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Anthony Frank

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  1. The CIA worked with a group of Sicilians in smuggling drugs into the United States. They were in Virginia where the CIA was and the CIA protected them from law enforcement authorities until 1984. There arrest was in the New York Times and other newspapers in August 1984.
  2. I personally think that the admittedly Marxist Oswald was enlisted by the conspirators to be part of the FPCC so that they could pull off the cover up. Johnson feared that if Cubans had been involved in the JFK assassination, it would get us into a nuclear war. Earl Warren admitted to that in 1972, and he stated that it was the reason he agreed to lead the investigation into KFK's death. The lack of information on the FPCC may very well indicate that it had been set up solely for the purpose of having Oswald pass out the leaflets, which could have simply been a means of employment for Oswald.
  3. As for that pristine bullet, it was actually found on the floor. In 1967, a New York Times article reported on an interview with O.P. Wright, chief of security at Parkland Hospital. Mr. Wright recounted that a bullet “had dislodged after a stretcher had been moved and it was lying on the floor.” “Mr. Wright said that for more than half an hour Secret Service men ‘didn't seem interested in coming in and looking at the bullet in the position it was in’ . . . His efforts to get a Federal agent to take the bullet finally led to a matter-of-fact acceptance without questioning or additional investigation, Mr. Wright said.” The “official” story alleges that President Kennedy was struck by two bullets, one that “disintegrated” after causing the fatal head wound and the other allegedly passing through his throat and causing Governor Connally’s wounds in the chest and wrist (the magic bullet). The bullet that the “Secret Service” was trying to ignore didn’t officially exist, but maybe this bullet was to become the “magic bullet.” If this bullet had actually become “dislodged,” Mr. Wright’s unwanted help was interfering with plans for a cover-up. If Mr. Wright was mistaken and it hadn’t become “dislodged,” then it was there to factor into the fabricated story of how Kennedy’s wounds were caused. Either way, it was undoubtedly very important that “Secret Service” agents ignore the security chief’s attempts to call their attention to the bullet on the floor. Twenty-six days after Kennedy was assassinated, a Washington Post article headlined “Kennedy Autopsy Report: Final Bullet Was Lethal” said, “Both bullets that struck the President were tied by ballistics tests to the rifle found in that building where Lee Harvey Oswald worked,” and one of the bullets was “found deep in his shoulder,” but “the one bullet that struck Governor Connally, however, could not be similarly traced to any rifle because it fragmented.” In this scenario, the “Secret Service” would have to be ignoring the bullet that struck Kennedy in the head, which has since officially “disintegrated.” The “magic bullet,” which the new story alleges passed through Kennedy’s throat and wounded Governor Connally, is officially the only bullet in evidence, and it was “officially” found on a stretcher, but the “Secret Service” was the source of that official information.
  4. Has this photo been authenticated in any way? Lots of bogus photos have been floating around for more than 20 years. The autopsy photos had not been officially released by the early 1990s. I don't know if they ever were.
  5. When I expose the corruption in the United Staes government and the CIA, Bush and Kerry will both be removed from office. Whoever is Vice President at the time will become President. I think that will probably be Edwards.
  6. Let's look at the "Secret Service" and the attempt to kill President Reagan on March 30, 1981. Keep in mind that former CIA Director George H. W. Bush was Vice President at the time. “When Reagan came out of the Hilton, the bulletproof Presidential limousine was not waiting directly in front of the hotel exit, as Secret Service practice usually requires.” “If it had been, Reagan would have had a straight-line walk of about eight feet from door to car. Instead, he had to walk diagonally down the sidewalk about twenty-five feet, bringing him around a curve and into the line of fire of accused assailant John W. Hinckley, Jr.” “Television crew members at the Hilton said they had complained to the Secret Service about bystanders pushing into the area reserved for the press. One bystander, as it turned out, was the accused gunman.” (Washington Post, 4-1-81, page 16) “A Secret Service official said the advance agent on the scene concluded that it would be counterproductive to set up an area restricted only to the press on the narrow, curving walk outside the hotel.” (Counterproductive?) “Henry M. Brown of ABC,” a television cameraman who had photographed most of the event, “said he had complained earlier to the Secret Service that members of the public had ‘penetrated the police line,’ creating crowded conditions in the press area and making it difficult to work. His complaint went unheeded, and Brown went on working. He was standing near the assailant when he started to fire.” (Washington Post, 3-31-81, page 10) “‘He just opened up and kept squeezing the trigger,’ Brown said.” “A Secret Service official said the press area outside the hotel was not a ‘dedicated press area.’” “Generally, agents want the armored limousine waiting in a direct line with the President’s exit door as he moves from building to car.” “Such positioning shortens the period of vulnerability and makes it easier for agents to form a human shield as the public figure moves. In some cases, agents have had the car moved one foot or less to have it perfectly aligned with the exit.” “On Monday, though, Reagan’s limousine was waiting about twenty to twenty-five feet down the driveway from the door. To reach the car, Reagan had to walk down the curving sidewalk. Around the curve, flush against the hotel wall, the assailant waited with his pistol.” Tony
  7. And just how did the "Secret Service" respond when the man who was going to be President Johnson's accused assassin was discovered??? Let's read what happened . . . On October 31, 1964, Suffolk County Police arrested Robert Babcock 300 yards from Republic Aviation Corporation in New York, where President Johnson stepped from his plane on the company’s airstrip eight minutes later. He was arrested because he had a telescopic rifle on the seat beside him and a loaded shotgun in his trunk. Detectives spotted him in a routine check and took him into custody twenty minutes before the President passed by. “The President’s motorcade had been expected to make a number of stops along the motorcade route . . .” Robert Babcock was questioned by Suffolk County Police and the Secret Service, and “said first that he had been going on a hunting trip when he decided to stop and see the motorcade. He then said he made a bet with barroom acquaintances that he could do what he did without being detected.” “He was charged with disorderly conduct and jailed for the night.” If Suffolk County Police hadn’t arrested Robert Babcock, the KGB officers in the CIA would have assassinated President Johnson on October 31, 1964, and Robert Babcock would have been an ideal fall guy, thanks to some “barroom acquaintances.” There were no bullets for the telescopic rifle, which would have been conducive to persuading him to take this action, but that would be easily rectified, and Robert Babcock would have found it impossible to understand how the murder weapon could be alleged to have been in his possession, and why the loaded shotgun in his trunk made him look more guilty. The Suffolk County Police gave an alibi to a man who wasn’t supposed to have one, a man who was intrinsic to a Presidential assassination, and the “Secret Service” was so easily appeased because they knew their plans had gone awry and they wanted this to receive as little attention as possible. Where, when, why, and how he obtained the weapons, or if he owned them, was instantaneously of no significance, and the anonymous “barroom acquaintances” that persuaded him to take this action by making a bet with him remained anonymous, while he was simply charged with “disorderly conduct.” The easily duped Mr. Babcock could’ve simply driven to the area of the first scheduled stop after one or more of the “barroom acquaintances” told him where it was. They could have also told him that where he would park wasn’t actually near the first scheduled stop. Or he could have even been told to first park along the motorcade route, and then drive a certain distance behind the motorcade as it traveled to the area of the first scheduled stop as part of the bet. The “barroom acquaintances” were undoubtedly sure that he intended to carry out their plans as he left. As he embarked on his daring venture, his instigators could have also said, “We know nothing’s going to happen but if it does, just get in your car and get out of there,” which would have been very conducive to making it look like he was the assassin. Pulling out their money and saying, “We’ll see you when you get back, and we’ll know if you didn’t do it,” would have affirmed Robert Babcock’s idea that he was going to come into some easy money with a simplistic act. Whatever the exact details of this assassination plan were, one thing is certain; the KGB officers who assassinated President Kennedy were going to assassinate President Johnson on October 31, 1964, and Robert Babcock was going to be the accused assassin. What is also crystal clear from the details given, is that a man can be paid money to sit along the motorcade route of the President of the United States with a telescopic rifle on the seat beside him and a loaded shotgun in the trunk, and the United States “Secret Service” will do nothing but charge him with disorderly conduct and jail him for the night. This text presents a clear reason why that could happen. Tony
  8. The Secret Service is the CIA. It's a highly classified state secret and intelligence officers must have a "need to know" before they are privy to this fact. The CIA took over Secret Service duties as a result of legislation signed in 1951. In July of 1951, four years after the CIA was created under provisions of the National Security Act of 1947, and two years after the “super-secret” legislation “legalizing the work of the CIA,” President Truman signed a bill making the United States Secret Service “a permanent Government agency for the first time.” Prior to that, it had “existed on a year to year basis” for “eighty-six years.” Besides Presidential protection and suppressing counterfeiting, the Secret Service “takes part in other security activities the nature of which is not made public.” Six days after Truman signed the new legislation, a New York Times article detailed more information about the Secret Service. It said that the Secret Service had handled counterespionage during the Spanish-American War, and that it didn’t begin Presidential protection until President McKinley’s assassination in 1901. The Secret Service, originally set up in 1865 to suppress counterfeiting, “gradually took over other functions.” Prior to this “permanent status” of the Secret Service, “every year Congress had to approve its continuation.” “Secret Service” agents displayed grossly conspicuous behavior on November 22, 1963, at Parkland Hospital where President Kennedy was taken after he was shot. In 1967, a New York Times article reported on an interview with O.P. Wright, chief of security at Parkland Hospital. Mr. Wright recounted that a bullet “had dislodged after a stretcher had been moved and it was lying on the floor.” “Mr. Wright said that for more than half an hour Secret Service men ‘didn't seem interested in coming in and looking at the bullet in the position it was in’ . . . His efforts to get a Federal agent to take the bullet finally led to a matter-of-fact acceptance without questioning or additional investigation, Mr. Wright said.” The “official” story alleges that President Kennedy was struck by two bullets, one that “disintegrated” after causing the fatal head wound and the other allegedly passing through his throat and causing Governor Connally’s wounds in the chest and wrist (the magic bullet). The bullet that the “Secret Service” was trying to ignore didn’t officially exist, but maybe this bullet was to become the “magic bullet.” If this bullet had actually become “dislodged,” Mr. Wright’s unwanted help was interfering with plans for a cover-up. If Mr. Wright was mistaken and it hadn’t become “dislodged,” then it was there to factor into the fabricated story of how Kennedy’s wounds were caused. Either way, it was undoubtedly very important that “Secret Service” agents ignore the security chief’s attempts to call their attention to the bullet on the floor. Twenty-six days after Kennedy was assassinated, a Washington Post article headlined “Kennedy Autopsy Report: Final Bullet Was Lethal” said, “Both bullets that struck the President were tied by ballistics tests to the rifle found in that building where Lee Harvey Oswald worked,” and one of the bullets was “found deep in his shoulder,” but “the one bullet that struck Governor Connally, however, could not be similarly traced to any rifle because it fragmented.” In this scenario, the “Secret Service” would have to be ignoring the bullet that struck Kennedy in the head, which has since officially “disintegrated.” The “magic bullet,” which the new story alleges passed through Kennedy’s throat and wounded Governor Connally, is officially the only bullet in evidence, and it was “officially” found on a stretcher, but the “Secret Service” was the source of that official information. Two days after President Kennedy’s assassination, the Washington Post reported: “Under law, the chief of the Secret Service is empowered to overrule the President on the question of security precautions.” Such a law, which may have changed since Congress was made aware of it in 1984, could not have existed for an agency that was originally set up to suppress counterfeiting, not protect the President, an agency that existed on a year-to-year basis. This “law” was in the bill that Truman signed twelve years earlier, the bill that Truman signed in 1951 making the “Secret Service” a permanent agency. Since this was the legislation in which the CIA would assume the responsibility of the Secret Service, it was a nice supplement to the National Security Act of 1947 and the “super-secret” legislation of 1949. Tony
  9. miketol wrote; "JFK is the guy who was "out to lunch" when Diem got assassinated." A Washington Post article on September 22, 1963, about Kennedy’s efforts to oust the repressive Diem-Nhu regime in South Vietnam, said that “certain elements of the CIA believe that there is no alternative to the Diem-Nhu axis. These sentiments also exist among American military leaders . . . The brass simply feels that any change in American policy would wreck the war effort. The firmest opponents of change, however, seem to be certain top CIA people. There is strong reason to believe that the recent Times of Vietnam story exposing an alleged CIA coup attempt was actually leaked by CIA dissidents themselves in an attempt to forestall any American attempt to dump Nhu . . . CIA dissidents see positive virtues in Nhu . . . Ambassador Lodge cannot fully trust his own staff members.” On October 5, 1963, the Washington Post reported: “John H. Richardson, CIA station chief in South Vietnam, is being recalled to Washington . . . Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge is reported on good authority to have requested Richardson’s replacement . . . Richardson has been one of the key men in development of the U.S. Role of helping the Diem government fight Communist guerrillas . . . There have been persistent reports of differences between Lodge and the CIA staff.” At a news conference on October 9, 1963, President Kennedy “vigorously defended the role of the Central Intelligence Agency in South Vietnam . . . The President devoted a good share of his 30 minute news conference to the subject of the CIA, a normally sacrosanct matter which the White House never airs in public.” On November 1, 1963, three weeks before the President who was the antithesis of right-wing megalomaniac endeavors was assassinated, the Diem-Nhu regime was ousted in a coup. “Diem was defended to the last by the special forces troops trained by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.” The KGB officers had not foreseen Kennedy’s removal of the Diem-Nhu regime before his death, and Kennedy’s interference with their agenda was a clear reason why they wanted an intelligence officer under their control to be President. The removal of the Diem-Nhu regime, however, wasn’t going to change the KGB's agenda, especially since they killed the President responsible for it. The KGB officers in the CIA were still intent on having a Communist insurgency take over in South Vietnam, and the CIA and the American military were used to restart the repressive environment. After all, exactly two months before the CIA killed President Kennedy, the Washington Post article said that “CIA dissidents see positive virtues in Nhu,” and American military brass in South Vietnam “simply feels that any change in American policy would wreck the war effort.” Only President Nixon’s desperate attempt to fend off political fallout from the Watergate scandal as his second term began brought about a ‘peace’ treaty in January 1973, but it was nothing more than an American agreement to bid a hasty retreat from South Vietnam, nine years and three months after President Kennedy “vigorously defended the role of the Central Intelligence Agency in South Vietnam.” Tony
  10. Regarding the alleged "autopsy photos" that are widely circulated . . . In the mid-1990s, I called the office of Congressman Louis Stokes, Chairman of the House Assassinations Committee in the 1970s, and ask4ed about the autopsy photos. They referred me to Robert Blakey at Notre Dame Law School. Mr. Blakey was the assassination committee’s general counsel. I called Mr. Blakey at Notre Dame and asked him when the autopsy photos were first made public. He stated that they’ve never been made public, so I queried him on the publicly circulated photos and he stated that they were “stolen documents.” I asked him if that meant they haven’t been authenticated in any way and he said that was correct, stressing that they were stolen documents. Further research into news articles revealed that when the House Assassinations Committee was investigating President Kennedy’s assassination, Regis Blahut, a CIA officer who had been detailed to “assist” the committee, broke into a combination safe at the committee’s offices. The break-in was reported in the news several months after the House Assassinations Committee actually disbanded. “The safe was reserved for physical evidence of President Kennedy’s assassination, including the autopsy photos, X-rays, and other articles, such as the so-called ‘magic bullet’ that wounded both Kennedy and Texas Governor John B. Connally.” “Autopsy photos of the head shot that killed Kennedy had been taken out of their cases and were left in disarray inside the three drawer safe . . . There was no doubt that the files in the safe had been tampered with . . . ‘It looked as though someone had just run out.’” Blahut’s fingerprints “were all over the place, on the photos, inside the safe, and on all sorts of different packages.” “The CIA acknowledged that it has dismissed the individual in question. ‘We’re satisfied it was just a matter of curiosity,’ said CIA spokesman Herbert Hetu.” (Blahut obviously made sure that the break-in would be noticed and that the autopsy photos were in disarray. That’s because the CIA does things for a reason, and if the CIA spokesman were to be believed, what he was really saying was, “Yes, the agent we assigned to assist the House Assassinations Committee broke into their safe, but that’s only because he was curious. In fact, we fired him. We’re satisfied.”) “In a telephone interview with the Washington Post, Blahut denied any wrongdoing. He insisted that there was an innocent explanation. He refused, however, to say what that was.” (The Post got its responses from the CIA and Blahut when they publicized the break-in.) Blahut said he worked for the CIA’s Office of Security and he stated, “There’s other things that are involved that are detrimental to other things,” and he refused to elaborate when asked what he meant by that. Blahut went on to say, “I signed an oath of secrecy. I cannot discuss it any further. . . . I’ve already defended myself to my employers. As far as I’m concerned, that’s all cleared up.” He also claimed to have passed CIA lie detector tests over the matter. (It doesn’t sound like he’d been fired. And why did the CIA have an agent with their Office of Security assigned to “assist” the House Assassinations Committee?) A couple of months after the Washington Post publicized that the Committee’s safe had been broken into, a man named Harrison Livingstone claimed that he was selling photographs from President Kennedy’s autopsy. At that time, Robert Blakey had said, “There are two things possible here. Either it’s a fraud, or it’s an attempt to sell stolen property.” Harrison Livingstone responded at that time by saying that they weren’t stolen, but the day after he made his claim about trying to sell the photographs, he said he was taking them off the market, still claiming that they weren’t stolen but allegedly claiming that he feared the Justice Department would take action against him. Photographs ultimately surfaced that show a bullet-size hole in the back of President Kennedy’s skull and the public has accepted that they are from President Kennedy’s autopsy. The CIA was obviously the source of the photographs and they undoubtedly had the sloppy break-in perpetrated to make the photos seem as though they were authentic autopsy photos. No wonder the spokesman said the CIA was “satisfied.” Tony
  11. The Warren Commission DID NOT look at the autopsy photos. In June 1967, Warren Commission member John J. McCloy, "in his first public comment on the investigation," said that he thinks "the commission should have studied the photographs and X-rays taken of President Kennedy after his assassination." "He said that the Warren Commission had ‘all the facilities we needed’ and made its own choice not to subpoena the photographs." [New York Times, 6-29-67, page 18] He said they made the decision not to because “we were perhaps a little oversensitive to what we understood were the sensitivities of the Kennedy family,” as though it made sense that in the course of investigating a Presidential assassination, they would refrain from looking at the photographs and X-rays based on such bizarre logic. (An army pathologist refrained from dissecting Kennedy’s neck to trace the path of the bullet because “the family wanted no examination of the neck organs,” as if within ten or twelve hours of President Kennedy’s horridly violent and bloody assassination, the Kennedy family actually said something about not wanting the neck organs examined.) “Mr. McCloy, a lawyer and diplomat, nevertheless insists that the seven man commission ‘had the best evidence; the pathology in respect to the President’s wounds.’” Tony
  12. So why wasn't LBJ indicted in these scandals if his indictment was impending?
  13. There was no public evidence in 1963, but in an "Eyes Only" memo on October 11, 1963, President Kennedy's National Security Adviser, McGeorge Bundy, wrote: "The President approved . . . plans to withdraw 1000 U.S. military personnel by the end of 1963." Kennedy also directed that "no formal announcement be made." The memo can be seen at: http://www.cs.umb.edu/jfklibrary/images/nsam263.jpg Tony
  14. There is no way that JFK would have dropped Lyndon Johnson. Kennedy not only needed Texas, he needed to take the Southern states where Goldwater, his likely '64 opponent, was very popular. Dropping LBJ would have cost him dearly. As it turned out, Goldwater took only six states in 1964; 5 Southern segregationist states, Louisiana, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, and his home state of Arizona. Kennedy would have lost Texas and all the Southern states and the conservative states if he had dropped Johnson.
  15. President Kennedy is often remembered for what he said in his inaugural address on January 20, 1961. "Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country."
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