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Paul Trejo

Ron Lewis and his book, FLASHBACK: The Untold Story of Lee Harvey Oswald

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There is a thread on the front page of this forum regarding Michael Paine that Paul bumped.

Many thanks, Kathy. I found the link and I moved my discussion of Michael Paine to that thread.

This will preserve the current thread for Ron Lewis' book, "FLASHBACK", and his own, independent reference to resigned General Edwin Walker.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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The surprising value in Ron Lewis' book, FLASHBACK: The Untold Story of Lee Harvey Oswald (1993) is that without any prompting or ulterior motive -- without any attempt to impress any JFK researcher of any school -- Ron Lewis makes a positive, eye-witness, conversational linkage between Lee Harvey Oswald and Ex-General Edwin Walker.



This makes the account of Ron Lewis rare in JFK literature.



The same is true in Harry Dean's book, Crosstrails (1990), as well as our eBook, Harry Dean's Confessions (2013). Without any prompting or ulterior motive -- without any attempt to impress any JFK researcher of any school -- and actually in contradiction to most JFK researchers -- Harry Dean makes a positive, eye-witness, conversational linkage between Lee Harvey Oswald and Ex-General Edwin Walker.



Though there are few books that confirm their independent accounts of Lee Harvey Oswald and Ex-General Walker -- I want to highlight the fact that they confirm EACH OTHER, without even trying to do so.



Best regards,


--Paul Trejo


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you're right to also ask about Oswald's relationship with George De Mohrenschildt, an informer for the CIA, a rich playboy and oil company specialist, who "accidentally" befriended Lee Harvey Oswald in 1962.

The standard story is that the CIA asked George to monitor Lee Oswald, in exchange for connections to a lucrative oil development contract in Haiti. George's story is that he and his wife just "felt sorry" for Lee Harvey Oswald. Your new theory is that Lee Harvey Oswald was really handling George De Mohrenschildt, and not the reverse. If so, then Oswald might have lied to George, leading him on that he shot at Walker, when he really didn't.

It's interesting to think about -- but it's a shot in the dark. The evidence that we have in sworn testimony from multiple sources doesn't lead toward that. Here's the evidence:

(1) Oswald didn't tell George DM that he shot at Walker; nor did he hint at it or allude to it.

(2) George DM says he "guessed" it based on Oswald's stunned reaction when George made a joke about the Walker shooting in connection with Oswald's scoped rifle which Jeanne found in their closet while she was snooping around.

I think Lee Oswald really did try to kill Edwin Walker, as motivated by Dallas Liberals led by George DM, Volkmar Schmidt and Michael Paine. (I also believe Oswald rode to the shooting site in a car with one other shooter.)

When George DM was asked to re-appear before the HSCA, he wrote a book, "I'm A Patsy" and then he committed suicide. Some say he was murdered -- but that's unproven at best.

In that book, George DM also tells about the engineer's party in Dallas in which Volkmar Schmidt used psychological techniques on Lee Harvey Oswald, to get him to hate General Walker. However, George DM also lies here -- he says he can't remember the name of the person who worked on Oswald "for hours" in that way. That was a lie, because George had telephoned Volkmar only the week before. Instead, George said in his book that the amateur psychologist "might have been Jewish." (There we see fading shades of George's early work with the Third Reich.)

There was a reason for George DM to lie about Volkmar Schmidt -- Schmidt was George's last friend on this earth -- and even when he was near the end of his rope, he wouldn't hand his friend over to the HSCA.

But without the Full Truth, George DM's book was flat and no publisher wanted it. That's why, IMHO, George DM blew his own brains out.

Hi, Paul!

George de Mohrenschildt is a very interesting person. I'm not sure he was a German spy. It's the first thing for me that alerts. I'm not sure he committed suicide. I'm not sure about his book.

IMHO he possible was the key person in conspiracy and he was investigated not enough.

Edited by Vitali Zhuk

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I guess some long-timers like me, including some well-known names on a list-bot, feel a need to be be highly skeptical of any late-arriving claimant to have been a witness. After such a long time, the onus is on them to prove their bonfides. By the same token, I think we feel a need to wave a caution flag when the bonafides don't inspire confidence. You're free to believe whomever you want, but there is some value in consulting the perspective and wisdom of those have been at this for a long time. I can't think of any respected researcher who endorses him.

I don't wish to get involved in a time-consuming, multi-post, multi-page debate over many weeks. I first saw Lewis on a program hosted by James Earl Jones. I bought Flashback, looking for anything to corroborate it. Nothing. Nada. Nobody had ever heard of him. Worse still (and this is subjective), I just got the feeling, like Henry Lee said, of "something wrong."

I agree, very little sounded credible to me as well. In particular the above, or any notion that he shot at Walker, or tried to get him to hijack a plane to Cuba. Just for starters. And don't even get me started about Files. Does anyone but Wim , who paid LOTS of money for this bogus story, believe a word of that bs?

Dawn

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...I don't wish to get involved in a time-consuming, multi-post, multi-page debate over many weeks. I first saw Lewis on a program hosted by James Earl Jones. I bought Flashback, looking for anything to corroborate it. Nothing. Nada. Nobody had ever heard of him. Worse still (and this is subjective), I just got the feeling, like Henry Lee said, of "something wrong."

I agree, very little sounded credible to me as well. In particular the above, or any notion that he shot at Walker, or tried to get him to hijack a plane to Cuba. Just for starters. And don't even get me started about Files. Does anyone but Wim , who paid LOTS of money for this bogus story, believe a word of that bs?

Dawn

Well, Dawn, at least "very little" sounded credible to you. I also regard Ron Lewis' account as exaggerated -- much like the case of Judyth Vary Baker, who knew Lee Harvey Oswald for a few weeks in the summer of 1963, and exaggerated that into a historical epic.

Actually, Ron Lewis doesn't exaggerate as much as Judyth Baker. Actually, Ron's claims about Oswald are very modest -- and the harshest criticism I can find for his exaggerations is reserved for Ron's use of the term, "best friend" when he spoke of Oswald.

I think that Lee Harvey Oswald kept Ron Lewis at arm's distance -- but I also believe they had something in common -- both had undesirable Marine discharges. Also, both were (in Ron Lewis' opinion, based on the illusion Oswald was engaged in) supporters of Fidel Castro. It was stunning to Ron Lewis to learn that Oswald wasn't really a supporter of Fidel Castro, but that he was being used by Anti-Castro forces in a Fake FPCC.

All that Ron really claims is that he knew Lee Harvey Oswald for a few weeks in New Orleans during the summer of 1963. Is that so hard to believe?

As for the shooting at Walker -- it really happened, and I can't understand how CTers can believe that several people who hated Edwin Walker (like George de Mohrenschildt and Michael Paine) would somehow join with Walker to create this lie that Lee Harvey Oswald was his shooter.

That's what doesn't makes sense to me.

As for Stephen Roy, he probably didn't know that Oliver Stone found Ron Lewis to be credible, and made Ron Lewis into an advisor for his 1991 movie, JFK.

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo

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Hi, Paul!

George de Mohrenschildt is a very interesting person. I'm not sure he was a German spy. It's the first thing for me that alerts. I'm not sure he committed suicide. I'm not sure about his book.

IMHO he possible was the key person in conspiracy and he was investigated not enough.

Well, Vitali, once I decided to learn everything about George De Mohrenschildt (DM), I bought Bruce Campbell Adamson's 2-CD set of his decades of research.

Adamson tried his best to make George DM into a JFK plotter, or a CIA plotter -- but couldn't finalize the argument. Still, Adamson completely scoured the life of George DM.

George DM was an opportunist. Born into an Aristocratic family in Belarus, he was quickly pauperized by Stalin. Naturally he supported the Nazi reaction for a while, hopeful that he could get his family fortune back -- but they all failed. His family then came to America, and tried to put all that behind them. His older brother did rather well. George himself became a Professor of oil exploration, and he was on track to become a millionaire at this game.

But it was not to be.

While in Dallas, George made a deal with the CIA to babysit Lee Harvey Oswald, in exchange for a lucrative oil exploration deal in Haiti. George took the deal, but sadly he meddled in Oswald's life. As he admits himself in his own 1978 book, I'm A Patsy! I'm A Patsy!, George carefully set up Lee Harvey Oswald to hate and despise Ex-General Edwin Walker.

When Oswald finally brought that hatred to a head, George (along with those few Dallas liberals who had urged Oswald) ran away like scared rabbits, never to see Oswald again.

That's the main story and main role of George DM in the life of Lee Harvey Oswald as I see it, Vitali. We cannot explain the JFK murder without George DM -- not as a CIA agent, and not as a Nazi plotter to kill JFK. But as the man who led Oswald down the rosy path of "equality by murder" -- and awoke the sleeping giant that was Edwin Walker.

As in the witness of Harry Dean, I find the connection to Edwin Walker in the witness of Ron Lewis to be a spectacular find for historians of the JFK murder.

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo

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Of course I knew that. You're doing an appeal to authority, that Lewis is OK because Stone believed him. Oliver Stone?? Who believes a LOT of wrong things?? You must be kidding.

Edited by Stephen Roy

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Of course I knew that. You're doing an appeal to authority, that Lewis is OK because Stone believed him. Oliver Stone?? Who believes a LOT of wrong things?? You must be kidding.

OK, Stephen, point taken. You knew that Oliver Stone accepted Ron Lewis' account of his brief friendship with Lee Harvey Oswald in the summer of 1963 in New Orleans.

Also, you're correct that "authority" means nothing when assessing facts. But in Dawn's quotation of your words about Ron Lewis, you wrote: "Nothing. Nada. Nobody had ever heard of him."

Obviously, that was an overstatement which required some balance. Oliver Stone isn't "nobody."

Granted, just because Oliver Stone believes Ron Lewis is no reason to believe Ron Lewis. After all, Oliver Stone believed Jim Garrison, and there are plenty of holes in Garrison's theory.

Nevertheless, Stephen, you wrote: "Nothing. Nada. Nobody had ever heard of him." And in today's post you're admitting that you knew, even then, that Oliver Stone himself had heard of Ron Lewis. So, now I'm satisfied.

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo

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