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The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Search and Release of ONI Assassination Records

LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike USN – ARRB ONI Files

The package came in the mail from an anonymous source. It contained copies of official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and JFK Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) documents concering the Review Board's request for ONI records related to the assassination of President Kennedy ordered released by the JFK Act of 1992.

The documents refer to official requests for records made by the ARRB and the response of the ONI, specifically ONI records officer Lieutenant Commander DR Florence "Terri" Pike, USNR, who was originally assigned to respond to the ARRB requests for ONI records.....

Continued in full at: JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Additional Highlights:

After these requests were officially made on November 14, 1995, the Director of ONI responded on Nov. 27 by letter stating that "the Office of Naval Intelligence holds no records responsive to the tasking of 14 Nov..," but that didn't satisfy the ARRB. Then months went by without a response and eventually some ONI records officers were assigned the task of responding to the ARRB requests, including LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike and LCDR Paul Dootlittle. A March 3, 1997 – ARRB memo notes that "LCDR Pike is our main point of contactin the ONI records review. She works for the Information Management Department," and a Meeting Report on the Disposition of ONI, NCIS Records, by Christopher Barger/ARRB staff reports that they "met with the ONI team responsible for heading the search for records under the JFK Act. This team is directed by Lieut. Cmdr. Terri Pike; LCDR Doolittle works in the ONI FOIA office; Pike reports to Capt. Peiaec; LCRD Bastein is the JAG."

"For reason not entirely clear to either the ONI team or ARRB," Barger notes,"the tasking for this project only trickled down to them on Friday, March 7,1997. They were a little confused as to why they were only being tasked with this now, but expressed a willingness to do everything they possibly could to achieve the objectives of the Act." Among other topics discussed, "...(Tim) Wray provided extract from HSCA Staff Report regarding alleged Marine Corps CID post-assassination investigation into activities of Lee Harvey Oswald, and asked for any advice or assistance they might be able to provide regarding where such records might presently be stored, if they exist. Best recommendation: personal papers of the Marine Corps Commandant, Marine Corps CID records. Subject investigation, if authentic, may have been handled outside normal investigative channels."

"...LCDR Pike identifies ONI action taken and intended searchers. Intended searches would begin at Suitland at the Federal Records Center, but would later include district offices within CONUS."

"Pike then presented us a small written briefing package detailing what they had identified that they are required to do and the process they will use to go about the review. She noted that their first priority was to identify the records collections they need to search, then determining the physical locationof the records. Most of these will be at Suitland, she said, but there will be others located in district offices round the country in locations like Chicago, Atlanta,San Francisco, New Orleans, St. Louis and Boston. They have also identified a need to determine standard subject identification codes which should cause a document to be searched, and she concluded by detailing the records disposition procedures within ONI."

"Despite the fact that they had only learned of this tasking on Friday, they had located and designated approximately 125 cubic feet of documents that directly relate to subjects we mentioned in our letter to the Navy. These willbe reviewed page by page. She anticipated being able to complete the review by the stated deadline set by the Navy and ARRB of April 30, 1997."

"In addition, she said that ONI had identified about 950 cubic feet, or approximately 2.4 million pages of records which might be related to the topics we were interested in, but that we had not specifically mentioned...LCDR Pike stressed that she, and ONI, understood that all information, even negative result, is important to our process, and that they will be providing reports on everything they search, whether relevant documents are found within or not.Pike provided us with a 'flow chart' documenting the normal records disposition process within ONI, explaining what each step of the process is and where documents go during each phase of the process. The final page of her briefing package was a sample of the 'clue sheets' being provided to each reviewer for the April 30 documents. Approximately two dozen subject headings are listed along with 'clues' or keywords for each subject, and a time window for each subject..."

In summary, the ARRB meeting report notes, "In closing, it should be reported that this team, and LCDR Pike in particular, are very impressive, they appear very much to have their act together on this project. They provided details and planning we have rarely seen from other agencies, yet they have had this project assigned to them for less than a week. They were extremely helpful, and have taken an aggressive and proactive approach to complying with the JFK Act. We can expect more impressive work from this team."

The ARRB meeting report said that, "Pike explained that most of the relevant records they found were discovered 'by accident;' that is to say, they were misfiled in boxes outside where they should have been. This is important for two reasons. 1) If they had been filed where they 'should' have been, they would have been routinely destroyed by this point, and 2) as they continue their review of the approximately 900 cu feet of records they have self-identified, they expect they might well continue to discover records of interest to us...LCDR Pike further stated that ONI remained responsible for searching an additional 950 cubic feet of records located in Suitland, Atlanta,Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco, and stated those searches were scheduled for completion during fiscal year 97..."

LCDR Pike Faxed the ARRB; indicating that she had finished a declassificationreview of the.8 cubic feet of defector records, and had prepared a page-by-pageindex of same. She indicated that transmittal of these documents would occur inthe near future.

That appears to be the beginning of the end of such cooperation and the end of LCDR Terri Pike, as there are two different copiesof this meeting report in two different typefaces, one with the first sentence of the fourth paragraph highlighted by two circles on one and completely redacted in the other. The line redacted reads: "There are a total of 18 folders of material which ONI has determined should go into the JFK collection and have earmarked for delivery to us..." Another redacted paragraph follows:"Pike said that ONI is going through review of all records covered by the EO;in most cases, they have been willing to release in full about 96% of thedocuments. She said that for the other 4% they expected that the Board has thepower to overrule them anyway, but they had to at least make the request. [Ed.Note: this implies that they might perhaps be resigned to 'losing' some of theinformation they want to protect and would not appeal a Board decision torelease some of this information.]

The redacted paragraph reads: "Pike concluded her report by suggesting that we might find more of the records we suggested we wanted in BG38 the records of the CNO. She said that currently ONI is currently organizing a review team…to look through this group…. however, ARRB staff may also wish to personally review these records for relevant material. She suggested that changes in alert status, etc. might also be found in CNOrecords..."

It appears that the main point of contention between Lt.Commander Pike and the rest of the brass at ONI are the disposition of ONI records outside of the main records storage center at Suitland.

Then the Review Board came up with some additional leads from former servicemen who had handled assassination records and requested them. ARRB staffer Doug Horne noted in a memo that, "Terri Pike called to say she had received my voice mail inquiring about an NIS-ONI post-defection investigation of Oswald at El Toro in 1959 or 1960, would do immediate some checking, and would try to fax us results of her search sometimeon Thursday of this week."

A Chronology of Key Events in ARRB-ONI Interface notes that on "...ARRB stafferDoug Horne called Terri Pike and requested that ONI look for '119 Reports'covering an alleged ONI investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald's October, 1959 defection to the Soviet Union. LCDR Pike accepted the tasking, but ARRB never received any feedback on its results."

One of the key liaisons between the ARRB and ONI, at least in the eyes of theReview Board staff, had simply disappeared.

A Memo Terri Pike sent to ARRB Military unit member Doug Horne amplified the situation when she wrote to them that, "...I was relieved from the leadership position on this project in late August (1997) by the ONI Reserve Directorate Head….As you know, it was my responsibility to identify all records required under 44 U.S.C. 2107. I felt a personal commitment to ensure this effort was conducted 'with vigor' and as thoroughly as possible..."

Another memo from Pike dated10 Nov. 97 notes that, "In its questioning to date,the ONI IG has narrowly focused on my travel requirements and has declared that the taskings of …. the Kennedy review did not include the requirement for searches for all records regardless of physical location, just those available locally."

She was charged with "fraudulent" official travel because her "tasking did not say to search regional record centers." She was accused of work and travel "fraud" in regards to the travel from DC to the remote ONI records storage centers, obviously a trumped up charge, and one designed to make sure that everyone else in similar positions don't take the same initiatives she did. In a memo Pike wrote that, "We fundamentally disagree on the project requirements. I maintain that under all taskings, the ONI is required to identify and dispose...ALL of its records, not just thoseof the former Naval Intelligence Command stored in Suitland."

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She wasdisciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

For the complete article:

JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Chronology and Notes:

JFKcountercoup: ONI Response to JFK Act

Edited by William Kelly
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The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Search and Release of ONI Assassination Records

LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike USN – ARRB ONI Files

The package came in the mail from an anonymous source. It contained copies of official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and JFK Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) documents concerning the Review Board's request for ONI records related to the assassination of President Kennedy ordered released by the JFK Act of 1992.

The documents refer to official requests for records made by the ARRB and the response of the ONI, specifically ONI records officer Lieutenant Commander DR Florence "Terri" Pike, USNR, who was originally assigned to respond to the ARRB requests for ONI records.....

Continued in full at: JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Additional Highlights:

After these requests were officially made on November 14, 1995, the Director of ONI responded on Nov. 27 by letter stating that "the Office of Naval Intelligence holds no records responsive to the tasking of 14 Nov..," but that didn't satisfy the ARRB. Then months went by without a response and eventually some ONI records officers were assigned the task of responding to the ARRB requests, including LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike and LCDR Paul Dootlittle. A March 3, 1997 – ARRB memo notes that "LCDR Pike is our main point of contactin the ONI records review. She works for the Information Management Department," and a Meeting Report on the Disposition of ONI, NCIS Records, by Christopher Barger/ARRB staff reports that they "met with the ONI team responsible for heading the search for records under the JFK Act. This team is directed by Lieut. Cmdr. Terri Pike; LCDR Doolittle works in the ONI FOIA office; Pike reports to Capt. Peiaec; LCRD Bastein is the JAG."

"For reason not entirely clear to either the ONI team or ARRB," Barger notes,"the tasking for this project only trickled down to them on Friday, March 7,1997. They were a little confused as to why they were only being tasked with this now, but expressed a willingness to do everything they possibly could to achieve the objectives of the Act." Among other topics discussed, "...(Tim) Wray provided extract from HSCA Staff Report regarding alleged Marine Corps CID post-assassination investigation into activities of Lee Harvey Oswald, and asked for any advice or assistance they might be able to provide regarding where such records might presently be stored, if they exist. Best recommendation: personal papers of the Marine Corps Commandant, Marine Corps CID records. Subject investigation, if authentic, may have been handled outside normal investigative channels."

"...LCDR Pike identifies ONI action taken and intended searchers. Intended searches would begin at Suitland at the Federal Records Center, but would later include district offices within CONUS."

"Pike then presented us a small written briefing package detailing what they had identified that they are required to do and the process they will use to go about the review. She noted that their first priority was to identify the records collections they need to search, then determining the physical locationof the records. Most of these will be at Suitland, she said, but there will be others located in district offices round the country in locations like Chicago, Atlanta,San Francisco, New Orleans, St. Louis and Boston. They have also identified a need to determine standard subject identification codes which should cause a document to be searched, and she concluded by detailing the records disposition procedures within ONI."

"Despite the fact that they had only learned of this tasking on Friday, they had located and designated approximately 125 cubic feet of documents that directly relate to subjects we mentioned in our letter to the Navy. These willbe reviewed page by page. She anticipated being able to complete the review by the stated deadline set by the Navy and ARRB of April 30, 1997."

"In addition, she said that ONI had identified about 950 cubic feet, or approximately 2.4 million pages of records which might be related to the topics we were interested in, but that we had not specifically mentioned...LCDR Pike stressed that she, and ONI, understood that all information, even negative result, is important to our process, and that they will be providing reports on everything they search, whether relevant documents are found within or not.Pike provided us with a 'flow chart' documenting the normal records disposition process within ONI, explaining what each step of the process is and where documents go during each phase of the process. The final page of her briefing package was a sample of the 'clue sheets' being provided to each reviewer for the April 30 documents. Approximately two dozen subject headings are listed along with 'clues' or keywords for each subject, and a time window for each subject..."

In summary, the ARRB meeting report notes, "In closing, it should be reported that this team, and LCDR Pike in particular, are very impressive, they appear very much to have their act together on this project. They provided details and planning we have rarely seen from other agencies, yet they have had this project assigned to them for less than a week. They were extremely helpful, and have taken an aggressive and proactive approach to complying with the JFK Act. We can expect more impressive work from this team."

The ARRB meeting report said that, "Pike explained that most of the relevant records they found were discovered 'by accident;' that is to say, they were misfiled in boxes outside where they should have been. This is important for two reasons. 1) If they had been filed where they 'should' have been, they would have been routinely destroyed by this point, and 2) as they continue their review of the approximately 900 cu feet of records they have self-identified, they expect they might well continue to discover records of interest to us...LCDR Pike further stated that ONI remained responsible for searching an additional 950 cubic feet of records located in Suitland, Atlanta,Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco, and stated those searches were scheduled for completion during fiscal year 97..."

LCDR Pike Faxed the ARRB; indicating that she had finished a declassificationreview of the.8 cubic feet of defector records, and had prepared a page-by-pageindex of same. She indicated that transmittal of these documents would occur inthe near future.

That appears to be the beginning of the end of such cooperation and the end of LCDR Terri Pike, as there are two different copiesof this meeting report in two different typefaces, one with the first sentence of the fourth paragraph highlighted by two circles on one and completely redacted in the other. The line redacted reads: "There are a total of 18 folders of material which ONI has determined should go into the JFK collection and have earmarked for delivery to us..." Another redacted paragraph follows:"Pike said that ONI is going through review of all records covered by the EO;in most cases, they have been willing to release in full about 96% of thedocuments. She said that for the other 4% they expected that the Board has thepower to overrule them anyway, but they had to at least make the request. [Ed.Note: this implies that they might perhaps be resigned to 'losing' some of theinformation they want to protect and would not appeal a Board decision torelease some of this information.]

The redacted paragraph reads: "Pike concluded her report by suggesting that we might find more of the records we suggested we wanted in BG38 the records of the CNO. She said that currently ONI is currently organizing a review team…to look through this group…. however, ARRB staff may also wish to personally review these records for relevant material. She suggested that changes in alert status, etc. might also be found in CNOrecords..."

It appears that the main point of contention between Lt.Commander Pike and the rest of the brass at ONI are the disposition of ONI records outside of the main records storage center at Suitland.

Then the Review Board came up with some additional leads from former servicemen who had handled assassination records and requested them. ARRB staffer Doug Horne noted in a memo that, "Terri Pike called to say she had received my voice mail inquiring about an NIS-ONI post-defection investigation of Oswald at El Toro in 1959 or 1960, would do immediate some checking, and would try to fax us results of her search sometimeon Thursday of this week."

A Chronology of Key Events in ARRB-ONI Interface notes that on "...ARRB stafferDoug Horne called Terri Pike and requested that ONI look for '119 Reports'covering an alleged ONI investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald's October, 1959 defection to the Soviet Union. LCDR Pike accepted the tasking, but ARRB never received any feedback on its results."

One of the key liaisons between the ARRB and ONI, at least in the eyes of theReview Board staff, had simply disappeared.

A Memo Terri Pike sent to ARRB Military unit member Doug Horne amplified the situation when she wrote to them that, "...I was relieved from the leadership position on this project in late August (1997) by the ONI Reserve Directorate Head….As you know, it was my responsibility to identify all records required under 44 U.S.C. 2107. I felt a personal commitment to ensure this effort was conducted 'with vigor' and as thoroughly as possible..."

Another memo from Pike dated10 Nov. 97 notes that, "In its questioning to date,the ONI IG has narrowly focused on my travel requirements and has declared that the taskings of …. the Kennedy review did not include the requirement for searches for all records regardless of physical location, just those available locally."

She was charged with "fraudulent" official travel because her "tasking did not say to search regional record centers." She was accused of work and travel "fraud" in regards to the travel from DC to the remote ONI records storage centers, obviously a trumped up charge, and one designed to make sure that everyone else in similar positions don't take the same initiatives she did. In a memo Pike wrote that, "We fundamentally disagree on the project requirements. I maintain that under all taskings, the ONI is required to identify and dispose...ALL of its records, not just thoseof the former Naval Intelligence Command stored in Suitland."

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She was disciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

For the complete article:

JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Chronology and Notes:

JFKcountercoup: ONI Response to JFK Act

David Lifton wrote:

This whole situation is outrageous.

First of all, these records (which Terri Pike was apparently on the brink of locating/retrieving), ought to be located and made part of the JFKCollection.

Second: Terri Pike ought to be given all manner of legal help to rectify the situation, restore her honor, etc.

I think the people who railroaded her on these obviously trumped up charges should be exposed.

Her story deserves the widest possible publicity.

I am simply astounded that anyone would flout the spirit, much less the actual provisions, of the JFK Records Act in this manner.

DSL

Edited by William Kelly
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Search and Release of ONI Assassination Records

LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike USN – ARRB ONI Files

The package came in the mail from an anonymous source. It contained copies of official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and JFK Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) documents concerning the Review Board's request for ONI records related to the assassination of President Kennedy ordered released by the JFK Act of 1992.

The documents refer to official requests for records made by the ARRB and the response of the ONI, specifically ONI records officer Lieutenant Commander DR Florence "Terri" Pike, USNR, who was originally assigned to respond to the ARRB requests for ONI records.....

Continued in full at: JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Additional Highlights:

After these requests were officially made on November 14, 1995, the Director of ONI responded on Nov. 27 by letter stating that "the Office of Naval Intelligence holds no records responsive to the tasking of 14 Nov..," but that didn't satisfy the ARRB. Then months went by without a response and eventually some ONI records officers were assigned the task of responding to the ARRB requests, including LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike and LCDR Paul Dootlittle. A March 3, 1997 – ARRB memo notes that "LCDR Pike is our main point of contactin the ONI records review. She works for the Information Management Department," and a Meeting Report on the Disposition of ONI, NCIS Records, by Christopher Barger/ARRB staff reports that they "met with the ONI team responsible for heading the search for records under the JFK Act. This team is directed by Lieut. Cmdr. Terri Pike; LCDR Doolittle works in the ONI FOIA office; Pike reports to Capt. Peiaec; LCRD Bastein is the JAG."

"For reason not entirely clear to either the ONI team or ARRB," Barger notes,"the tasking for this project only trickled down to them on Friday, March 7,1997. They were a little confused as to why they were only being tasked with this now, but expressed a willingness to do everything they possibly could to achieve the objectives of the Act." Among other topics discussed, "...(Tim) Wray provided extract from HSCA Staff Report regarding alleged Marine Corps CID post-assassination investigation into activities of Lee Harvey Oswald, and asked for any advice or assistance they might be able to provide regarding where such records might presently be stored, if they exist. Best recommendation: personal papers of the Marine Corps Commandant, Marine Corps CID records. Subject investigation, if authentic, may have been handled outside normal investigative channels."

"...LCDR Pike identifies ONI action taken and intended searchers. Intended searches would begin at Suitland at the Federal Records Center, but would later include district offices within CONUS."

"Pike then presented us a small written briefing package detailing what they had identified that they are required to do and the process they will use to go about the review. She noted that their first priority was to identify the records collections they need to search, then determining the physical locationof the records. Most of these will be at Suitland, she said, but there will be others located in district offices round the country in locations like Chicago, Atlanta,San Francisco, New Orleans, St. Louis and Boston. They have also identified a need to determine standard subject identification codes which should cause a document to be searched, and she concluded by detailing the records disposition procedures within ONI."

"Despite the fact that they had only learned of this tasking on Friday, they had located and designated approximately 125 cubic feet of documents that directly relate to subjects we mentioned in our letter to the Navy. These willbe reviewed page by page. She anticipated being able to complete the review by the stated deadline set by the Navy and ARRB of April 30, 1997."

"In addition, she said that ONI had identified about 950 cubic feet, or approximately 2.4 million pages of records which might be related to the topics we were interested in, but that we had not specifically mentioned...LCDR Pike stressed that she, and ONI, understood that all information, even negative result, is important to our process, and that they will be providing reports on everything they search, whether relevant documents are found within or not.Pike provided us with a 'flow chart' documenting the normal records disposition process within ONI, explaining what each step of the process is and where documents go during each phase of the process. The final page of her briefing package was a sample of the 'clue sheets' being provided to each reviewer for the April 30 documents. Approximately two dozen subject headings are listed along with 'clues' or keywords for each subject, and a time window for each subject..."

In summary, the ARRB meeting report notes, "In closing, it should be reported that this team, and LCDR Pike in particular, are very impressive, they appear very much to have their act together on this project. They provided details and planning we have rarely seen from other agencies, yet they have had this project assigned to them for less than a week. They were extremely helpful, and have taken an aggressive and proactive approach to complying with the JFK Act. We can expect more impressive work from this team."

The ARRB meeting report said that, "Pike explained that most of the relevant records they found were discovered 'by accident;' that is to say, they were misfiled in boxes outside where they should have been. This is important for two reasons. 1) If they had been filed where they 'should' have been, they would have been routinely destroyed by this point, and 2) as they continue their review of the approximately 900 cu feet of records they have self-identified, they expect they might well continue to discover records of interest to us...LCDR Pike further stated that ONI remained responsible for searching an additional 950 cubic feet of records located in Suitland, Atlanta,Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco, and stated those searches were scheduled for completion during fiscal year 97..."

LCDR Pike Faxed the ARRB; indicating that she had finished a declassificationreview of the.8 cubic feet of defector records, and had prepared a page-by-pageindex of same. She indicated that transmittal of these documents would occur inthe near future.

That appears to be the beginning of the end of such cooperation and the end of LCDR Terri Pike, as there are two different copiesof this meeting report in two different typefaces, one with the first sentence of the fourth paragraph highlighted by two circles on one and completely redacted in the other. The line redacted reads: "There are a total of 18 folders of material which ONI has determined should go into the JFK collection and have earmarked for delivery to us..." Another redacted paragraph follows:"Pike said that ONI is going through review of all records covered by the EO;in most cases, they have been willing to release in full about 96% of thedocuments. She said that for the other 4% they expected that the Board has thepower to overrule them anyway, but they had to at least make the request. [Ed.Note: this implies that they might perhaps be resigned to 'losing' some of theinformation they want to protect and would not appeal a Board decision torelease some of this information.]

The redacted paragraph reads: "Pike concluded her report by suggesting that we might find more of the records we suggested we wanted in BG38 the records of the CNO. She said that currently ONI is currently organizing a review team…to look through this group…. however, ARRB staff may also wish to personally review these records for relevant material. She suggested that changes in alert status, etc. might also be found in CNOrecords..."

It appears that the main point of contention between Lt.Commander Pike and the rest of the brass at ONI are the disposition of ONI records outside of the main records storage center at Suitland.

Then the Review Board came up with some additional leads from former servicemen who had handled assassination records and requested them. ARRB staffer Doug Horne noted in a memo that, "Terri Pike called to say she had received my voice mail inquiring about an NIS-ONI post-defection investigation of Oswald at El Toro in 1959 or 1960, would do immediate some checking, and would try to fax us results of her search sometimeon Thursday of this week."

A Chronology of Key Events in ARRB-ONI Interface notes that on "...ARRB stafferDoug Horne called Terri Pike and requested that ONI look for '119 Reports'covering an alleged ONI investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald's October, 1959 defection to the Soviet Union. LCDR Pike accepted the tasking, but ARRB never received any feedback on its results."

One of the key liaisons between the ARRB and ONI, at least in the eyes of theReview Board staff, had simply disappeared.

A Memo Terri Pike sent to ARRB Military unit member Doug Horne amplified the situation when she wrote to them that, "...I was relieved from the leadership position on this project in late August (1997) by the ONI Reserve Directorate Head….As you know, it was my responsibility to identify all records required under 44 U.S.C. 2107. I felt a personal commitment to ensure this effort was conducted 'with vigor' and as thoroughly as possible..."

Another memo from Pike dated10 Nov. 97 notes that, "In its questioning to date,the ONI IG has narrowly focused on my travel requirements and has declared that the taskings of …. the Kennedy review did not include the requirement for searches for all records regardless of physical location, just those available locally."

She was charged with "fraudulent" official travel because her "tasking did not say to search regional record centers." She was accused of work and travel "fraud" in regards to the travel from DC to the remote ONI records storage centers, obviously a trumped up charge, and one designed to make sure that everyone else in similar positions don't take the same initiatives she did. In a memo Pike wrote that, "We fundamentally disagree on the project requirements. I maintain that under all taskings, the ONI is required to identify and dispose...ALL of its records, not just thoseof the former Naval Intelligence Command stored in Suitland."

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She was disciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

For the complete article:

JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Chronology and Notes:

JFKcountercoup: ONI Response to JFK Act

David Lifton wrote:

This whole situation is outrageous.

First of all, these records (which Terri Pike was apparently on the brink of locating/retrieving), ought to be located and made part of the JFKCollection.

Second: Terri Pike ought to be given all manner of legal help to rectify the situation, restore her honor, etc.

I think the people who railroaded her on these obviously trumped up charges should be exposed.

Her story deserves the widest possible publicity.

I am simply astounded that anyone would flout the spirit, much less the actual provisions, of the JFK Records Act in this manner.

DSL

Bill,

Did these ONI records ever get turned over to the ARRB?

If not, are there any avenues for which they may be retrieved?

Greg

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The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Search and Release of ONI Assassination Records

LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike USN – ARRB ONI Files

The package came in the mail from an anonymous source. It contained copies of official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and JFK Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) documents concerning the Review Board's request for ONI records related to the assassination of President Kennedy ordered released by the JFK Act of 1992.

The documents refer to official requests for records made by the ARRB and the response of the ONI, specifically ONI records officer Lieutenant Commander DR Florence "Terri" Pike, USNR, who was originally assigned to respond to the ARRB requests for ONI records.....

Continued in full at: JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Additional Highlights:

After these requests were officially made on November 14, 1995, the Director of ONI responded on Nov. 27 by letter stating that "the Office of Naval Intelligence holds no records responsive to the tasking of 14 Nov..," but that didn't satisfy the ARRB. Then months went by without a response and eventually some ONI records officers were assigned the task of responding to the ARRB requests, including LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike and LCDR Paul Dootlittle. A March 3, 1997 – ARRB memo notes that "LCDR Pike is our main point of contactin the ONI records review. She works for the Information Management Department," and a Meeting Report on the Disposition of ONI, NCIS Records, by Christopher Barger/ARRB staff reports that they "met with the ONI team responsible for heading the search for records under the JFK Act. This team is directed by Lieut. Cmdr. Terri Pike; LCDR Doolittle works in the ONI FOIA office; Pike reports to Capt. Peiaec; LCRD Bastein is the JAG."

"For reason not entirely clear to either the ONI team or ARRB," Barger notes,"the tasking for this project only trickled down to them on Friday, March 7,1997. They were a little confused as to why they were only being tasked with this now, but expressed a willingness to do everything they possibly could to achieve the objectives of the Act." Among other topics discussed, "...(Tim) Wray provided extract from HSCA Staff Report regarding alleged Marine Corps CID post-assassination investigation into activities of Lee Harvey Oswald, and asked for any advice or assistance they might be able to provide regarding where such records might presently be stored, if they exist. Best recommendation: personal papers of the Marine Corps Commandant, Marine Corps CID records. Subject investigation, if authentic, may have been handled outside normal investigative channels."

"...LCDR Pike identifies ONI action taken and intended searchers. Intended searches would begin at Suitland at the Federal Records Center, but would later include district offices within CONUS."

"Pike then presented us a small written briefing package detailing what they had identified that they are required to do and the process they will use to go about the review. She noted that their first priority was to identify the records collections they need to search, then determining the physical locationof the records. Most of these will be at Suitland, she said, but there will be others located in district offices round the country in locations like Chicago, Atlanta,San Francisco, New Orleans, St. Louis and Boston. They have also identified a need to determine standard subject identification codes which should cause a document to be searched, and she concluded by detailing the records disposition procedures within ONI."

"Despite the fact that they had only learned of this tasking on Friday, they had located and designated approximately 125 cubic feet of documents that directly relate to subjects we mentioned in our letter to the Navy. These willbe reviewed page by page. She anticipated being able to complete the review by the stated deadline set by the Navy and ARRB of April 30, 1997."

"In addition, she said that ONI had identified about 950 cubic feet, or approximately 2.4 million pages of records which might be related to the topics we were interested in, but that we had not specifically mentioned...LCDR Pike stressed that she, and ONI, understood that all information, even negative result, is important to our process, and that they will be providing reports on everything they search, whether relevant documents are found within or not.Pike provided us with a 'flow chart' documenting the normal records disposition process within ONI, explaining what each step of the process is and where documents go during each phase of the process. The final page of her briefing package was a sample of the 'clue sheets' being provided to each reviewer for the April 30 documents. Approximately two dozen subject headings are listed along with 'clues' or keywords for each subject, and a time window for each subject..."

In summary, the ARRB meeting report notes, "In closing, it should be reported that this team, and LCDR Pike in particular, are very impressive, they appear very much to have their act together on this project. They provided details and planning we have rarely seen from other agencies, yet they have had this project assigned to them for less than a week. They were extremely helpful, and have taken an aggressive and proactive approach to complying with the JFK Act. We can expect more impressive work from this team."

The ARRB meeting report said that, "Pike explained that most of the relevant records they found were discovered 'by accident;' that is to say, they were misfiled in boxes outside where they should have been. This is important for two reasons. 1) If they had been filed where they 'should' have been, they would have been routinely destroyed by this point, and 2) as they continue their review of the approximately 900 cu feet of records they have self-identified, they expect they might well continue to discover records of interest to us...LCDR Pike further stated that ONI remained responsible for searching an additional 950 cubic feet of records located in Suitland, Atlanta,Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco, and stated those searches were scheduled for completion during fiscal year 97..."

LCDR Pike Faxed the ARRB; indicating that she had finished a declassificationreview of the.8 cubic feet of defector records, and had prepared a page-by-pageindex of same. She indicated that transmittal of these documents would occur inthe near future.

That appears to be the beginning of the end of such cooperation and the end of LCDR Terri Pike, as there are two different copiesof this meeting report in two different typefaces, one with the first sentence of the fourth paragraph highlighted by two circles on one and completely redacted in the other. The line redacted reads: "There are a total of 18 folders of material which ONI has determined should go into the JFK collection and have earmarked for delivery to us..." Another redacted paragraph follows:"Pike said that ONI is going through review of all records covered by the EO;in most cases, they have been willing to release in full about 96% of thedocuments. She said that for the other 4% they expected that the Board has thepower to overrule them anyway, but they had to at least make the request. [Ed.Note: this implies that they might perhaps be resigned to 'losing' some of theinformation they want to protect and would not appeal a Board decision torelease some of this information.]

The redacted paragraph reads: "Pike concluded her report by suggesting that we might find more of the records we suggested we wanted in BG38 the records of the CNO. She said that currently ONI is currently organizing a review team…to look through this group…. however, ARRB staff may also wish to personally review these records for relevant material. She suggested that changes in alert status, etc. might also be found in CNOrecords..."

It appears that the main point of contention between Lt.Commander Pike and the rest of the brass at ONI are the disposition of ONI records outside of the main records storage center at Suitland.

Then the Review Board came up with some additional leads from former servicemen who had handled assassination records and requested them. ARRB staffer Doug Horne noted in a memo that, "Terri Pike called to say she had received my voice mail inquiring about an NIS-ONI post-defection investigation of Oswald at El Toro in 1959 or 1960, would do immediate some checking, and would try to fax us results of her search sometimeon Thursday of this week."

A Chronology of Key Events in ARRB-ONI Interface notes that on "...ARRB stafferDoug Horne called Terri Pike and requested that ONI look for '119 Reports'covering an alleged ONI investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald's October, 1959 defection to the Soviet Union. LCDR Pike accepted the tasking, but ARRB never received any feedback on its results."

One of the key liaisons between the ARRB and ONI, at least in the eyes of theReview Board staff, had simply disappeared.

A Memo Terri Pike sent to ARRB Military unit member Doug Horne amplified the situation when she wrote to them that, "...I was relieved from the leadership position on this project in late August (1997) by the ONI Reserve Directorate Head….As you know, it was my responsibility to identify all records required under 44 U.S.C. 2107. I felt a personal commitment to ensure this effort was conducted 'with vigor' and as thoroughly as possible..."

Another memo from Pike dated10 Nov. 97 notes that, "In its questioning to date,the ONI IG has narrowly focused on my travel requirements and has declared that the taskings of …. the Kennedy review did not include the requirement for searches for all records regardless of physical location, just those available locally."

She was charged with "fraudulent" official travel because her "tasking did not say to search regional record centers." She was accused of work and travel "fraud" in regards to the travel from DC to the remote ONI records storage centers, obviously a trumped up charge, and one designed to make sure that everyone else in similar positions don't take the same initiatives she did. In a memo Pike wrote that, "We fundamentally disagree on the project requirements. I maintain that under all taskings, the ONI is required to identify and dispose...ALL of its records, not just thoseof the former Naval Intelligence Command stored in Suitland."

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She was disciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

For the complete article:

JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Chronology and Notes:

JFKcountercoup: ONI Response to JFK Act

David Lifton wrote:

This whole situation is outrageous.

First of all, these records (which Terri Pike was apparently on the brink of locating/retrieving), ought to be located and made part of the JFKCollection.

Second: Terri Pike ought to be given all manner of legal help to rectify the situation, restore her honor, etc.

I think the people who railroaded her on these obviously trumped up charges should be exposed.

Her story deserves the widest possible publicity.

I am simply astounded that anyone would flout the spirit, much less the actual provisions, of the JFK Records Act in this manner.

DSL

Bill,

Did these ONI records ever get turned over to the ARRB?

If not, are there any avenues for which they may be retrieved?

Greg

I don't know. Some of them are ARRB records - meeting and call reports - so they must be there, but they don't have RIF numbers, which makes me think that they were copied and saved as they were happening.

They do have review and released by NARA on them however.

I will be posting more of them as soon as I can.

BK

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. . . . . . . . . .

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She was disciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

David Lifton wrote:

This whole situation is outrageous.

First of all, these records (which Terri Pike was apparently on the brink of locating/retrieving), ought to be located and made part of the JFKCollection.

Second: Terri Pike ought to be given all manner of legal help to rectify the situation, restore her honor, etc.

I think the people who railroaded her on these obviously trumped up charges should be exposed.

Her story deserves the widest possible publicity.

I am simply astounded that anyone would flout the spirit, much less the actual provisions, of the JFK Records Act in this manner.

DSL

-----------------------------------------------------

I agree with both Bill and David regarding this travesty. It really does need to be publicized because it proves to the "Doubting Thomas's. . . et. al." out there (if any more evidence was needed) that the cover-up actively continued through the end of the the 19th Century, and, by extension since nothing has really changed, is still on-going nearly one half a century after JFK's murder. That it took two years to even begin responding to the ARRB, and then having the plug pulled for such specious reasons once someone noticed how effectively LCDR Pike was working, should prove to one and all that there are still orders out there to protect certain secrets irrespective of any laws passed by Congress. It evokes the words of James J. Angleton, that "it is inconceivable to me that a secret intelligence arm of the government has to comply with all the overt orders of the government."

Which is to say, "some of us really are above the law. . .deal with it". Evidently, that quote still represents the views of many people within the intelligence agencies at least and probably many more than we could even imagine (e.g. the inaptly named "Justice Department" and such agencies as the FBI and Secret Service, as thoroughly documented in many other cases not dissimilar to this one involving LCDR Pike.

Have you considered pursuing this with any empathetic congressmen/women or senators (assuming there are any left)? Perhaps if someone consolidated this one with some other "unresolved issues" -- e.g. Jefferson Morley's continuing FOIA request for info on Joannides and the wanton destruction of pertinent Secret Service files described by Doug Horne -- it could force a lot of unwanted attention to the actions of government officials. Maybe even someone in the media who might show some continued interest: Paradoxically, the only one I can think of right off is Bill O'Reilly, who seemed to show a lot of interest in this a decade or two ago. But it might be worth a shot.

I'll anxiously await more info from you on this as you get the opportunity.

Phil Nelson

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. . . . . . . . . .

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Pike, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She was disciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

David Lifton wrote:

This whole situation is outrageous.

First of all, these records (which Terri Pike was apparently on the brink of locating/retrieving), ought to be located and made part of the JFKCollection.

Second: Terri Pike ought to be given all manner of legal help to rectify the situation, restore her honor, etc.

I think the people who railroaded her on these obviously trumped up charges should be exposed.

Her story deserves the widest possible publicity.

I am simply astounded that anyone would flout the spirit, much less the actual provisions, of the JFK Records Act in this manner.

DSL

-----------------------------------------------------

I agree with both Bill and David regarding this travesty. It really does need to be publicized because it proves to the "Doubting Thomas's. . . et. al." out there (if any more evidence was needed) that the cover-up actively continued through the end of the the 19th Century, and, by extension since nothing has really changed, is still on-going nearly one half a century after JFK's murder. That it took two years to even begin responding to the ARRB, and then having the plug pulled for such specious reasons once someone noticed how effectively LCDR Pike was working, should prove to one and all that there are still orders out there to protect certain secrets irrespective of any laws passed by Congress. It evokes the words of James J. Angleton, that "it is inconceivable to me that a secret intelligence arm of the government has to comply with all the overt orders of the government."

Which is to say, "some of us really are above the law. . .deal with it". Evidently, that quote still represents the views of many people within the intelligence agencies at least and probably many more than we could even imagine (e.g. the inaptly named "Justice Department" and such agencies as the FBI and Secret Service, as thoroughly documented in many other cases not dissimilar to this one involving LCDR Pike.

Have you considered pursuing this with any empathetic congressmen/women or senators (assuming there are any left)? Perhaps if someone consolidated this one with some other "unresolved issues" -- e.g. Jefferson Morley's continuing FOIA request for info on Joannides and the wanton destruction of pertinent Secret Service files described by Doug Horne -- it could force a lot of unwanted attention to the actions of government officials. Maybe even someone in the media who might show some continued interest: Paradoxically, the only one I can think of right off is Bill O'Reilly, who seemed to show a lot of interest in this a decade or two ago. But it might be worth a shot.

I'll anxiously await more info from you on this as you get the opportunity.

Phil Nelson

Hi Phil,

I'm surprised and glad that this article has stimulated some restless souls, as there are at least a half-dozen researchers who have picked up the chase and are working on various aspects of this, though we still haven't positively located Pike, a first priority. I have located Gunn and Pike's lawyer Sheldon, but the others are pretty elusive.

As others have pointed out, this case is potentially significant because it doesn't require a belief in conspiracy in the assassination to see what's going on, and the possibility of criminal forgery is possible in some of the records, as well as perjury on the part of those who signed off on the compliance forms, and zeroing in on the records destroyed and missing.

I have started to scan and post the records here and will continue to do so, and when I'm done I'll send them off to Rex Bradford to post at Mary Ferrell.

JFKcountercoup

BK

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The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Search and Release of ONI Assassination Records

LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike USN – ARRB ONI Files

The package came in the mail from an anonymous source. It contained copies of official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and JFK Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) documents concering the Review Board's request for ONI records related to the assassination of President Kennedy ordered released by the JFK Act of 1992.

The documents refer to official requests for records made by the ARRB and the response of the ONI, specifically ONI records officer Lieutenant Commander DR Florence "Terri" Pike, USNR, who was originally assigned to respond to the ARRB requests for ONI records.....

Continued in full at: JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Additional Highlights:

After these requests were officially made on November 14, 1995, the Director of ONI responded on Nov. 27 by letter stating that "the Office of Naval Intelligence holds no records responsive to the tasking of 14 Nov..," but that didn't satisfy the ARRB. Then months went by without a response and eventually some ONI records officers were assigned the task of responding to the ARRB requests, including LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike and LCDR Paul Dootlittle. A March 3, 1997 – ARRB memo notes that "LCDR Pike is our main point of contactin the ONI records review. She works for the Information Management Department," and a Meeting Report on the Disposition of ONI, NCIS Records, by Christopher Barger/ARRB staff reports that they "met with the ONI team responsible for heading the search for records under the JFK Act. This team is directed by Lieut. Cmdr. Terri Pike; LCDR Doolittle works in the ONI FOIA office; Pike reports to Capt. Peiaec; LCRD Bastein is the JAG."

"For reason not entirely clear to either the ONI team or ARRB," Barger notes,"the tasking for this project only trickled down to them on Friday, March 7,1997. They were a little confused as to why they were only being tasked with this now, but expressed a willingness to do everything they possibly could to achieve the objectives of the Act." Among other topics discussed, "...(Tim) Wray provided extract from HSCA Staff Report regarding alleged Marine Corps CID post-assassination investigation into activities of Lee Harvey Oswald, and asked for any advice or assistance they might be able to provide regarding where such records might presently be stored, if they exist. Best recommendation: personal papers of the Marine Corps Commandant, Marine Corps CID records. Subject investigation, if authentic, may have been handled outside normal investigative channels."

"...LCDR Pike identifies ONI action taken and intended searchers. Intended searches would begin at Suitland at the Federal Records Center, but would later include district offices within CONUS."

"Pike then presented us a small written briefing package detailing what they had identified that they are required to do and the process they will use to go about the review. She noted that their first priority was to identify the records collections they need to search, then determining the physical locationof the records. Most of these will be at Suitland, she said, but there will be others located in district offices round the country in locations like Chicago, Atlanta,San Francisco, New Orleans, St. Louis and Boston. They have also identified a need to determine standard subject identification codes which should cause a document to be searched, and she concluded by detailing the records disposition procedures within ONI."

"Despite the fact that they had only learned of this tasking on Friday, they had located and designated approximately 125 cubic feet of documents that directly relate to subjects we mentioned in our letter to the Navy. These willbe reviewed page by page. She anticipated being able to complete the review by the stated deadline set by the Navy and ARRB of April 30, 1997."

"In addition, she said that ONI had identified about 950 cubic feet, or approximately 2.4 million pages of records which might be related to the topics we were interested in, but that we had not specifically mentioned...LCDR Pike stressed that she, and ONI, understood that all information, even negative result, is important to our process, and that they will be providing reports on everything they search, whether relevant documents are found within or not.Pike provided us with a 'flow chart' documenting the normal records disposition process within ONI, explaining what each step of the process is and where documents go during each phase of the process. The final page of her briefing package was a sample of the 'clue sheets' being provided to each reviewer for the April 30 documents. Approximately two dozen subject headings are listed along with 'clues' or keywords for each subject, and a time window for each subject..."

In summary, the ARRB meeting report notes, "In closing, it should be reported that this team, and LCDR Pike in particular, are very impressive, they appear very much to have their act together on this project. They provided details and planning we have rarely seen from other agencies, yet they have had this project assigned to them for less than a week. They were extremely helpful, and have taken an aggressive and proactive approach to complying with the JFK Act. We can expect more impressive work from this team."

The ARRB meeting report said that, "Pike explained that most of the relevant records they found were discovered 'by accident;' that is to say, they were misfiled in boxes outside where they should have been. This is important for two reasons. 1) If they had been filed where they 'should' have been, they would have been routinely destroyed by this point, and 2) as they continue their review of the approximately 900 cu feet of records they have self-identified, they expect they might well continue to discover records of interest to us...LCDR Pike further stated that ONI remained responsible for searching an additional 950 cubic feet of records located in Suitland, Atlanta,Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco, and stated those searches were scheduled for completion during fiscal year 97..."

LCDR Pike Faxed the ARRB; indicating that she had finished a declassificationreview of the.8 cubic feet of defector records, and had prepared a page-by-pageindex of same. She indicated that transmittal of these documents would occur inthe near future.

That appears to be the beginning of the end of such cooperation and the end of LCDR Terri Pike, as there are two different copiesof this meeting report in two different typefaces, one with the first sentence of the fourth paragraph highlighted by two circles on one and completely redacted in the other. The line redacted reads: "There are a total of 18 folders of material which ONI has determined should go into the JFK collection and have earmarked for delivery to us..." Another redacted paragraph follows:"Pike said that ONI is going through review of all records covered by the EO;in most cases, they have been willing to release in full about 96% of thedocuments. She said that for the other 4% they expected that the Board has thepower to overrule them anyway, but they had to at least make the request. [Ed.Note: this implies that they might perhaps be resigned to 'losing' some of theinformation they want to protect and would not appeal a Board decision torelease some of this information.]

The redacted paragraph reads: "Pike concluded her report by suggesting that we might find more of the records we suggested we wanted in BG38 the records of the CNO. She said that currently ONI is currently organizing a review team…to look through this group…. however, ARRB staff may also wish to personally review these records for relevant material. She suggested that changes in alert status, etc. might also be found in CNOrecords..."

It appears that the main point of contention between Lt.Commander Pike and the rest of the brass at ONI are the disposition of ONI records outside of the main records storage center at Suitland.

Then the Review Board came up with some additional leads from former servicemen who had handled assassination records and requested them. ARRB staffer Doug Horne noted in a memo that, "Terri Pike called to say she had received my voice mail inquiring about an NIS-ONI post-defection investigation of Oswald at El Toro in 1959 or 1960, would do immediate some checking, and would try to fax us results of her search sometimeon Thursday of this week."

A Chronology of Key Events in ARRB-ONI Interface notes that on "...ARRB stafferDoug Horne called Terri Pike and requested that ONI look for '119 Reports'covering an alleged ONI investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald's October, 1959 defection to the Soviet Union. LCDR Pike accepted the tasking, but ARRB never received any feedback on its results."

One of the key liaisons between the ARRB and ONI, at least in the eyes of theReview Board staff, had simply disappeared.

A Memo Terri Pike sent to ARRB Military unit member Doug Horne amplified the situation when she wrote to them that, "...I was relieved from the leadership position on this project in late August (1997) by the ONI Reserve Directorate Head….As you know, it was my responsibility to identify all records required under 44 U.S.C. 2107. I felt a personal commitment to ensure this effort was conducted 'with vigor' and as thoroughly as possible..."

Another memo from Pike dated10 Nov. 97 notes that, "In its questioning to date,the ONI IG has narrowly focused on my travel requirements and has declared that the taskings of …. the Kennedy review did not include the requirement for searches for all records regardless of physical location, just those available locally."

She was charged with "fraudulent" official travel because her "tasking did not say to search regional record centers." She was accused of work and travel "fraud" in regards to the travel from DC to the remote ONI records storage centers, obviously a trumped up charge, and one designed to make sure that everyone else in similar positions don't take the same initiatives she did. In a memo Pike wrote that, "We fundamentally disagree on the project requirements. I maintain that under all taskings, the ONI is required to identify and dispose...ALL of its records, not just thoseof the former Naval Intelligence Command stored in Suitland."

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She wasdisciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

For the complete article:

JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Chronology and Notes:

JFKcountercoup: ONI Response to JFK Act

Excellent article, Bill. IMHO worthy of a bump.

--Tommy :sun

Question: Was LCDR Terri Pike a "USN" (active duty) or "USNR" (Reserve) officer? Your article says both USN and USNR. It's my impression that everyone who worked for the ONI was either a civilian or in the Navy Reserve.

Edited by Thomas Graves
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The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Search and Release of ONI Assassination Records

LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike USN – ARRB ONI Files

The package came in the mail from an anonymous source. It contained copies of official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and JFK Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) documents concering the Review Board's request for ONI records related to the assassination of President Kennedy ordered released by the JFK Act of 1992.

The documents refer to official requests for records made by the ARRB and the response of the ONI, specifically ONI records officer Lieutenant Commander DR Florence "Terri" Pike, USNR, who was originally assigned to respond to the ARRB requests for ONI records.....

Continued in full at: JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Additional Highlights:

After these requests were officially made on November 14, 1995, the Director of ONI responded on Nov. 27 by letter stating that "the Office of Naval Intelligence holds no records responsive to the tasking of 14 Nov..," but that didn't satisfy the ARRB. Then months went by without a response and eventually some ONI records officers were assigned the task of responding to the ARRB requests, including LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike and LCDR Paul Dootlittle. A March 3, 1997 – ARRB memo notes that "LCDR Pike is our main point of contactin the ONI records review. She works for the Information Management Department," and a Meeting Report on the Disposition of ONI, NCIS Records, by Christopher Barger/ARRB staff reports that they "met with the ONI team responsible for heading the search for records under the JFK Act. This team is directed by Lieut. Cmdr. Terri Pike; LCDR Doolittle works in the ONI FOIA office; Pike reports to Capt. Peiaec; LCRD Bastein is the JAG."

"For reason not entirely clear to either the ONI team or ARRB," Barger notes,"the tasking for this project only trickled down to them on Friday, March 7,1997. They were a little confused as to why they were only being tasked with this now, but expressed a willingness to do everything they possibly could to achieve the objectives of the Act." Among other topics discussed, "...(Tim) Wray provided extract from HSCA Staff Report regarding alleged Marine Corps CID post-assassination investigation into activities of Lee Harvey Oswald, and asked for any advice or assistance they might be able to provide regarding where such records might presently be stored, if they exist. Best recommendation: personal papers of the Marine Corps Commandant, Marine Corps CID records. Subject investigation, if authentic, may have been handled outside normal investigative channels."

"...LCDR Pike identifies ONI action taken and intended searchers. Intended searches would begin at Suitland at the Federal Records Center, but would later include district offices within CONUS."

"Pike then presented us a small written briefing package detailing what they had identified that they are required to do and the process they will use to go about the review. She noted that their first priority was to identify the records collections they need to search, then determining the physical locationof the records. Most of these will be at Suitland, she said, but there will be others located in district offices round the country in locations like Chicago, Atlanta,San Francisco, New Orleans, St. Louis and Boston. They have also identified a need to determine standard subject identification codes which should cause a document to be searched, and she concluded by detailing the records disposition procedures within ONI."

"Despite the fact that they had only learned of this tasking on Friday, they had located and designated approximately 125 cubic feet of documents that directly relate to subjects we mentioned in our letter to the Navy. These willbe reviewed page by page. She anticipated being able to complete the review by the stated deadline set by the Navy and ARRB of April 30, 1997."

"In addition, she said that ONI had identified about 950 cubic feet, or approximately 2.4 million pages of records which might be related to the topics we were interested in, but that we had not specifically mentioned...LCDR Pike stressed that she, and ONI, understood that all information, even negative result, is important to our process, and that they will be providing reports on everything they search, whether relevant documents are found within or not.Pike provided us with a 'flow chart' documenting the normal records disposition process within ONI, explaining what each step of the process is and where documents go during each phase of the process. The final page of her briefing package was a sample of the 'clue sheets' being provided to each reviewer for the April 30 documents. Approximately two dozen subject headings are listed along with 'clues' or keywords for each subject, and a time window for each subject..."

In summary, the ARRB meeting report notes, "In closing, it should be reported that this team, and LCDR Pike in particular, are very impressive, they appear very much to have their act together on this project. They provided details and planning we have rarely seen from other agencies, yet they have had this project assigned to them for less than a week. They were extremely helpful, and have taken an aggressive and proactive approach to complying with the JFK Act. We can expect more impressive work from this team."

The ARRB meeting report said that, "Pike explained that most of the relevant records they found were discovered 'by accident;' that is to say, they were misfiled in boxes outside where they should have been. This is important for two reasons. 1) If they had been filed where they 'should' have been, they would have been routinely destroyed by this point, and 2) as they continue their review of the approximately 900 cu feet of records they have self-identified, they expect they might well continue to discover records of interest to us...LCDR Pike further stated that ONI remained responsible for searching an additional 950 cubic feet of records located in Suitland, Atlanta,Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco, and stated those searches were scheduled for completion during fiscal year 97..."

LCDR Pike Faxed the ARRB; indicating that she had finished a declassificationreview of the.8 cubic feet of defector records, and had prepared a page-by-pageindex of same. She indicated that transmittal of these documents would occur inthe near future.

That appears to be the beginning of the end of such cooperation and the end of LCDR Terri Pike, as there are two different copiesof this meeting report in two different typefaces, one with the first sentence of the fourth paragraph highlighted by two circles on one and completely redacted in the other. The line redacted reads: "There are a total of 18 folders of material which ONI has determined should go into the JFK collection and have earmarked for delivery to us..." Another redacted paragraph follows:"Pike said that ONI is going through review of all records covered by the EO;in most cases, they have been willing to release in full about 96% of thedocuments. She said that for the other 4% they expected that the Board has thepower to overrule them anyway, but they had to at least make the request. [Ed.Note: this implies that they might perhaps be resigned to 'losing' some of theinformation they want to protect and would not appeal a Board decision torelease some of this information.]

The redacted paragraph reads: "Pike concluded her report by suggesting that we might find more of the records we suggested we wanted in BG38 the records of the CNO. She said that currently ONI is currently organizing a review team…to look through this group…. however, ARRB staff may also wish to personally review these records for relevant material. She suggested that changes in alert status, etc. might also be found in CNOrecords..."

It appears that the main point of contention between Lt.Commander Pike and the rest of the brass at ONI are the disposition of ONI records outside of the main records storage center at Suitland.

Then the Review Board came up with some additional leads from former servicemen who had handled assassination records and requested them. ARRB staffer Doug Horne noted in a memo that, "Terri Pike called to say she had received my voice mail inquiring about an NIS-ONI post-defection investigation of Oswald at El Toro in 1959 or 1960, would do immediate some checking, and would try to fax us results of her search sometimeon Thursday of this week."

A Chronology of Key Events in ARRB-ONI Interface notes that on "...ARRB stafferDoug Horne called Terri Pike and requested that ONI look for '119 Reports'covering an alleged ONI investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald's October, 1959 defection to the Soviet Union. LCDR Pike accepted the tasking, but ARRB never received any feedback on its results."

One of the key liaisons between the ARRB and ONI, at least in the eyes of theReview Board staff, had simply disappeared.

A Memo Terri Pike sent to ARRB Military unit member Doug Horne amplified the situation when she wrote to them that, "...I was relieved from the leadership position on this project in late August (1997) by the ONI Reserve Directorate Head….As you know, it was my responsibility to identify all records required under 44 U.S.C. 2107. I felt a personal commitment to ensure this effort was conducted 'with vigor' and as thoroughly as possible..."

Another memo from Pike dated10 Nov. 97 notes that, "In its questioning to date,the ONI IG has narrowly focused on my travel requirements and has declared that the taskings of …. the Kennedy review did not include the requirement for searches for all records regardless of physical location, just those available locally."

She was charged with "fraudulent" official travel because her "tasking did not say to search regional record centers." She was accused of work and travel "fraud" in regards to the travel from DC to the remote ONI records storage centers, obviously a trumped up charge, and one designed to make sure that everyone else in similar positions don't take the same initiatives she did. In a memo Pike wrote that, "We fundamentally disagree on the project requirements. I maintain that under all taskings, the ONI is required to identify and dispose...ALL of its records, not just thoseof the former Naval Intelligence Command stored in Suitland."

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She wasdisciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

For the complete article:

JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Chronology and Notes:

JFKcountercoup: ONI Response to JFK Act

Excellent article, Bill. IMHO worthy of a bump.

--Tommy :sun

Question: Was LCDR Terri Pike a "USN" (active duty) or "USNR" (Reserve) officer? Your article says both USN and USNR. It's my impression that everyone who worked for the ONI was either a civilian or in the Navy Reserve.

bumped with a question added

Edited by Thomas Graves
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The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Search and Release of ONI Assassination Records

LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike USN – ARRB ONI Files

The package came in the mail from an anonymous source. It contained copies of official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) and JFK Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) documents concering the Review Board's request for ONI records related to the assassination of President Kennedy ordered released by the JFK Act of 1992.

The documents refer to official requests for records made by the ARRB and the response of the ONI, specifically ONI records officer Lieutenant Commander DR Florence "Terri" Pike, USNR, who was originally assigned to respond to the ARRB requests for ONI records.....

Continued in full at: JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Additional Highlights:

After these requests were officially made on November 14, 1995, the Director of ONI responded on Nov. 27 by letter stating that "the Office of Naval Intelligence holds no records responsive to the tasking of 14 Nov..," but that didn't satisfy the ARRB. Then months went by without a response and eventually some ONI records officers were assigned the task of responding to the ARRB requests, including LCDR Florence "Terri" Pike and LCDR Paul Dootlittle. A March 3, 1997 – ARRB memo notes that "LCDR Pike is our main point of contactin the ONI records review. She works for the Information Management Department," and a Meeting Report on the Disposition of ONI, NCIS Records, by Christopher Barger/ARRB staff reports that they "met with the ONI team responsible for heading the search for records under the JFK Act. This team is directed by Lieut. Cmdr. Terri Pike; LCDR Doolittle works in the ONI FOIA office; Pike reports to Capt. Peiaec; LCRD Bastein is the JAG."

"For reason not entirely clear to either the ONI team or ARRB," Barger notes,"the tasking for this project only trickled down to them on Friday, March 7,1997. They were a little confused as to why they were only being tasked with this now, but expressed a willingness to do everything they possibly could to achieve the objectives of the Act." Among other topics discussed, "...(Tim) Wray provided extract from HSCA Staff Report regarding alleged Marine Corps CID post-assassination investigation into activities of Lee Harvey Oswald, and asked for any advice or assistance they might be able to provide regarding where such records might presently be stored, if they exist. Best recommendation: personal papers of the Marine Corps Commandant, Marine Corps CID records. Subject investigation, if authentic, may have been handled outside normal investigative channels."

"...LCDR Pike identifies ONI action taken and intended searchers. Intended searches would begin at Suitland at the Federal Records Center, but would later include district offices within CONUS."

"Pike then presented us a small written briefing package detailing what they had identified that they are required to do and the process they will use to go about the review. She noted that their first priority was to identify the records collections they need to search, then determining the physical locationof the records. Most of these will be at Suitland, she said, but there will be others located in district offices round the country in locations like Chicago, Atlanta,San Francisco, New Orleans, St. Louis and Boston. They have also identified a need to determine standard subject identification codes which should cause a document to be searched, and she concluded by detailing the records disposition procedures within ONI."

"Despite the fact that they had only learned of this tasking on Friday, they had located and designated approximately 125 cubic feet of documents that directly relate to subjects we mentioned in our letter to the Navy. These willbe reviewed page by page. She anticipated being able to complete the review by the stated deadline set by the Navy and ARRB of April 30, 1997."

"In addition, she said that ONI had identified about 950 cubic feet, or approximately 2.4 million pages of records which might be related to the topics we were interested in, but that we had not specifically mentioned...LCDR Pike stressed that she, and ONI, understood that all information, even negative result, is important to our process, and that they will be providing reports on everything they search, whether relevant documents are found within or not.Pike provided us with a 'flow chart' documenting the normal records disposition process within ONI, explaining what each step of the process is and where documents go during each phase of the process. The final page of her briefing package was a sample of the 'clue sheets' being provided to each reviewer for the April 30 documents. Approximately two dozen subject headings are listed along with 'clues' or keywords for each subject, and a time window for each subject..."

In summary, the ARRB meeting report notes, "In closing, it should be reported that this team, and LCDR Pike in particular, are very impressive, they appear very much to have their act together on this project. They provided details and planning we have rarely seen from other agencies, yet they have had this project assigned to them for less than a week. They were extremely helpful, and have taken an aggressive and proactive approach to complying with the JFK Act. We can expect more impressive work from this team."

The ARRB meeting report said that, "Pike explained that most of the relevant records they found were discovered 'by accident;' that is to say, they were misfiled in boxes outside where they should have been. This is important for two reasons. 1) If they had been filed where they 'should' have been, they would have been routinely destroyed by this point, and 2) as they continue their review of the approximately 900 cu feet of records they have self-identified, they expect they might well continue to discover records of interest to us...LCDR Pike further stated that ONI remained responsible for searching an additional 950 cubic feet of records located in Suitland, Atlanta,Boston, Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco, and stated those searches were scheduled for completion during fiscal year 97..."

LCDR Pike Faxed the ARRB; indicating that she had finished a declassificationreview of the.8 cubic feet of defector records, and had prepared a page-by-pageindex of same. She indicated that transmittal of these documents would occur inthe near future.

That appears to be the beginning of the end of such cooperation and the end of LCDR Terri Pike, as there are two different copiesof this meeting report in two different typefaces, one with the first sentence of the fourth paragraph highlighted by two circles on one and completely redacted in the other. The line redacted reads: "There are a total of 18 folders of material which ONI has determined should go into the JFK collection and have earmarked for delivery to us..." Another redacted paragraph follows:"Pike said that ONI is going through review of all records covered by the EO;in most cases, they have been willing to release in full about 96% of thedocuments. She said that for the other 4% they expected that the Board has thepower to overrule them anyway, but they had to at least make the request. [Ed.Note: this implies that they might perhaps be resigned to 'losing' some of theinformation they want to protect and would not appeal a Board decision torelease some of this information.]

The redacted paragraph reads: "Pike concluded her report by suggesting that we might find more of the records we suggested we wanted in BG38 the records of the CNO. She said that currently ONI is currently organizing a review team…to look through this group…. however, ARRB staff may also wish to personally review these records for relevant material. She suggested that changes in alert status, etc. might also be found in CNOrecords..."

It appears that the main point of contention between Lt.Commander Pike and the rest of the brass at ONI are the disposition of ONI records outside of the main records storage center at Suitland.

Then the Review Board came up with some additional leads from former servicemen who had handled assassination records and requested them. ARRB staffer Doug Horne noted in a memo that, "Terri Pike called to say she had received my voice mail inquiring about an NIS-ONI post-defection investigation of Oswald at El Toro in 1959 or 1960, would do immediate some checking, and would try to fax us results of her search sometimeon Thursday of this week."

A Chronology of Key Events in ARRB-ONI Interface notes that on "...ARRB stafferDoug Horne called Terri Pike and requested that ONI look for '119 Reports'covering an alleged ONI investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald's October, 1959 defection to the Soviet Union. LCDR Pike accepted the tasking, but ARRB never received any feedback on its results."

One of the key liaisons between the ARRB and ONI, at least in the eyes of theReview Board staff, had simply disappeared.

A Memo Terri Pike sent to ARRB Military unit member Doug Horne amplified the situation when she wrote to them that, "...I was relieved from the leadership position on this project in late August (1997) by the ONI Reserve Directorate Head….As you know, it was my responsibility to identify all records required under 44 U.S.C. 2107. I felt a personal commitment to ensure this effort was conducted 'with vigor' and as thoroughly as possible..."

Another memo from Pike dated10 Nov. 97 notes that, "In its questioning to date,the ONI IG has narrowly focused on my travel requirements and has declared that the taskings of …. the Kennedy review did not include the requirement for searches for all records regardless of physical location, just those available locally."

She was charged with "fraudulent" official travel because her "tasking did not say to search regional record centers." She was accused of work and travel "fraud" in regards to the travel from DC to the remote ONI records storage centers, obviously a trumped up charge, and one designed to make sure that everyone else in similar positions don't take the same initiatives she did. In a memo Pike wrote that, "We fundamentally disagree on the project requirements. I maintain that under all taskings, the ONI is required to identify and dispose...ALL of its records, not just thoseof the former Naval Intelligence Command stored in Suitland."

From the perspective of a JFK Assassination researcher, I don't know Terri Price, but just from reading these records, she's now a hero of mine.

And I want to know more, especially what became of her after she wasrailroaded by the military brass for doing her job?

She should get a medal for what she did.

From a review of the documents, it is clear that Pike was removed from her post, reprimanded, demoted, and wrongly disciplined under trumped up charges. Her career was effectively ended because she took the initiative to retrieve and catalogue ONI records pursuant to the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Review Act.

Another researcher who read the documents independently concluded, "She wasdisciplined and (probably) kicked out of the Navy solely because she traveled to ONI document storage holding locations and retrieved records, rather thanjust rely on records at her location in DC. She seems to be a genuine American hero, trying to do the right thing and getting guillotined for it. This is a shocking case that exhibits the level of abuse that can occur in ONI when that office wants to stonewall and hide records. It is also instructive to see the massive quantities of records that were destroyed prematurely and improperly, according to the records."

For the complete article:

JFKcountercoup: The Railroading of LCDR Terri Pike over Release of ONI Assassination Records

Chronology and Notes:

JFKcountercoup: ONI Response to JFK Act

Excellent article, Bill. IMHO worthy of a bump.

--Tommy :sun

Question: Was LCDR Terri Pike a "USN" (active duty) or "USNR" (Reserve) officer? Your article says both USN and USNR. It's my impression that everyone who worked for the ONI was either a civilian or in the Navy Reserve.

bumped with a question added

Good question Tommy,

From what I understand, Pike was USNR - who were given the original task of responding to ARRB requests, but because she was so eager to do her duty, they replaced her with an active command officer, and the guy who worked with her as a USNR officer was subsequently called to active command when she was repremanded and threatened with court martial for cooperating with ARRB.

She clearly tried to do the right thing and was reprimanded for it. A hero in my book.

BK

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