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I would like to see if the Museum ever bothers to explain anomalies regarding 1963.

One such example might be phrased as what happened with the people mentioned in

the following document.

It is from Joe Backes 10th Batch series

Document # 180-10089-10262 is a 6 page report dated 09/20/63. It is titled "President Kennedy's attendance Milford, PA and Stewart Air Force Base on September 24, 1963." This is the start of the Midwest tour! This originates from the Warren Commission. There are two HSCA routing slips here. One is dated 3/14/78. It has handwritten on it "S.S. Report - JFK Attendance at Pinchot Institute for Conversation Studies. Rowley, James JFK - Itinerary for trip." The second "S.S. Report - JFK trip to Las Vegas Conversation Center Itinerary. JFK - trip to Miami."

This last one has team #4 encircled.

This survey was conducted by SA Ernest E. Olsson, SAIC Robert Powis, and SA Alfred Wong on September 17-20, 1963.

Security was handled by the Pennsylvania State Police, the U.S. Forest Service, Special Fire Police from Milford, PA and surrounding communities, and Agents of this Service.

At Stewart Air Force Base, N.Y. the U.S. Air Force and Agents of this Service will effect the President's security. Only authorized personnel with reason to be present will be allowed near the Presidential area.

At the Pinchot Estate, security will be placed in effect at 10:00 A.M. on September 24, 1963.

All personnel having access to immediate Presidential areas will be identified as follows.

Forrest Service Officers not in uniform - green lapel badge imprinted with bearer's name

Fire equipment personnel - red lapel badge imprinted with bearer's name.

Pennsylvania State police - plain clothes detail - tan lapel clips.

Agents of this Service will wear their distinctive lapel pins.

Speaker's platform guests will wear a white lapel badge imprinted with bearer's name.

SAIC of the Protective Research Service indicated that there were no known subjects in this area at this time.

Inquiry in Milford revealed that one Gifford C. Emery is a member of the Neo-Nazi party of George Lincoln Rockwell; that he has two brothers names Bruce and James. All three are presently employed as laborers by the Forest Service on the Pinchot Estate and during the past week have been working in the immediate vicinity of Grey Towers. The work was suspended for the day and if they entered with the general public they were to be kept under close observation. The above was told to the PRS by telephone on September 19, 1963.

SAIC Behn rode in the Presidential limousine on all movements and will remain in close proximity to the President at all times.

All activities of the press and photographers will be controlled by Mr. Salinger and Mr. Hatcher.

There were 232 people involved in security for the President on this trip, only 12 of whom were Secret Service.

The following people participated in this survey,

Major John J. Pezzent.

Capt. Vincent R. Scolere

Lt. Norman P. McFadden

Sgt. Harold W. Casper

Mr. Frederick Herbst, chief, Milford Fire Police

Mr. Ross Stump, Chief, Branch of Operations, Regional Office, U.S. Forest Service, Upper Darby, Pa.

Col. Lancaster, Base Commander, Stewart Air Force Base.

Lt. Col. S.A. Steere, Director of Operations, Stewart Air Force Base.

Mr. Paul deForrest, Commander, OSI, Stewart Air Force Base.

Gerald Behn approved and signed.

Interesting

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Guest Tom Scully

Robert,

The article at this link describes the president's itinerary for the Milford, PA appearance on 24 Sept., 1963.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=hmkUAAAAIBAJ&sjid=PQEEAAAAIBAJ&pg=4757,3355453&dq=stewart+helicopter+president+pinchot+milford&hl=en

I just read an 24, Sept., article that appeared in the nearby Stroudsburg, PA newspaper. It goes into details such as

the plan to search every building on the Pinchot estate in the early hours before the JFK appearance, and that some boards on the speaker's platform were not going to be nailed down until a final inspection, just before the president

arrived. I'll clip the article and post it if there is interest, but I think I've covered the pertinent points.

The Pinchot estate was the girlhood home of Mary Pinchot Meyer.

Robert, I am very familiar with that area. JFK's entire appearance was less than an hour. The article mentions he was

scheduled to appear at 4:00 pm in Wisconsin.

JFK landed at Stewart AFB in a jet aircraft and transferred to a helicopter to fly a distance that would cover about

sixty miles over the road. Stewart AFB is about ten miles from the City of Newburgh, and there is a sparse population near the base, even today. It was planned for JFK's helicopter to land near the speaker's stand at the Pinchot estate. He was to speak and pull a cord to drop a curtain to unveil a granite monument, then he was to tour the mansion to officially open it to the public, and say good bye and fly off in his helicopter. The article stated that he would not see the nearby town of Milford. It did not appear that he traveled in a limousine at all in that appearance.

The point of my posting is that the Milford, PA trip was probably as easy as the security planning and protection for any presidential appearance ever got. Maybe the record of the advance planning is so thorough because it was more about including all of the local security who wanted to become involved, and not about what would be needed to adequately secure the area and protect the president. The Dallas - Fort Worth appearances seem impossible to manage to the degree that the security for the Milford, PA trip was managed, so maybe the SS went about the planning for a trip like Dallas in a less meticulous way, and then exaggerated the "less" and used the acceptance by those involved that it was impossible on a trip like that to cover all of the bases, to not cover many of them at all.

What did thorough entail back then, on a trip like Dallas? Did it ever include welding manhole covers shut, removing mailboxes along the motorcade route, searching every building along the route, ordering all upper floors windows closed, putting snipers and spotters on the roofs?

JFK came through my town in October of '62. My mother drove us down to a spot on the published motorcade route where we could get out of our car, and stand at the curb and watch and wait. There were people lined one or two deep along the two lane, double yellow lined, state highway. There was no security for crowd control, and after a short wait, along came an open convertible with JFK sitting in the back seat; it was not a limousine. There were no motorcycle escorts alongside, but there were in line in the motorcade. The car JFK rode in sped past us at about 40 mph, and it did not slow for the traffic light at the intersection at the next block.

I recently read an archived article reporting on that trip. Arriving at 4:22 pm aboard a DC-6, the president was met by a crowd of 10,000 and about 30 SS men were present to provide the president with security, along with about 100 local police at the airport arrival, 20 minute speak and greet, until the departure by motorcade on a 60 mile, 3hr. 45 min. tour through the state. When he arrived at the airport, a young blind, recent college graduate tried to present a letter to JFK requesting help to change federal employment eligibility policies towards the blind. Despite several pleas from members of the blind man's party, his request to approach the president was refused. He ended up giving the letter to the mayor to present to the president. Speaking to an estimated 45,000 gathered in Waterbury, Kennedy received a warm, enthusiastic welcome all along the motorcade route. His progress fell behind schedule and much of the route was traveled in darkness, and many built small fires along the roads in the darkness as they waited. JFK stopped at a produce stand he had visited during the 1960 campaign and accepted a gift of apples. Not until JFK reached the Yale University campus later in the evening, did his reception turn negative with sustained booing and heckling as he arrived and then tried to speak over the booing to the crowd of 30,000 gathered in the center of New Haven.

Edited by Tom Scully
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Robert,

The article at this link describes the president's itinerary for the Milford, PA appearance on 24 Sept., 1963.

http://news.google.c...t+milford&hl=en

I just read an 24, Sept., article that appeared in the nearby Stroudsburg, PA newspaper. It goes into details such as

the plan to search every building on the Pinchot estate in the early hours before the JFK appearance, and that some boards on the speaker's platform were not going to be nailed down until a final inspection, just before the president

arrived. I'll clip the article and post it if there is interest, but I think I've covered the pertinent points.

The Pinchot estate was the girlhood home of Mary Pinchot Meyer.

Robert, I am very familiar with that area. JFK's entire appearance was less than an hour. The article mentions he was

scheduled to appear at 4:00 pm in Wisconsin.

JFK landed at Stewart AFB in a jet aircraft and transferred to a helicopter to fly a distance that would cover about

sixty miles over the road. Stewart AFB is about ten miles from the City of Newburgh, and there is a sparse population near the base, even today. It was planned for JFK's helicopter to land near the speaker's stand at the Pinchot estate. He was to speak and pull a cord to drop a curtain to unveil a granite monument, then he was to tour the mansion to officially open it to the public, and say good bye and fly off in his helicopter. The article stated that he would not see the nearby town of Milford. It did not appear that he traveled in a limousine at all in that appearance.

The point of my posting is that the Milford, PA trip was probably as easy as the security planning and protection for any presidential appearance ever got. Maybe the record of the advance planning is so thorough because it was more about including all of the local security who wanted to become involved, and not about what would be needed to adequately secure the area and protect the president. The Dallas - Fort Worth appearances seem impossible to manage to the degree that the security for the Milford, PA trip was managed, so maybe the SS went about the planning for a trip like Dallas in a less meticulous way, and then exaggerated the "less" and used the acceptance by those involved that it was impossible on a trip like that to cover all of the bases, to not cover many of them at all.

What did thorough entail back then, on a trip like Dallas? Did it ever include welding manhole covers shut, removing mailboxes along the motorcade route, searching every building along the route, ordering all upper floors windows closed, putting snipers and spotters on the roofs?

JFK came through my town in October of '62. My mother drove us down to a spot on the published motorcade route where we could get out of our car, and stand at the curb and watch and wait. There were people lined one or two deep along the two lane, double yellow lined, state highway. There was no security for crowd control, and after a short wait, along came an open convertible with JFK sitting in the back seat; it was not a limousine. There were no motorcycle escorts alongside, but there were in line in the motorcade. The car JFK rode in sped past us at about 40 mph, and it did not slow for the traffic light at the intersection at the next block.

I recently read an archived article reporting on that trip. Arriving at 4:22 pm aboard a DC-6, the president was met by a crowd of 10,000 and about 30 SS men were present to provide the president with security, along with about 100 local police at the airport arrival, 20 minute speak and greet, until the departure by motorcade on a 60 mile, 3hr. 45 min. tour through the state. When he arrived at the airport, a young blind, recent college graduate tried to present a letter to JFK requesting help to change federal employment eligibility policies towards the blind. Despite several pleas from members of the blind man's party, his request to approach the president was refused. He ended up giving the letter to the mayor to present to the president. Speaking to an estimated 45,000 gathered in Waterbury, Kennedy received a warm, enthusiastic welcome all along the motorcade route. His progress fell behind schedule and much of the route was traveled in darkness, and many built small fires along the roads in the darkness as they waited. JFK stopped at a produce stand he had visited during the 1960 campaign and accepted a gift of apples. Not until JFK reached the Yale University campus later in the evening, did his reception turn negative with sustained booing and heckling as he arrived and then tried to speak over the booing to the crowd of 30,000 gathered in the center of New Haven.

http://jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com/2009/12/jfk-and-mary-p-meyer.html

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