NO __

What's your score?

If you have answered YES to any one of the questions, there is a definite warning that you may be an alcoholic.

If you have answered YES to any two, the chances are that you are an alcoholic.

If you answered YES to three or more, you are definitely an alcoholic.

(The test questions are used at Johns Hopkins University Hospital, Baltimore, MD, in deciding whether or not a patient is an alcoholic).

It's been heard: IF you simply THINK you have a problem with alcohol, you HAVE a problem with alcohol!

#20 John Simkin

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 11:25 AM

The Twenty Questions to help one determine
IF he/she has a problem with ALCOHOL.

The 20 Questions

Take this 20 question test to help you decide whether or not you are an alcoholic.

Answer YES or NO to the following questions.

1. Do you lose time from work due to drinking?
YES __ NO __

2. Is drinking making your home life unhappy?
YES __ NO __

3. Do you drink because you are shy with other people?
YES __ NO __

4. Is your drinking affecting your reputation?
YES __ NO __

5. Have you ever felt remorse after drinking?
YES __ NO __

6. Have you ever got into financial difficulties as a result of drinking?
YES __ NO __

7. Do you turn to lower companions and an inferior environment when drinking?
YES __ NO __

8. Does your drinking make you careless of your family’s welfare?
YES __ NO __

9. Has your ambition decreased since drinking?
YES __ NO __

10. Do you crave a drink at a definite time?
YES __ NO __

11. Do you want a drink the next morning?
YES __ NO __

12. Does drinking cause you to have difficulty in sleeping?
YES __ NO __

13. Has your efficiency decreased since drinking?
YES __ NO __

14. Is drinking jeopardizing your job or business?
YES __ NO __

15. Do you drink to escape from worries or trouble?

YES __ NO __

16. Do you drink alone?
YES __ NO __

17. Have you ever had a complete loss of memory as a result of drinking?
YES __ NO __

18. Has your physician ever treated you for drinking?
YES __ NO __

19. Do you drink to build up your self-confidence?
YES __ NO __

20. Have you ever been to a hospital or institution because of drinking?
YES __ NO __

What's your score?

If you have answered YES to any one of the questions, there is a definite warning that you may be an alcoholic.

If you have answered YES to any two, the chances are that you are an alcoholic.

If you answered YES to three or more, you are definitely an alcoholic.

(The test questions are used at Johns Hopkins University Hospital, Baltimore, MD, in deciding whether or not a patient is an alcoholic).

It's been heard: IF you simply THINK you have a problem with alcohol, you HAVE a problem with alcohol!


Thank you for that David. As a teacher I found that 3 is an important factor in why young people drink. When I was a teenager I used to drink to give myself confidence. Lucky for me I was working with a man named Bob Clarke, who was in his early 30s. He had just lost his only child and my father had been killed in a road accident. Bob became my surrogate father and was always around to give me great advice.

Bob warned me the dangers of getting drunk. He pointed out that if drinking gave me confidence, there was a danger that I would always resort to it everytime I had to face a stressful situation. Bob then gave me the most important advice that I have ever received. It in fact changed my personality. Bob said the best way of dealing with shyness in social situations was to concentrate on helping the person you are dealing with to increase their level of self-confidence. I found it worked. The reason being is that you forget about your own problems. What is more, you are making the other person feel better about themselves. It is a great way of making friends (and lovers). It has also helped me not to become an alcoholic.

#21 David G. Healy

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 11:27 PM

The Twenty Questions to help one determine
IF he/she has a problem with ALCOHOL.

The 20 Questions

Take this 20 question test to help you decide whether or not you are an alcoholic.

Answer YES or NO to the following questions.

1. Do you lose time from work due to drinking?
YES __ NO __

2. Is drinking making your home life unhappy?
YES __ NO __

3. Do you drink because you are shy with other people?
YES __ NO __

4. Is your drinking affecting your reputation?
YES __ NO __

5. Have you ever felt remorse after drinking?
YES __ NO __

6. Have you ever got into financial difficulties as a result of drinking?
YES __ NO __

7. Do you turn to lower companions and an inferior environment when drinking?
YES __ NO __

8. Does your drinking make you careless of your family’s welfare?
YES __ NO __

9. Has your ambition decreased since drinking?
YES __ NO __

10. Do you crave a drink at a definite time?
YES __ NO __

11. Do you want a drink the next morning?
YES __ NO __

12. Does drinking cause you to have difficulty in sleeping?
YES __ NO __

13. Has your efficiency decreased since drinking?
YES __ NO __

14. Is drinking jeopardizing your job or business?
YES __ NO __

15. Do you drink to escape from worries or trouble?

YES __ NO __

16. Do you drink alone?
YES __ NO __

17. Have you ever had a complete loss of memory as a result of drinking?
YES __ NO __

18. Has your physician ever treated you for drinking?
YES __ NO __

19. Do you drink to build up your self-confidence?
YES __ NO __

20. Have you ever been to a hospital or institution because of drinking?
YES __ NO __

What's your score?

If you have answered YES to any one of the questions, there is a definite warning that you may be an alcoholic.

If you have answered YES to any two, the chances are that you are an alcoholic.

If you answered YES to three or more, you are definitely an alcoholic.

(The test questions are used at Johns Hopkins University Hospital, Baltimore, MD, in deciding whether or not a patient is an alcoholic).

It's been heard: IF you simply THINK you have a problem with alcohol, you HAVE a problem with alcohol!


Thank you for that David. As a teacher I found that 3 is an important factor in why young people drink. When I was a teenager I used to drink to give myself confidence. Lucky for me I was working with a man named Bob Clarke, who was in his early 30s. He had just lost his only child and my father had been killed in a road accident. Bob became my surrogate father and was always around to give me great advice.

Bob warned me the dangers of getting drunk. He pointed out that if drinking gave me confidence, there was a danger that I would always resort to it everytime I had to face a stressful situation. Bob then gave me the most important advice that I have ever received. It in fact changed my personality. Bob said the best way of dealing with shyness in social situations was to concentrate on helping the person you are dealing with to increase their level of self-confidence. I found it worked. The reason being is that you forget about your own problems. What is more, you are making the other person feel better about themselves. It is a great way of making friends (and lovers). It has also helped me not to become an alcoholic.


You're welcome, John.... If one is so inclined a simple reading of Alcoholics Anonymous Big Book goes into much detail concerning the ravages of alcoholism AND a way out. The book clearly defines *problem* drinking as opposed to *alcoholic* drinking. (one needs only google "Alcoholics Anonymous")

Alcoholics Anonymous does NOT claim to be the last word in *alcoholic* drinking and the problems that surround the disease. The program has worked for 3+ million people (worldwide) since 1935. Not a bad track record for folks that were seemingly on the road to institutions of various stripe, insanity or death.

Edited by David G. Healy, 11 June 2009 - 11:33 PM.


#22 Andy Walker

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 11:56 AM

Alcohol is the world’s favourite drug refined over thousands of years and presented in a variety of delicious forms. None of these forms however disguise the fact that it is a slow poison and a slow poison that if taken too regularly will cause liver collapse and a very painful death.
I would contend that a majority of the population of my country drink to an excess that would result in most doctors classifying them as alcoholics. If you doubt this I suggest you go ‘dry’ for a period of time – say a few weeks – and observe the behaviour and values of those around you. There is indeed a silent conspiracy to belittle the dangers of drink and a quite loud one which pressures you to join in the drinking and thus justify the continued behaviour of those around you. There are indeed a lot more alcoholics around than many of us would care to admit.

Alcoholism is an addiction which presents itself as a coping strategy. The first step for an alcoholic is to acknowledge the truth in this statement. Thus I see no value in arguments expressed here that it is unsatisfactory lives, relationships or even poor government which ‘cause’ alcoholism. From this acknowledgement progress is possible. It’s an addiction and you’ve got it.

Drying out is difficult. Even those of us who regards ourselves as ‘social drinkers’ (denial!) may struggle with withdrawal symptoms when they attempt to stop drinking. The problem with withdrawal is that at every point the drinker knows that the horrible symptoms of withdrawal can be terminated at any time with another drink. If you return to the drink after detox then the withdrawal symptoms you experience next time will be worse and more prolonged. King Booze does not give up on his subjects without a prolonged struggle.

The established treatment for alcoholics has followed closely the teaching of Jung. Jung almost despairing of the middle aged alcoholic recidivists that he treated concluded that the only thing that could possibly shake his patients out of their behaviour was some sort of religious or spiritual conversion. Although this approach undoubtedly works I would contend that it is probably not for everyone.

If you are worried about your drinking then you already have a problem – acknowledge it and most importantly acknowledge it to someone else – then write down a list of reasons why you’d like to stop (they will be powerful!). Keep this document somewhere safe where you can refer to it when you are feeling like weakening. Do not detox alone or without medical help. If you have been even a moderately heavy drinker going ‘cold turkey’ can be extremely dangerous – seek medical help as detox though not easy doesn’t have to be agony. Make sure you have someone you can confide in as you go through the process.

#23 David G. Healy

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 10:19 PM

Alcohol is the world’s favourite drug refined over thousands of years and presented in a variety of delicious forms. None of these forms however disguise the fact that it is a slow poison and a slow poison that if taken too regularly will cause liver collapse and a very painful death.
I would contend that a majority of the population of my country drink to an excess that would result in most doctors classifying them as alcoholics. If you doubt this I suggest you go ‘dry’ for a period of time – say a few weeks – and observe the behaviour and values of those around you. There is indeed a silent conspiracy to belittle the dangers of drink and a quite loud one which pressures you to join in the drinking and thus justify the continued behaviour of those around you. There are indeed a lot more alcoholics around than many of us would care to admit.

Alcoholism is an addiction which presents itself as a coping strategy. The first step for an alcoholic is to acknowledge the truth in this statement. Thus I see no value in arguments expressed here that it is unsatisfactory lives, relationships or even poor government which ‘cause’ alcoholism. From this acknowledgement progress is possible. It’s an addiction and you’ve got it.

Drying out is difficult. Even those of us who regards ourselves as ‘social drinkers’ (denial!) may struggle with withdrawal symptoms when they attempt to stop drinking. The problem with withdrawal is that at every point the drinker knows that the horrible symptoms of withdrawal can be terminated at any time with another drink. If you return to the drink after detox then the withdrawal symptoms you experience next time will be worse and more prolonged. King Booze does not give up on his subjects without a prolonged struggle.

The established treatment for alcoholics has followed closely the teaching of Jung. Jung almost despairing of the middle aged alcoholic recidivists that he treated concluded that the only thing that could possibly shake his patients out of their behaviour was some sort of religious or spiritual conversion. Although this approach undoubtedly works I would contend that it is probably not for everyone.

If you are worried about your drinking then you already have a problem – acknowledge it and most importantly acknowledge it to someone else – then write down a list of reasons why you’d like to stop (they will be powerful!). Keep this document somewhere safe where you can refer to it when you are feeling like weakening. Do not detox alone or without medical help. If you have been even a moderately heavy drinker going ‘cold turkey’ can be extremely dangerous – seek medical help as detox though not easy doesn’t have to be agony. Make sure you have someone you can confide in as you go through the process.


complete agreement, thank you Andy Walker...

#24 John Dolva

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 05:43 AM

This is indeed the stark reality.

Unfortunately, it's a lot to deal with for the addict.

Generally, the addict has no idea of any of this. Addiction is a very self centered sickness in many ways. The drive stems from within, the act of partaking, the justifications, the consequences, the denial, ... all stem from within, and dismantling this tangled web, which usually has been built up over a long time, ultimately leads to a look at self.

The Admission leads to a series of events that can be very difficult to deal with because of this long formed attachment to what is basically a life built on a lie. There will always be the ''me'' that knows better and the simplest way to deal with it is to surrender to it again and again. The proper way of dealing with it can have, to the addict, horrifying self realisations.

_________________

The inclusion in ones life at this point of at least one non pre judiced guide, a Friend in the Truest sense (who sometimes must deal out Tough Love). This can seldom be someone embroiled somehow in the web. In AA it is found in the person of what is called a Sponsor, who, not lightly, accepts to take on the task. For the sponsor it is a very good way to stay on the path not just for the active addict. Someone who over time and repeated busts, is always there, even at 4am or so, never to support any resumption of active addiction, but accept it non judgementally (been there done that) and pray or have faith that the addict with proper guidance, again can come to own the addiction and proceed to such a full realisation as Andy so harshly but quite simply ''telling it as it is'' has done.

Its good to hear it, to read it and ponder upon it.

Ultimately, for the process to succeed, the one who ultimately is responsible for everything, the addict, must face this truth.

The path to this fill realisation, which is necessarily coupled with a self realisation, can be arduous.

In AA one will find friends, (perhaps for the first time?) The true friend amongst the ''friends'' is the one who is steadfast through the whole process, helping to turn the self loathing, which ultimately raises its head as an enemy, into a liberation.

#25 John Dolva

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 08:56 AM

http://educationforu...view=getnewpost (link to related topic)
________________________

''Tough Love'' ...

... is an important element that loved ones and the addict at times must deal with.

Many Parents and friends accomodate the addict out of love. Understandable, but for the addict not so good at times. There are also resources for the people who care about the addict. AA groupings for example, for the non addict.

In this the message is often one of the hardest for a Parent to take. Kick the addict out and grieve, and pray, and hope. Refuse any support that is not Very Clearly aimed at the acting seeking help themselves. Support that fully, and resume Tough Love if needed.

This, while very hard on the addict, can, and in many instances does, lead to an owning of the addiction and the path to salvation taken. The addict then realises who truly loves them, and they in turn grow to value their true selves, which is so important.

#26 David G. Healy

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 04:52 PM

http://educationforu...view=getnewpost (link to related topic)
________________________

''Tough Love'' ...

... is an important element that loved ones and the addict at times must deal with.

Many Parents and friends accomodate the addict out of love. Understandable, but for the addict not so good at times. There are also resources for the people who care about the addict. AA groupings for example, for the non addict.

In this the message is often one of the hardest for a Parent to take. Kick the addict out and grieve, and pray, and hope. Refuse any support that is not Very Clearly aimed at the acting seeking help themselves. Support that fully, and resume Tough Love if needed.

This, while very hard on the addict, can, and in many instances does, lead to an owning of the addiction and the path to salvation taken. The addict then realises who truly loves them, and they in turn grow to value their true selves, which is so important.


worldwide link(s) for those pondering the question, 'do I need help':

http://www.na.org (Narcotics Anonymous)

for the alcoholic:

http://www.aa.org (Alcoholics Anonymous)

Help is a phone call away! Nearly anywhere in the world!

Edited by David G. Healy, 13 June 2009 - 05:00 PM.


#27 Pamela Brown

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 05:33 PM

It is said that some people have addictive personality and are therefore prone to things like alcoholism. Do you agree?

One of the friends of my wife is an alcoholic. Over the last few years Judith had many conversations with her about her drinking problem. She claimed that the reason she needed to be drunk was that she did not enjoy being sober. I could see the logic of that. Her life was pretty bad. She had endured two unhappy marriages and had serious problems with her children. It was a vicious circle. The drinking caused problems with her relationships and this in turn caused her to get drunk.

When I was young I used to enjoy gambling on horses and greyhounds. It never got out of control but I feared it would happen and eventually decided to give up the hobby. The main reason for this was that I was in the company of people who were compulsive gamblers. Some of these men were highly intelligent and it was frightening to watch them lose control. Two of these men ended up in prison and several lost their homes and families.

Although I do not have an addictive personality I used to get obsessional about things. In fact, it is a major strength and is connected to the successes that I have had in life. For example, Judith claimed, probably rightly, that I am a workaholic. My fear in the past is that this obsession would become an addiction. I no longer fear this as I feel too old to develop an addictive personality. I feel that the strength of the drive is important and as we get older these drives become weaker.


Well said, John.

Alcoholism is a disease that is chronic, progressive and fatal. While all the questions are valuable in assessing one's interactions (or, dare I say it, relationship) with alcohol, the most telling to me seems to be that of abstinence. If one can stop all consumption for a period of 30 days while being more-or-less comfortable about it, they are probably not an alcoholic. At that point, any drinking issues per se (such as binging or just regularly tying-one-on) can be dealt with at that level.

If one cannot go 30 days comfortably without alcohol, one is probably an alcoholic. There are two levels -- the first is more an emotional obsession (though that doesn't quite explain it) One is bereft of pleasure if they cannot drink. They are theoretically capable of stopping but are miserable when they do (and make others miserable -- dry drunk it is called). If one is at this level, run to AA and consider treatment. This was where I was 34 years ago tomorrow. I went to outpatient treatment for a month and it saved my life.

The final stages of alcoholism are physical; the person cannot (and should not) stop drinking on their own because they are physically addicted. Anyone at this stage should (hit bottom first) run to a hospital and explain their circumstances and ask for help while they dry out and then go to AA. My first husband died of the ravages of this disease, complicated by the fact that he tried to stop drinking at the physical level on his own.

#28 John Dolva

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 06:13 AM

Yes, I was once in a similar situation. I was in fact ordered by a doctor not to stop drinking. I might suffer fatal consequences.

This is why I reiterate that this disease is very serious, and partly because of stigma issues, partly the ''I know best'', people in this situation must have input, which, in the way things are set up, is often the last thing an active addict, or dry drunk too, seeks.

The situation must be approached with compassion where the addict can somehow begin to value life more than oblivion.

Education is important.

Treatment options are important.

Don't just consult a doctor, consult widely, and particularly with addicts (sober, in recovery, not dry drunks) as to their experiences. The input varies and at times professionals in the field know only what they have read. A Doctor who is him/her self an admitted and recovering addict is ideal.

But in emergency situations, certainly, recognise them and deal accordingly and timely.

#29 Nathaniel Heidenheimer

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 10:56 PM

Somewhere it is written:
"You have a unique voice and intellect, there is something of the poet about you, and you were realy missed when you ceased posting a while back. " All of THAT reporting was accurate!

#30 John Dolva

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 04:28 AM

Thank you, Nathaniel, kind words. Anyway, as a resource for those who suffer from addictions, I think this has been a good topic, with much good input. (Certainly for me). I hadn't realised just how important, and just how difficult, dealing with Denial really is.

Denial seems such a natural reaction, yet so unproductive.

It strikes me that the environment one moves through should be one which in some nurturing way supports the opposite, and I think much of the world does in various ways, but particularly self help groupings where other equally affected persons can gather and share is probably the best on offer, where those who talk, walk the talk.

So, any addict of any sort, take heart. There is a way that leads to a good life. (As John Simkin pointed out one CAN take the correct road early with caring input to the formative mind.) It's never too late.




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