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Excerpts from Gen. Maxwell Taylor's Deposition Testimony


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Excerpts from Maxwell Taylor’s Deposition Testimony

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...c.do?docId=1368

Executive Session

Wednesday, July 9, 1975

Present: Senators Church, [presiding] Mondale, Huddleston, Hart of Colorado, Tower, Goldwater, Mathias, Schweiker.

Also Present: Frederick A.O. Schwarz, Jr., Chief Counsel; Curtis R. Smothers, Minority Counsel; Charles Kirbow, Michael J. Madigan, Charles Lombard, Paul Wallach and Patrick Shea, Frederick Baron

Testimony of General Maxwell Taylor

Mr Smothers: Would you state for the record please, your full name and address.

General Taylor: Maxwell Davenport Taylor, 2500 Massachusets Avenue, S.W.

Mr Smothers: What was your first contact with the Kennedy administration?

General Taylor: I was telephoned in New York on August the 21st, I believe, where I was in civil life, bothering no one, I thought, building the Kennedy Center,

and found the President of the United States on the phone, President Kennedy who said, you see from the papers I am in trouble as a result of the Cuban affair.

I would like to talk to you about it, would you come down?

General Taylor: And so, I obviously said yes, and reported down the next morning at 10:00 at the White House, to hear the President’s account of what happened at the Bay of Pigs and his great concern to determine why it had been the failure, that he had been assured by his principle advisors that this was indeed a desirable enterprise, a feasible enterprise, and yet here it was a ghastly disaster.

The question was why?

Mr Smothers: Did the question ask you to do anything in conjunction with this disaster?

General Taylor: That was the purpose of him asking me down, as I then discovered. That he wanted me to undertake a review of the Bay of Pigs for that purpose, to see what had gone wrong and why.

He made it clear that he had no punitive intention, he was not trying to find a scapegoat. He would accept that responsibility himself. But he thought he must know in order to improve the procedures of his Administration and correct the faults that had been developed in this operation.

Very shortly thereafter he indicated he was making his brother, Robert, and Adm. Arlei Burke, the CNO and Allen Dulles, available to work with me in the Task Force of which I was Chairman.

Taylor Exhibit # 1 letter dated April 22, 1961

page 14.

Mr Smothers: General Taylor, in the discharge of your duties as Military Assistant to the President, what primary function were you assigned in July of ‘61.

General Taylor: Two general areas, military and intelligence, but then again, within that area, focussing on Berlin, because I had been a former commandant in Berlin, and on South-east Asia, which was becoming an increasing problem for President Kennedy.

page 17

Mr Smothers: Would you say, though, based on that, that you had a pretty clear picture of what the Agency was doing in that summer of 1961 timeframe?

General Taylor: Well I would say yes, probably as clear a picture, as a group which performs these functions. Now obviously if you really want me to say I know everything that I need to know, many times you would have to go out into the field and spend hours and day’s probing into the specific thing and we didn’t do that, we couldn’t do it and we were not expected to. So I would say that it was a broad oversight which depended — — as in all cases gentlemen, it will always depend on the integrity of the head of that Agency. He has the means, to hold things back, to conceal, to do almost anything at least for a period of time and never be detected. The point is, you can’t afford to have a man like that running the Agency.

page 21

Mr Smothers: Did you to the best of your knowledge, in your conversations, or in any instructions you may have given to Mr. Parrott, raise the question of assassination?

General Taylor: Never, Never at any time, with him or anybody else. may I put that in the record?

The Chairman: Certainly

page 23 General Taylor: It was the President’s desire that General Lansdale be brought in to the picture and be given an important role. That resulted in considerable discussion within the Special Group, how to carry out the President’s desire, and we ended up by deciding we needed to take the normal Special Group and add two members, namely Robert Kennedy and Gen. Lyman Lemnitzer who was the Chairman of the Joint Chief’s of Staff,

Taylor Exhibit # 3 dated memorandum of March 16th, 1962

page 25

Mr Smothers: General, with respect to the function to be performed by General Lansdale, did you provide guidance to General Lansdale, as to the kinds of things that were to be considered at the meetings of the Special Group (Augmented)?

General Taylor: No, he knew the general purpose. You have in your papers a statement outline of the MONGOOSE guidance which I drew up, as I recall, and discussed and got approval from my colleagues on the Special Group (Augmented), one which I think the record shows— — I have forgotten — — we took to the President, and while he did not approve it, he became aware of what we thought the general courses would be. Well that of course, was the Constitution, so to speak, for General Lansdale, and it was up to him then to go out and come back with specific propositions consistent with this guidance for our consideration and approval.

Taylor Exhibit # 4 dated memorandum of May 7, 1962 page 29.

Taylor Exhibit # 5 dated memorandum of March 13th, 1962 page 32 memo from Lansdale to Special Group Augmented

page 49 ”The Attorney General then stated that in view of this lack of progress he was going to give more personal attention to Operation MONGOOSE. In order to do this, he will hold a meeting every morning at 0930 with the MONGOOSE operational representatives from the various agencies. (Lansdale, Harvey, Hurwitch, Ryan and General Johnson ).”

page 54-55......General Taylor: General Lansdale is trying to back a course of action he knows the rest of my group is not going to support.

Mr. Smother’s: He’s trying to end run you, by this memo?

General Taylor: Well, I’m not suggesting some trick. He has the right to correspond with the Attorney General if he wants to.

page 56

Mr. Smother’s: Turning a moment to the actors, if you will, the personalities involved at the time in question, you have indicated what I believe was a slightly negative feeling towards General Lansdale when you said........

General Taylor: Well, that was an unkind remark and I shouldn’t have made it. I had never met General Lansdale until I came to the White House at this time. I knew his reputation, which was known around the world, as a matter of fact, very effective work in Vietnam and in the Philippines. I found, in my contacts with General Lansdale in this period, that he was a great idea man and he was a good contact man, but as an administrator and an organizer he was defective, and you gentlemen, if you read the kind of papers he brought in, there was just an endless laundry list of dirty tricks, none of which had any merit and in combination had no great chance of succeeding.

page 58

Senator Baker: General, I have a dilemma. A continuing dillema, we’ve had it for some time now. The testimony, for instance, of Mr Helm’s, who was former Director of Central Intelligence, and before that the DDP, who testified as I recall to the effect that he never doubted for a moment that the overthrow of the Castro regime, by whatever means, including assassination, was the policy of the government of the United States, and that, when I asked him if there was any possibility of misinterpretation in that respect, he replied that he was almost in daily contact with the Attorney General and if I’m not mistaken with members of the Special Group. I do not have the transcript here before me --

Mr. Kirbow: with the Attorney General.

Senator Baker: But with the Attorney General.

So you see where that leaves us. That leaves us with Helm’s testimony which would appear to me to be in direct conflict with this testimony unless there was a special communication between Helms and Robert Kennedy.

page 61

”The Attorney General then stated that in view of this lack of progress he was going to give more personal attention to Operation MONGOOSE. In order to do this, he will hold a meeting every morning at 0930 with the MONGOOSE operational representatives from the various agencies. (Lansdale, Harvey, Hurwitch, Ryan and General Johnson ).”

General Taylor: Yes.

Senator Schweiker: And who was that General Johnson, I am not clear.

General Taylor: I’m not sure.

Senator Schweiker: It says of the Joint Staff, thats your staff.

General Taylor: Yes, but there are 500 officers on that staff.

Senator Schweiker: Yes, but can you imagine, an officer meeting with the Attorney General every day at 9:30 without clearing, or telling you about it?

General Taylor: No, he reports it to his boss.

Senator Schweiker: What’s that.

General Taylor: There are many bosses between General Johnson and the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Senator Schweiker: Are there many Generals on your staff that would have reported directly to the Attorney General every day

General Taylor: Well, there were— —

Senator Schweiker: Name somebody else.

General Taylor: He was sent over there to attend that meeting.

Senator Schweiker: Now, that’s what were getting at. It’s a special relationship. It’s not a normal usual relationship.

General Taylor: In the MONGOOSE Group there was a contact officer for State, for Defense and for the JCS.

Senator Schweiker: And for you.

General Taylor: No, the JCS is me, by this time, I am the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Senator Schweiker: Who’s General Johnson

General Taylor: I don’t know. There’s several Johnson’s.

Senator Schweiker: Isn’t he in the Joint Chiefs of Staff?

General Taylor: Senator he’s.....this is thirteen years ago, there are too many Johnson’s, too many years have passed by, I don’t know.

The Chairman: General would you like to take a recess for a minute?

General Taylor: Well, I’m very happy Senator, if you gentlemen want to take a break.

(Discussion off the record.)

(A brief recess was taken.)

page 69

Senator Mondale: But its also true am I not correct, in that when he [Helms] said that, he did not produce any evidence.

Senator Baker: Absolutely.

Senator Mondale: It has been further directly testified that Helm’s and Harvey agreed not to tell McCone what they were doing.

Senator Baker: Just as apparently no one told Taylor. So it may be that the most important thing we can do is to find out who did not tell things.

Schwartz: All right.

Now the final Exhibit, Lansdale 11, Stamped 1101, which is signed by a man called McManus, who was Mr. Helms Executive Assistant, and its dated November 5, 1962. And I represent to the Commitee that Mr. McManus was Mr. Helms Executive Assistant. It does not so show on the memorandum.

excerpts pages 85-86

Senator Matthias: In your review of the Bay of Pigs incident General, did you ever find out where Senator Keating got his information?

General Taylor: I never did. He drove us nuts you know, telling us about the missiles, and it turned out to be right, and it was very embarrassing, I would say.

The Chairman: If we knew, we might substitute his source for the CIA.

Senator Matthias: Well in assessing the work of the CIA, that would be very interesting.

General Taylor: John McCone made some prediction that that might happen, but he made without any background that would get his colleagues to take it seriously.

Robert: page 86 Is the last page of General Taylor’s Testimony material following his deposition till page 133 are exhibits and memorandums, which in my opinion certain segments of which, are as interesting as General Taylor’s Depo Testimony itself. It is in this section that contains McManus memorandum referenced in this excerpt of Taylor’s deposition.

Who was the General Johnson which the commitee asked General Taylor about, at first glance, it would seem apparent that it was Brigardier General Charles E. Johnson. At first I kept thinking of Deputy Undersecretary of State Alexis U. Johnson, but his position was in the State Department.

It was difficult to determine the issue of who Robert Kennedy was meeting with at 9:30 in the time period specified in General Taylor’s testimony. While the seemingly obvious person would be Brigadier General Charles E . Johnson, I was hard pressed to discover any confirmation that he was the person who met with Robert Kennedy during this period of the JFK Presidency. In 1964, it appears that a Charles E. Johnson, was a member of the National Security Council staff with primary responsibility for national security issues.1

On the other hand Alexis U. Johnson also sat in on EXCOMM meetings,2 and would seem to be a more likely candidate for a person who would have met with Robert Kennedy, in the time specified, but he was not a Brigadier General. An additional fact concerning Alexis U Johnson, is that he was “chairman of the NSAM 156 Committee, with Raymond L. Garthoff, the Executive Asssistant.3

1 See http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/frus/johnsonlb/x/10328.htm

See

DISPATCH-LETTER TO BRIGADIER GENERAL CHARLES E. JOHNSON FROM PASSAVOY DATED 24 OCTOBER 1962.

See NARA

http://www.nara.gov/cgi-bin/starfinder/23459/jfksnew.txt

2 http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/people/ex-comm.html

also see (Kennedy Library, National Security Files, Vietnam Country Series, Honolulul Meeting, Briefing Book 11/20/63 A)

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...p;relPageId=634

http://www.jfklibrary.org/Historical+Resou...a_cleveland.htm

3. See page 154, A Journey Through the Cold War By Raymond L. Garthoff, Brookings Institution.

http://books.google.com/books?id=hlN9YxUg8...pg=PA143&dq

Edited by Robert Howard
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Excerpts from Maxwell Taylor’s Deposition Testimony

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...c.do?docId=1368

Executive Session

Wednesday, July 9, 1975

Present: Senators Church, [presiding] Mondale, Huddleston, Hart of Colorado, Tower, Goldwater, Mathias, Schweiker.

Also Present: Frederick A.O. Schwarz, Jr., Chief Counsel; Curtis R. Smothers, Minority Counsel; Charles Kirbow, Michael J. Madigan, Charles Lombard, Paul Wallach and Patrick Shea, Frederick Baron

Testimony of General Maxwell Taylor

Mr Smothers: Would you state for the record please, your full name and address.

General Taylor: Maxwell Davenport Taylor, 2500 Massachusets Avenue, S.W.

Mr Smothers: What was your first contact with the Kennedy administration?

General Taylor: I was telephoned in New York on August the 21st, I believe, where I was in civil life, bothering no one, I thought, building the Kennedy Center,

and found the President of the United States on the phone, President Kennedy who said, you see from the papers I am in trouble as a result of the Cuban affair.

I would like to talk to you about it, would you come down?

General Taylor: And so, I obviously said yes, and reported down the next morning at 10:00 at the White House, to hear the President’s account of what happened at the Bay of Pigs and his great concern to determine why it had been the failure, that he had been assured by his principle advisors that this was indeed a desirable enterprise, a feasible enterprise, and yet here it was a ghastly disaster.

The question was why?

Mr Smothers: Did the question ask you to do anything in conjunction with this disaster?

General Taylor: That was the purpose of him asking me down, as I then discovered. That he wanted me to undertake a review of the Bay of Pigs for that purpose, to see what had gone wrong and why.

He made it clear that he had no punitive intention, he was not trying to find a scapegoat. He would accept that responsibility himself. But he thought he must know in order to improve the procedures of his Administration and correct the faults that had been developed in this operation.

Very shortly thereafter he indicated he was making his brother, Robert, and Adm. Arlei Burke, the CNO and Allen Dulles, available to work with me in the Task Force of which I was Chairman.

Taylor Exhibit # 1 letter dated April 22, 1961

page 14.

Mr Smothers: General Taylor, in the discharge of your duties as Military Assistant to the President, what primary function were you assigned in July of ‘61.

General Taylor: Two general areas, military and intelligence, but then again, within that area, focussing on Berlin, because I had been a former commandant in Berlin, and on South-east Asia, which was becoming an increasing problem for President Kennedy.

page 17

Mr Smothers: Would you say, though, based on that, that you had a pretty clear picture of what the Agency was doing in that summer of 1961 timeframe?

General Taylor: Well I would say yes, probably as clear a picture, as a group which performs these functions. Now obviously if you really want me to say I know everything that I need to know, many times you would have to go out into the field and spend hours and day’s probing into the specific thing and we didn’t do that, we couldn’t do it and we were not expected to. So I would say that it was a broad oversight which depended — — as in all cases gentlemen, it will always depend on the integrity of the head of that Agency. He has the means, to hold things back, to conceal, to do almost anything at least for a period of time and never be detected. The point is, you can’t afford to have a man like that running the Agency.

page 21

Mr Smothers: Did you to the best of your knowledge, in your conversations, or in any instructions you may have given to Mr. Parrott, raise the question of assassination?

General Taylor: Never, Never at any time, with him or anybody else. may I put that in the record?

The Chairman: Certainly

page 23 General Taylor: It was the President’s desire that General Lansdale be brought in to the picture and be given an important role. That resulted in considerable discussion within the Special Group, how to carry out the President’s desire, and we ended up by deciding we needed to take the normal Special Group and add two members, namely Robert Kennedy and Gen. Lyman Lemnitzer who was the Chairman of the Joint Chief’s of Staff,

Taylor Exhibit # 3 dated memorandum of March 16th, 1962

page 25

Mr Smothers: General, with respect to the function to be performed by General Lansdale, did you provide guidance to General Lansdale, as to the kinds of things that were to be considered at the meetings of the Special Group (Augmented)?

General Taylor: No, he knew the general purpose. You have in your papers a statement outline of the MONGOOSE guidance which I drew up, as I recall, and discussed and got approval from my colleagues on the Special Group (Augmented), one which I think the record shows— — I have forgotten — — we took to the President, and while he did not approve it, he became aware of what we thought the general courses would be. Well that of course, was the Constitution, so to speak, for General Lansdale, and it was up to him then to go out and come back with specific propositions consistent with this guidance for our consideration and approval.

Taylor Exhibit # 4 dated memorandum of May 7, 1962 page 29.

Taylor Exhibit # 5 dated memorandum of March 13th, 1962 page 32 memo from Lansdale to Special Group Augmented

page 49 ”The Attorney General then stated that in view of this lack of progress he was going to give more personal attention to Operation MONGOOSE. In order to do this, he will hold a meeting every morning at 0930 with the MONGOOSE operational representatives from the various agencies. (Lansdale, Harvey, Hurwitch, Ryan and General Johnson ).”

page 54-55......General Taylor: General Lansdale is trying to back a course of action he knows the rest of my group is not going to support.

Mr. Smother’s: He’s trying to end run you, by this memo?

General Taylor: Well, I’m not suggesting some trick. He has the right to correspond with the Attorney General if he wants to.

page 56

Mr. Smother’s: Turning a moment to the actors, if you will, the personalities involved at the time in question, you have indicated what I believe was a slightly negative feeling towards General Lansdale when you said........

General Taylor: Well, that was an unkind remark and I shouldn’t have made it. I had never met General Lansdale until I came to the White House at this time. I knew his reputation, which was known around the world, as a matter of fact, very effective work in Vietnam and in the Philippines. I found, in my contacts with General Lansdale in this period, that he was a great idea man and he was a good contact man, but as an administrator and an organizer he was defective, and you gentlemen, if you read the kind of papers he brought in, there was just an endless laundry list of dirty tricks, none of which had any merit and in combination had no great chance of succeeding.

page 58

Senator Baker: General, I have a dilemma. A continuing dillema, we’ve had it for some time now. The testimony, for instance, of Mr Helm’s, who was former Director of Central Intelligence, and before that the DDP, who testified as I recall to the effect that he never doubted for a moment that the overthrow of the Castro regime, by whatever means, including assassination, was the policy of the government of the United States, and that, when I asked him if there was any possibility of misinterpretation in that respect, he replied that he was almost in daily contact with the Attorney General and if I’m not mistaken with members of the Special Group. I do not have the transcript here before me --

Mr. Kirbow: with the Attorney General.

Senator Baker: But with the Attorney General.

So you see where that leaves us. That leaves us with Helm’s testimony which would appear to me to be in direct conflict with this testimony unless there was a special communication between Helms and Robert Kennedy.

page 61

”The Attorney General then stated that in view of this lack of progress he was going to give more personal attention to Operation MONGOOSE. In order to do this, he will hold a meeting every morning at 0930 with the MONGOOSE operational representatives from the various agencies. (Lansdale, Harvey, Hurwitch, Ryan and General Johnson ).”

General Taylor: Yes.

Senator Schweiker: And who was that General Johnson, I am not clear.

General Taylor: I’m not sure.

Senator Schweiker: It says of the Joint Staff, thats your staff.

General Taylor: Yes, but there are 500 officers on that staff.

Senator Schweiker: Yes, but can you imagine, an officer meeting with the Attorney General every day at 9:30 without clearing, or telling you about it?

General Taylor: No, he reports it to his boss.

Senator Schweiker: What’s that.

General Taylor: There are many bosses between General Johnson and the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Senator Schweiker: Are there many Generals on your staff that would have reported directly to the Attorney General every day

General Taylor: Well, there were— —

Senator Schweiker: Name somebody else.

General Taylor: He was sent over there to attend that meeting.

Senator Schweiker: Now, that’s what were getting at. It’s a special relationship. It’s not a normal usual relationship.

General Taylor: In the MONGOOSE Group there was a contact officer for State, for Defense and for the JCS.

Senator Schweiker: And for you.

General Taylor: No, the JCS is me, by this time, I am the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Senator Schweiker: Who’s General Johnson

General Taylor: I don’t know. There’s several Johnson’s.

Senator Schweiker: Isn’t he in the Joint Chiefs of Staff?

General Taylor: Senator he’s.....this is thirteen years ago, there are too many Johnson’s, too many years have passed by, I don’t know.

The Chairman: General would you like to take a recess for a minute?

General Taylor: Well, I’m very happy Senator, if you gentlemen want to take a break.

(Discussion off the record.)

(A brief recess was taken.)

page 69

Senator Mondale: But its also true am I not correct, in that when he [Helms] said that, he did not produce any evidence.

Senator Baker: Absolutely.

Senator Mondale: It has been further directly testified that Helm’s and Harvey agreed not to tell McCone what they were doing.

Senator Baker: Just as apparently no one told Taylor. So it may be that the most important thing we can do is to find out who did not tell things.

Schwartz: All right.

Now the final Exhibit, Lansdale 11, Stamped 1101, which is signed by a man called McManus, who was Mr. Helms Executive Assistant, and its dated November 5, 1962. And I represent to the Commitee that Mr. McManus was Mr. Helms Executive Assistant. It does not so show on the memorandum.

excerpts pages 85-86

Senator Matthias: In your review of the Bay of Pigs incident General, did you ever find out where Senator Keating got his information?

General Taylor: I never did. He drove us nuts you know, telling us about the missiles, and it turned out to be right, and it was very embarrassing, I would say.

The Chairman: If we knew, we might substitute his source for the CIA.

Senator Matthias: Well in assessing the work of the CIA, that would be very interesting.

General Taylor: John McCone made some prediction that that might happen, but he made without any background that would get his colleagues to take it seriously.

Robert: page 86 Is the last page of General Taylor’s Testimony material following his deposition till page 133 are exhibits and memorandums, which in my opinion certain segments of which, are as interesting as General Taylor’s Depo Testimony itself. It is in this section that contains McManus memorandum referenced in this excerpt of Taylor’s deposition.

Who was the General Johnson which the commitee asked General Taylor about, at first glance, it would seem apparent that it was Brigardier General Charles E. Johnson. At first I kept thinking of Deputy Undersecretary of State Alexis U. Johnson, but his position was in the State Department.

It was difficult to determine the issue of who Robert Kennedy was meeting with at 9:30 in the time period specified in General Taylor’s testimony. While the seemingly obvious person would be Brigadier General Charles E . Johnson, I was hard pressed to discover any confirmation that he was the person who met with Robert Kennedy during this period of the JFK Presidency. In 1964, it appears that a Charles E. Johnson, was a member of the National Security Council staff with primary responsibility for national security issues.1

On the other hand Alexis U. Johnson also sat in on EXCOMM meetings,2 and would seem to be a more likely candidate for a person who would have met with Robert Kennedy, in the time specified, but he was not a Brigadier General. An additional fact concerning Alexis U Johnson, is that he was “chairman of the NSAM 156 Committee, with Raymond L. Garthoff, the Executive Asssistant.3

1 See http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/frus/johnsonlb/x/10328.htm

See

DISPATCH-LETTER TO BRIGADIER GENERAL CHARLES E. JOHNSON FROM PASSAVOY DATED 24 OCTOBER 1962.

See NARA

http://www.nara.gov/cgi-bin/starfinder/23459/jfksnew.txt

2 http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/people/ex-comm.html

also see (Kennedy Library, National Security Files, Vietnam Country Series, Honolulul Meeting, Briefing Book 11/20/63 A)

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...p;relPageId=634

http://www.jfklibrary.org/Historical+Resou...a_cleveland.htm

3. See page 154, A Journey Through the Cold War By Raymond L. Garthoff, Brookings Institution.

http://books.google.com/books?id=hlN9YxUg8...pg=PA143&dq

Thanks for that Robert,

There's a lot of interesting information there. Taylor was brought in by JFK after the Bay of Pigs, and was made chairman of the JCS, certainly rubbing those already there the wrong way - ala LeMay, Leimeitzer, et al.

Then there's Mongoose directors - Lansdale, Harvey, Hurwitch, Ryan and Gen. Johnson.

I'm pretty sure you have the right Johnson pegged as Gen. Charles E. Johnson. Is there anything more on him?

It's also interesting that Taylor goes out of his way to make note of the fact that he not only didn't think much of Lansdale's dirty tricks, but that Lansale had direct contact with RFK without going through channels.

It wasn't long after RFK and Lemieitzer "Augumented" the Cuban Committee and began holding daily 9:30 am meetings before Lemeitzer was gone when Northwoods was rejected, and Lansdale and Harvey were replaced by Des Fitzgerald.

While the Dealey Plaza operation probably grew out of Mongoose in 1962, I think the maritime operations out of Flordia in April, June and November are more directly connected to DP and thus more significant.

We also know from the Des Fitz briefing of the JCS that Taylor was preoccupied by Vietnam in late 1963, and Gen. LeMay had assumed acting chair of JCS and was chair of the key JCS meetings that delt with the DOD support for the CIA's maritime raiders.

BK

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Bill:

FWTW.....

B..

NARA Record Number: 202-10002-10038

CUBA

General Taylor papers

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=1

B, that appears to be National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy, General. Taylor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, JFK POTUS and Gen. Andrew Jackson looking over their shoulder.

Merci Bouchoups,

BK

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Bill:

FWTW.....

B..

NARA Record Number: 202-10002-10038

CUBA

General Taylor papers

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=1

B, that appears to be National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy, General. Taylor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, JFK POTUS and Gen. Andrew Jackson looking over their shoulder.

Merci Bouchoups,

BK

**********

Bill :

I noticed old Andy perhaps having a listen to every word, oh if portraits could only talk... what secrets we would know....and

perhaps some truths.... :blink:

That is S of D Robert McNamara , Taylor and JFK....I did mean to ID them......

Here he is also below.....Oct, 12/61.........also one of George McBundy......

Tres Bien...

B......

Edited by Bernice Moore
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Bill:

FWTW.....

B..

NARA Record Number: 202-10002-10038

CUBA

General Taylor papers

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=1

B, that appears to be National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy, General. Taylor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, JFK POTUS and Gen. Andrew Jackson looking over their shoulder.

Merci Bouchoups,

BK

**********

Bill :

I noticed old Andy perhaps having a listen to every word, oh if portraits could only talk... what secrets we would know....and

perhaps some truths.... :blink:

That is S of D Robert McNamara , Taylor and JFK....I did mean to ID them......

Here he is also below.....Oct, 12/61.........also one of George McBundy......

Tres Bien...

B......

The thought I have relating to the whole procedural chain of events regarding the early 70's revelations of the Castro assassination plots, the subsequent Church Committee, which led progressed to the HSCA, is that this dynamic has a very bitter side to those researching the assassination of JFK, in that most of the major names, Kennedy Administration officials Bundy, Rostow etc., JCS members were for the most part deposed in the Church Committee Era, whereas in a perfect world, they all should have been deposed in the HSCA period, the obvious point being the questions they were asked were at the time pertinent practically only to the Castro assassination plots and not to the possibility that the assassination had some involvement in the very structure the aforementioned were part of, in light of missing documents, See HSCA Final Report, that was very advantageous to those being deposed in the era of the Church Committee, if indeed there was any fire along with the smoke. Obviously, there are many, myself included that feel that fact is incontrovertible.

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  • 5 weeks later...
Bill:

FWTW.....

B..

NARA Record Number: 202-10002-10038

CUBA

General Taylor papers

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=1

B, that appears to be National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy, General. Taylor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, JFK POTUS and Gen. Andrew Jackson looking over their shoulder.

Merci Bouchoups,

BK

**********

Bill :

I noticed old Andy perhaps having a listen to every word, oh if portraits could only talk... what secrets we would know....and

perhaps some truths.... :blink:

That is S of D Robert McNamara , Taylor and JFK....I did mean to ID them......

Here he is also below.....Oct, 12/61.........also one of George McBundy......

Tres Bien...

B......

The thought I have relating to the whole procedural chain of events regarding the early 70's revelations of the Castro assassination plots, the subsequent Church Committee, which led progressed to the HSCA, is that this dynamic has a very bitter side to those researching the assassination of JFK, in that most of the major names, Kennedy Administration officials Bundy, Rostow etc., JCS members were for the most part deposed in the Church Committee Era, whereas in a perfect world, they all should have been deposed in the HSCA period, the obvious point being the questions they were asked were at the time pertinent practically only to the Castro assassination plots and not to the possibility that the assassination had some involvement in the very structure the aforementioned were part of, in light of missing documents, See HSCA Final Report, that was very advantageous to those being deposed in the era of the Church Committee, if indeed there was any fire along with the smoke. Obviously, there are many, myself included that feel that fact is incontrovertible.

Regarding this thread, many researchers are probably not aware of the following URL. It probably could be helpful in seeking additional information on various topics of interest, possibly including Joint Chiefs of Staff supplementary information re Vietnam et cetera....

http://www.ndu.edu/library/taylor/taylorppr.html

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