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Commemoration to JFK's Call for World Peace


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I received this email from COPA about this event taking place next week. I thought this might interest some of you who live nearer to Washington than I do!

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On June 10, 1963, just a few months before his assassination in Dallas, President John F. Kennedy gave what his aide Arthur Schleisinger, Jr. called the most important speech of his term in office. He addressed the Cold War, the nuclear arms race and the chance for world peace through detente and disarmament and a ban on testing nuclear weapons. The text is attached with commentary. This was consistent with his decision in April, 1963 to withdraw all US troops from Vietnam and his decision to explore normalizing relations with Cuba following the Cuban Missile Crisis that brought the world so close to nuclear war. All of these were reasons, in my view, for the assassination and coup d`etat that followed on November 22, and reversed those plans completely. The Coalition on Political Assassinations (COPA) holds an annual commemorative event at the plaque that marks the location of the speech, and you are welcome to attend. We will gather for a meal and discussion of our November regional meeting afterwards. Please respond if you are planning to come - John Judge

"And We Are All Mortal..."

Commemoration to JFK's Call for World Peace

Sunday, June 10, 12:00 - 1:00 pm

Commemorative Plaque

Reeves Athletic Field (west end) (entrance off New Mexico from Nebraska)

American University

4200 Nebraska Ave, NW (at Massachusetts Ave.-Ward Circle)

Washington, DC

Here are general directions to the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/

Here is a map of the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/maincampus.html

Note the athletic field at the top left. The plaque sits at the west or left end of the field, beyond the Broadcast Center and Beeghley Hall on the access road.

For Ted Sorenson's speech at AU in 2003 commemorating the event, see:

http://www.american.edu/media/speeches/Sorensen.htm

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I received this email from COPA about this event taking place next week. I thought this might interest some of you who live nearer to Washington than I do!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On June 10, 1963, just a few months before his assassination in Dallas, President John F. Kennedy gave what his aide Arthur Schleisinger, Jr. called the most important speech of his term in office. He addressed the Cold War, the nuclear arms race and the chance for world peace through detente and disarmament and a ban on testing nuclear weapons. The text is attached with commentary. This was consistent with his decision in April, 1963 to withdraw all US troops from Vietnam and his decision to explore normalizing relations with Cuba following the Cuban Missile Crisis that brought the world so close to nuclear war. All of these were reasons, in my view, for the assassination and coup d`etat that followed on November 22, and reversed those plans completely. The Coalition on Political Assassinations (COPA) holds an annual commemorative event at the plaque that marks the location of the speech, and you are welcome to attend. We will gather for a meal and discussion of our November regional meeting afterwards. Please respond if you are planning to come - John Judge

"And We Are All Mortal..."

Commemoration to JFK's Call for World Peace

Sunday, June 10, 12:00 - 1:00 pm

Commemorative Plaque

Reeves Athletic Field (west end) (entrance off New Mexico from Nebraska)

American University

4200 Nebraska Ave, NW (at Massachusetts Ave.-Ward Circle)

Washington, DC

Here are general directions to the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/

Here is a map of the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/maincampus.html

Note the athletic field at the top left. The plaque sits at the west or left end of the field, beyond the Broadcast Center and Beeghley Hall on the access road.

For Ted Sorenson's speech at AU in 2003 commemorating the event, see:

http://www.american.edu/media/speeches/Sorensen.htm

Hi Francesca,

The June 10th event at the JFK Memorial at American Univeristy began about seven years ago when it was suggested that JFK is remembered on November 22nd because of his death, and not on his birthday, like Washington, Lincoln and other presidents.

JFK's Peace Speech was an extremely significant change in policy that many believe led to his death.

The first time we did it was the largest group by far, and afterwards we adjurned to a large seminar room nearby and discussed JFK's administration and policies, a discussion led by Professor John Newman.

Sometimes there are a few dozen people, sometimes just a few, but we always do the same thing. We take turns talking about JFK and reading excerpts of his speeches and try to see how what he was saying is as meaningful today as it was then.

JFK specifically chose a group of students to be the recipient of this major speech, but afterwards he wasn't sure they understood or his message got across.

One of the more consistant participants has flown to DC from London on four occassions, while most of those do indeed live in the DC area.

John Judge has been defending this event from those who say we are cannonizing JFK, mainly liberals and even a few conspiracy advocates, some of who contend that since RFK knew of and approved of the plots to kill Castro JFK deserved to die.

I say that JFK died for a reason, political reasons, and the June 10th speech is one of those reasons and is something we should reflect on, if only for one day.

Afterwards, we are holding a COPA luncheon meeting to review efforts to get JFK Act oversight hearings in Congress, November in Dallas conference and the state of the grand jury petitions.

I hope anyone interested who can make it will be there.

Bill Kelly

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Hi Bill,

sounds like a worthwhile event. I agree - I think his peace speech' was very important in setting the tone for what strategy the US government would follow. I don't think that by remembering it with a ceremony is 'canonising' him, just recognising what impact that speech had, on people outside the US as well.

I wish I could attend. I do hope to visit Washington one of these days when time and money permits. I'm sure you will keep us all in touch with any new developments regarding the JFK Act oversight hearings and grand jury petitions.

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I received this email from COPA about this event taking place next week. I thought this might interest some of you who live nearer to Washington than I do!

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JUST A REMINEDER THAT WE WILL BE MEETING AT NOON TOMORROW - SUNDAY, JUNE 10th at the JFK Memorial at the West end of the Athletic Field on the American Univeristy campus, and having lunch afterwards.

Everyone is welcome and I hope a few members of the forum who live in the DC area can make it.

Bill Kelly

On June 10, 1963, just a few months before his assassination in Dallas, President John F. Kennedy gave what his aide Arthur Schleisinger, Jr. called the most important speech of his term in office. He addressed the Cold War, the nuclear arms race and the chance for world peace through detente and disarmament and a ban on testing nuclear weapons. The text is attached with commentary. This was consistent with his decision in April, 1963 to withdraw all US troops from Vietnam and his decision to explore normalizing relations with Cuba following the Cuban Missile Crisis that brought the world so close to nuclear war. All of these were reasons, in my view, for the assassination and coup d`etat that followed on November 22, and reversed those plans completely. The Coalition on Political Assassinations (COPA) holds an annual commemorative event at the plaque that marks the location of the speech, and you are welcome to attend. We will gather for a meal and discussion of our November regional meeting afterwards. Please respond if you are planning to come - John Judge

"And We Are All Mortal..."

Commemoration to JFK's Call for World Peace

Sunday, June 10, 12:00 - 1:00 pm

Commemorative Plaque

Reeves Athletic Field (west end) (entrance off New Mexico from Nebraska)

American University

4200 Nebraska Ave, NW (at Massachusetts Ave.-Ward Circle)

Washington, DC

Here are general directions to the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/

Here is a map of the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/maincampus.html

Note the athletic field at the top left. The plaque sits at the west or left end of the field, beyond the Broadcast Center and Beeghley Hall on the access road.

For Ted Sorenson's speech at AU in 2003 commemorating the event, see:

http://www.american.edu/media/speeches/Sorensen.htm

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Share on other sites

I received this email from COPA about this event taking place next week. I thought this might interest some of you who live nearer to Washington than I do!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On June 10, 1963, just a few months before his assassination in Dallas, President John F. Kennedy gave what his aide Arthur Schleisinger, Jr. called the most important speech of his term in office. He addressed the Cold War, the nuclear arms race and the chance for world peace through detente and disarmament and a ban on testing nuclear weapons. The text is attached with commentary. This was consistent with his decision in April, 1963 to withdraw all US troops from Vietnam and his decision to explore normalizing relations with Cuba following the Cuban Missile Crisis that brought the world so close to nuclear war. All of these were reasons, in my view, for the assassination and coup d`etat that followed on November 22, and reversed those plans completely. The Coalition on Political Assassinations (COPA) holds an annual commemorative event at the plaque that marks the location of the speech, and you are welcome to attend. We will gather for a meal and discussion of our November regional meeting afterwards. Please respond if you are planning to come - John Judge

"And We Are All Mortal..."

Commemoration to JFK's Call for World Peace

Sunday, June 10, 12:00 - 1:00 pm

Commemorative Plaque

Reeves Athletic Field (west end) (entrance off New Mexico from Nebraska)

American University

4200 Nebraska Ave, NW (at Massachusetts Ave.-Ward Circle)

Washington, DC

Here are general directions to the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/

Here is a map of the campus:

http://www.american.edu/maps/maincampus.html

Note the athletic field at the top left. The plaque sits at the west or left end of the field, beyond the Broadcast Center and Beeghley Hall on the access road.

For Ted Sorenson's speech at AU in 2003 commemorating the event, see:

http://www.american.edu/media/speeches/Sorensen.htm

Hi Francesca,

The June 10th event at the JFK Memorial at American Univeristy began about seven years ago when it was suggested that JFK is remembered on November 22nd because of his death, and not on his birthday, like Washington, Lincoln and other presidents.

JFK's Peace Speech was an extremely significant change in policy that many believe led to his death.

The first time we did it was the largest group by far, and afterwards we adjurned to a large seminar room nearby and discussed JFK's administration and policies, a discussion led by Professor John Newman.

Sometimes there are a few dozen people, sometimes just a few, but we always do the same thing. We take turns talking about JFK and reading excerpts of his speeches and try to see how what he was saying is as meaningful today as it was then.

JFK specifically chose a group of students to be the recipient of this major speech, but afterwards he wasn't sure they understood or his message got across.

One of the more consistant participants has flown to DC from London on four occassions, while most of those do indeed live in the DC area.

John Judge has been defending this event from those who say we are cannonizing JFK, mainly liberals and even a few conspiracy advocates, some of who contend that since RFK knew of and approved of the plots to kill Castro JFK deserved to die.

I say that JFK died for a reason, political reasons, and the June 10th speech is one of those reasons and is something we should reflect on, if only for one day.

Afterwards, we are holding a COPA luncheon meeting to review efforts to get JFK Act oversight hearings in Congress, November in Dallas conference and the state of the grand jury petitions.

I hope anyone interested who can make it will be there.

Bill Kelly

***********************************************************

"I say that JFK died for a reason, political reasons, and the June 10th speech is one of those reasons and is something we should reflect on, if only for one day."

Especially, in light of the fact that Kruschev made JFK's American University Speech required reading for Russian [soviet Bloc] University students' curriculum. Another "extended olive branch" which most assuredly served to put a nail in his coffin.

Edited by Terry Mauro
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"I say that JFK died for a reason, political reasons, and the June 10th speech is one of those reasons and is something we should reflect on, if only for one day"

Aye, I agree, though with a probably different, less 'popular' slant.

As one can see in reading the speech in full, Kennedy's speech is an 'argument' for a position. (I don't mean he's argumentative) He goes from the broad to the specific. The last parts are the 'kernel'. That exclusively deals with 'ones own back yard'. ie the Speech is about the indivisible relationship between 'having ones own back yard in order' before seeking to broaden into world peace. IOW the speech is essentially about Civi Rights at home.

"On June 10, 1963, just a few months before his assassination in Dallas, President John F. Kennedy gave what his aide Arthur Schleisinger, Jr. called the most important speech of his term in office. He addressed the Cold War, the nuclear arms race and the chance for world peace through detente and disarmament and a ban on testing nuclear weapons. The text is attached with commentary. This was consistent with his decision in April, 1963 to withdraw all US troops from Vietnam and his decision to explore normalizing relations with Cuba following the Cuban Missile Crisis that brought the world so close to nuclear war. All of these were reasons, in my view, for the assassination and coup d`etat that followed on November 22, and reversed those plans completely. The Coalition on Political Assassinations (COPA) holds an annual commemorative event at the plaque that marks the location of the speech, and you are welcome to attend. We will gather for a meal and discussion of our November regional meeting afterwards. Please respond if you are planning to come - John Judge"

After June 10, in the last two months prior to the assasination, after April, the Vietnamese situation changed dramatically. IOW while 'in my view' - John Judge, appears to ignore other matters. That's fine, but history, as has been pointed out else where, is not 'one dimensional'. The time of this speech coincided with the Civil Rights speech (and Medgar Evers assassination and the Walker shooting) that specificaly dealt with segregation and the time of 'waiting' which the blacks had been fed for a century being over, and a recognition of the street agitation and the need to respond positively and uphold the Supreme Courts descicions. As well at this time a number of Executive Orders were set in motion around this time to prepare the data for the formulation of the Civil Rights act of 1963.

At this time Kennedy could not have known the dramatic change that was to occur in IndoChina and on into 1964. Johnson, while a caretaker president, could not escalate until after being elected properly and then that escalation was dependent on a number of things that happened during and before Kennedy's administration.

Johnson had no guarantee he would be elected. Goldwater would have been a better Hawk. Johnsons internal conflict emerged in his dotage.

What the asassination definitely did was to stall the passage of the Civil Rights bills and allow for various important deletions and changes that compromised Kennedy's stated intent. At the same time a reinterpretation of 'individual' to encompass institutions by Hugo Black (KKK) allowed a circumvention of the intent of the bills that made it possible for educational institutions to privatise, and also claim the rights of association accorded to indivuduals in the constitution. Further, concurrent with the passage of these compromised bills, the one person, Kennedy, with a proven determination (see Oxford and Alabama) who could give the bills the teeth they needed, was dead. Johnson escalated in Vietnam, and at the same time compartmentalised the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bills which meant enforcing them (as changed as they were) harder.

Reuther raised the issue of CIA fundings many months previous to the 1967 revelations, ad he was largely ignored. The free speech movement and the Anti War movement were in some disarray following the National Students Association Ramparts revelations, and the Reuther/Bobby/King coalition soon decimated.

IOW there were concurrent events that had different significance that were given unbalanced media treatment. In a similar way the 'spectacle' of a wiretapping/criminal Nixon overshadowed the enedemic long-standing wide spread illegal Agencies citizens disruption and surveillance programs.

Edited by John Dolva
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