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Vince Palamara

MAJOR discovery- the biggest "coincidence" ever?

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2 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

Andrej, (or anyone else for that matter)

 

In his WC testimony, http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/bouhe.htm

George Bouhe said, 

"... when I came in 1939, there were absolutely only three Russian-speaking people in Dallas and they were all married people, married to Americans, and so on. So I did not, so-to-speak, associate with any Russians that might have come or gone through Dallas from 1939 to about 1950.
In 1950, approximately, a great avalanche of displaced persons came to Dallas from Europe. Among these were probably 30, 40, 50 people, native of what I would say of various parts of the former Russian Empire. By that I mean to say that they were not all Russian. They might have been Estonians, Lithuanians, Poles, Caucasians, Georgians, Armenians, and such, but we did have one thing in common and not much more, and that was the language.         (Russian I would guess)
It was a sort of constant amazement to me that these people, prayed God, for years before coming here while still sitting in various camps in Germany--they wanted to get to America, and if 1 out of 50 made a 10-cent effort to learn the English language, I did not find him."

 

Does anyone know why there would be a sudden influx of immigrants from Eastern Europe into the United States in 1950?

 

Steve Thomas

 

PS: A regiment would have between 1,000 to 2,000 men.  Without being in the same platoon, I'd be surprised if the SS Agent and Oswald knew each other.

Steve:

I am not a historian, however, I know a bit about the Eastern Europe satelites of the Soviet Union.

The strong immigration year 1950 comes logically from the developments in Europe after WW2. The war ended in 1945. Some central and eastern European countries were still democratic in the first months after the war as they were prior to break-out of WW2. Thus, these countries wished to reunite with their pre-war democracy. Unfortunately, due to the division of spheres of interests made at the Yalta conference in February 1945, the Eastern and Central European countries fell into the sphere of interest of the Soviet Union. This has been approved by other alies since the request by Soviet Union to have a shield of affiliated countries between Soviet Union and Germany appeared maybe reasonable at that time. The Soviets used the situation and installed their people, including KGB, into the governements of these countries. Although the initial free elections were not won by the Communist party in Czechoslovakia, the Communist Party was strong enough to be in the parliament and to take share in the coalition government. That governement was still a post-war government and people somehow did not fear Soviets enough because it was the Soviet Army which liberated the country, not the US. The US troops, General Patton's divisions, actually entered Czechoslovakia and could have liberated the capital Prague but they did not because they respected the results of the Yalta (Crimea) conference.

Once the communists had their share in a democratic governement, they took in the first instance the Ministry of Internal Affairs which controlled the state secret police, a Czech version of KGB. KGB supervised and trained the Czechoslovak secret police. In a quasi-democratic coup in February 1948, the members of the governement from the non-communist parties abdicated in protest of dirty tricks of the communists in hope of new elections which would end the communists' presence in the government, but which proved to be a fatal error. The now majority communist goverment, controlled by the Soviet communists, abolished the free elections, the right of free speech, dissolved the opposing political parties, abolished the right to travel abroad and return to own home country, nationalised the private enterprises and properties, and also exchanged the currency so that those who were rich before the war turned now to be equally poor as anyone else. People of holding non-communist political views weer jailed and forced to do  low-qualification jobs (e.g., a medical doctor became a window cleaner).

Those who lost their enterprises or properties, those who ended up in jail after the coup, and those who suffocated under the new regime, wanted to flee the country desperately. This was still possible during the first months of 1948. These people usually ended up in the US bases in Germany. It took months, maybe a year or two, to sort out the asylum visa to the US. After coming to US, the exiles may have first arrived to New York, and only after few months they would find the right place for themselves. Thus, 1950 is the year where logically a surge of immigrants from central and Eastern Europe could be expected in Dallas.

Each Eastern or Central Europe country had a bit different scenario of their turn-over to communism but the end result was the same, and by 1948 there was already a block of now communist alies around the Soviet Uninion. Some countries, such a the Baltic states, were simply ingested by the Soviet Union.

After some more 10-15 years, there was a young American President whom the people in the Eastern and Central Europe countries viewed as someone who would likely break down the communism by proving it completely unnecessary as the US suddenly were not a threat. It is an irony that one of the potential reasons for killing President Kennedy was that he had been soft on communism. If President Kennedy would be able to complete his work, he would actually be the biggest threat to the communism as the regime lived from fear of the U.S. imperialism.

 

Edited by Andrej Stancak
spelling errors

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2 hours ago, Andrej Stancak said:

Steve:

Those who lost their enterprises or properties, those who ended up in jail after the coup, and those who suffocated under the new regime, wanted to flee the country desperately. This was still possible during the first months of 1948. These people usually ended up in the US bases in Germany. It took months, maybe a year or two, to sort out the asylum visa to the US. After coming to US, the exiles may have first arrived to New York, and only after few months they would find the right place for themselves. Thus, 1950 is the year where logically a surge of immigrants from central and Eastern Europe could be expected in Dallas.

Andrej,

 

Thank you.

 

Steve Thomas

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