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Yuri Nosenko


Tim Gratz
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Roger mentioned the Nosenko movie starring Tommy Lee Jones. I have seen it and it is, IMO, a worthwhile purchase (if at a reasonable price) for anyone interested in the events of the early sixties.

Roger's point about FEDORA is telling as well. To a certain extent, there was a bureaucratic war between the CIA and the FBI over Nosenko. Because the FBI's Fedora had vouched for Nosenko, if in fact Nosenko was determined to be a "dispatched" agent, that would call into question the bona fides of Fedora.

In the event, of course, Fedora turned out to be a false defector which surely increases the questions re Nosenko.

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Tim,

Paisley's son registered at least one FOIA that I came across once.  It was my intention to look him up [along with a million other things I meant to do].  I may still see if I can locate him just to see what he learned regarding his Father.

- lee

Not much to go on... :huh:

All records on my father John Arthur Paisley, requested by Ed Paisley (JFK stuff)

http://serendipity.nofadz.com/cia/foia.html

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  • 3 years later...
The Nosenko movie starring Tommy Lee Jones (he plays a character called Steve Daley who is actually Tennent "Pete" Bagley, Deputy Chief CIA's Soviet Division and Nosenko's handler) concludes with a statement that Fedora, the FBI's mole in the Soviet UN delegation was eventually exposed (after Hoover's death) as a double agent. Fedora had originally backed up some Nosenko's statements that were later exposed to be lies. Specifically, Nosenko claimed that he was a Lieutenant Colonel (he was actually a Captain) and he claimed that he had received a cable in Geneva ordering him to return to Moscow which was the reason he gave for having to defect immediately (there was no such cable). I have not been able to locate another reference that states that Fedora was a double agent. Does anyone have information about this? (the movie, available at Netflix, is otherwise quite accurate, if incomplete).

Speaking of Bagley. He appeared before the House Select Committee and gave a strong rebuttal to John Hart's testimony (reproduced above in Tim's post). Bagley's name is not listed; he's referred to as Deputy Chief, Soviet Bloc Division, or Mr. D.C. (Vol. 12, beginning on page 571).

Fedora was the codename for Viktor Metchislavovich Lessiovski, a KGB-agent that sabotaged American intelligence agencies by supplying false information. His cover was his work as a Soviet ambassador in the United Nations' headquarters in New York. The FBI regarded Fedora as one of their most important and most productive spies ever recruited, without knowing he was actually a KGB-colonel spreading disinformation. Fedora was originally under the control of William King Harvey and had the complete backing of J. Edgar Hoover. Fedora was among the most successful Soviet KGB-agents of the Cold War, his faulty intelligence being directly communicated to the White House. On one occasion, President Nixon and Henry Kissinger unconditionally believed Fedora's false information that a complete set of the so-called Pentagon Papers had ended up on the Soviet embassy in Washington. He also played an important role in guaranteeing the authenticity of other KGB-agents who claimed to be switching sides, notably Yuri Nosenko.

In 1981, when Fedora had already returned to the Soviet Union, the FBI admitted they had been misled for more than a decade by this Soviet agent, brilliantly fulfilling his task of supplying false information.

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The Nosenko movie starring Tommy Lee Jones (he plays a character called Steve Daley who is actually Tennent "Pete" Bagley, Deputy Chief CIA's Soviet Division and Nosenko's handler) concludes with a statement that Fedora, the FBI's mole in the Soviet UN delegation was eventually exposed (after Hoover's death) as a double agent. Fedora had originally backed up some Nosenko's statements that were later exposed to be lies. Specifically, Nosenko claimed that he was a Lieutenant Colonel (he was actually a Captain) and he claimed that he had received a cable in Geneva ordering him to return to Moscow which was the reason he gave for having to defect immediately (there was no such cable). I have not been able to locate another reference that states that Fedora was a double agent. Does anyone have information about this? (the movie, available at Netflix, is otherwise quite accurate, if incomplete).

Speaking of Bagley. He appeared before the House Select Committee and gave a strong rebuttal to John Hart's testimony (reproduced above in Tim's post). Bagley's name is not listed; he's referred to as Deputy Chief, Soviet Bloc Division, or Mr. D.C. (Vol. 12, beginning on page 571).

Fedora was the codename for Viktor Metchislavovich Lessiovski, a KGB-agent that sabotaged American intelligence agencies by supplying false information. His cover was his work as a Soviet ambassador in the United Nations' headquarters in New York. The FBI regarded Fedora as one of their most important and most productive spies ever recruited, without knowing he was actually a KGB-colonel spreading disinformation. Fedora was originally under the control of William King Harvey and had the complete backing of J. Edgar Hoover. Fedora was among the most successful Soviet KGB-agents of the Cold War, his faulty intelligence being directly communicated to the White House. On one occasion, President Nixon and Henry Kissinger unconditionally believed Fedora's false information that a complete set of the so-called Pentagon Papers had ended up on the Soviet embassy in Washington. He also played an important role in guaranteeing the authenticity of other KGB-agents who claimed to be switching sides, notably Yuri Nosenko.

In 1981, when Fedora had already returned to the Soviet Union, the FBI admitted they had been misled for more than a decade by this Soviet agent, brilliantly fulfilling his task of supplying false information.

John:

I beg to differ. The ID of Fedora as Lessiovski has been shown to be wrong. He has been definitively identified by Pete Bagley, David Wise and others as Aleksey Isidorovich Kulak.

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  • 9 years later...
On 9/2/2008 at 11:49 PM, John Simkin said:

Fedora was the codename for Viktor Metchislavovich Lessiovski, a KGB-agent that sabotaged American intelligence agencies by supplying false information. His cover was his work as a Soviet ambassador in the United Nations' headquarters in New York. The FBI regarded Fedora as one of their most important and most productive spies ever recruited, without knowing he was actually a KGB-colonel spreading disinformation. Fedora was originally under the control of William King Harvey and had the complete backing of J. Edgar Hoover. Fedora was among the most successful Soviet KGB-agents of the Cold War, his faulty intelligence being directly communicated to the White House. On one occasion, President Nixon and Henry Kissinger unconditionally believed Fedora's false information that a complete set of the so-called Pentagon Papers had ended up on the Soviet embassy in Washington. He also played an important role in guaranteeing the authenticity of other KGB-agents who claimed to be switching sides, notably Yuri Nosenko.

In 1981, when Fedora had already returned to the Soviet Union, the FBI admitted they had been misled for more than a decade by this Soviet agent, brilliantly fulfilling his task of supplying false information.

John,

With all due respect, are you sure about that name?

All the websites and books I refer to say "Fedora's" name was Aleksey Kulak.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedora_(KGB_agent)

Edited by Thomas Graves
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