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A Key Part of Setting Up the Assassination


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In the midst of escalating rhetorical conflict between Kennedy and Goldwater, the following took place on Friday, October 11, 1963, exactly six weeks before President Kennedy was assassinated while riding from Dallas Love Field.

Senator Barry Goldwater visited Texas and the Washington Post reported:

“Goldwater flew to San Antonio and got a red carpet welcome midway through a three-night speaking schedule that will take him across the nation.”

(Washington Post, 10/12/63, page 2)

“The Senator rode from the airport in an open convertible” while “a crowd of fans chanted ‘We want Barry’ and waved ‘Goldwater for President’ signs.”

“Goldwater, rated by pollsters as a leader among potential candidates for the 1964 Republican presidential nomination, waved and leaned over to shake hands.”

Goldwater “touched down in San Antonio for less than a day” to address the Military Order of World Wars.

It was also on that day that page one of the Dallas Morning News said that Goldwater would announce his candidacy in January, a report that Goldwater denied when he stopped over briefly at Dallas Love Field while on his way to the grand reception in San Antonio.

This visit to Texas by Goldwater was key to setting up Kennedy to be assassinated.

On September 23, 1963, twelve days after George H. W. Bush announced his candidacy for the Senate in Texas, the Washington Post reported, “One of Senator Barry Goldwater’s strongholds in the Presidential nomination race is Texas. The Arizona Republican’s supporters contend he will sweep the South, including the Lone Star State . . . He is gaining on Kennedy. In May, the President led the Senator 60 per cent to 26 per cent, while a poll released a week ago shows the President still ahead but by 46 per cent to 39 per cent . . . Just to make Texas more interesting, the latest announced GOP Senatorial candidate is George Bush, son of former Senator Prescott Bush.”

Edited by Anthony Frank
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"Just to make Texas more interesting, the latest announced GOP Senatorial candidate is George Bush, son of former Senator Prescott Bush.”

This is interesting in that Bush seems to have been a little more well known at the time than I have assumed. And since a known, active CIA agent would not be an announced candidate for political office, it doesn't make sense that Hoover would refer to him in an FBI memo as "Mr. George Bush of the CIA." This would mean that Hoover was in fact referring to the other George Bush, the CIA employee who later strongly denied it was him. The question then becomes, why that denial? There was something later being hidden about that George Bush's connection to the events of November 1963.

Edited by Ron Ecker
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I am sure that the George Bush referred to in the FBI memo was actually George H. W. Bush, the man who went on to become the 41st President of the United States.

I think Hoover simply din't think the memo would be for public consumption. I doubt that Hoover knew that Bush was running for the Republican nomination in Texas.

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I am sure that the George Bush referred to in the FBI memo was actually George H. W. Bush, the man who went on to become the 41st President of the United States.

I think Hoover simply din't think the memo would be for public consumption. I doubt that Hoover knew that Bush was running for the Republican nomination in Texas.

I don't know much about undercover CIA work, but it seems odd to me that an agent under cover enough to be running for Congress would at the same time put himself, or be put, in a position of being officially briefed for the agency by the FBI.

The other George Bush reportedly specialized in maps and coastlines. That would include maps and coastlines of Cuba. He was also on weekend duty at the CIA the weekend of the assassination. It makes me wonder if he was part of or privy to a planned or hoped for invasion of Cuba in the immediate wake of the assassination (assuming it was to be blamed on Castro), something that later could not be disclosed, hence his denial that he talked with anybody about the assassination. But that's just my speculation. There was a lot happening in those days that doesn't make sense.

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The other George Bush, George William Bush, was a low level clerk that only worked for the CIA 6 months.

He was working the night shift at CIA headquarters, as CIA spokeswoman Sharron Basso stated in 1988 and she said that would have been "the appropriate place to have received such an FBI report." That report took place on November 23, 1963, presumably in Washington and perhaps in the wee hours of the morning or else late that night, in either case when this low level clerk was on duty. George H.W. Bush was in Tyler and Dallas the afternoon of November 22, with plans to return to his Houston home on November 23.

He denied he was the Bush of the Hoover memo and logicly so.

Would he be the first government xxxx in the JFK case?

A man of his low stature would not be included in memo's from the FBI director.

He would be included if he in fact was the person who received the report. Hoover would not say that the information was furnished to "somebody at the CIA."

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This is interesting in that Bush seems to have been a little more well known at the time than I have assumed.

Bush's bid for the Senate was just the beginning and his fellow CIA officer Barry Goldwater knew that Bush was "a bright hope on the political horizon."

Texas was Lyndon Johnson's home state and they were planning on Bush being swept into office on Goldwater's coattails after they assassinated President Johnson on October 31, 1964.

The Dallas Morning News accentuated the Bush-Goldwater partnership when it reported on a Republican rally held in San Antonio, Texas, on October 31, 1964, the day that Goldwater was expecting President Johnson to be assassinated.

“Given standing ovations on his two appearances on the program, Bush declared, ‘The work of the Republican party is going terrifically in Texas. Goldwater is going to help our race’ . . . The ovation for the Republican candidate for US Senator from Texas was second only to that given the party’s standard bearer for President, Barry Goldwater.” (Dallas Morning News, 11-1-64, page 9)

At the San Antonio rally on October 31, 1964 “Goldwater recalled that he had served while the Texan’s father, Prescott Bush, was serving as a US Senator from Connecticut . . . The Presidential candidate singled out Bush for praise as a bright hope on the political horizon.”

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