Jump to content
The Education Forum

CIAir


Recommended Posts

I wrote this over a decade ago but just found it in the files. The death of Coates Lear and the JFK assassination connection is at the end. - BK

CIAIR – USOA vs. CIAIR – Weak Link in the Covert Action Chain

When Dr. Ralph Cox left the military after serving as a Navy flyer during World War II he didn't return to his Pittsburgh dental practice but instead bought some government surplus airplanes and began the United States Overseas Airlines, based in Rio Grand, near Wildwood, New Jersey.

In 1947 there were hundreds of similar, small, independent airlines like Cox's USOA, mainly servicing remote areas that were considered unprofitable routes for the large scheduled airlines.

By 1962 USOA was one of the largest, most reliable, safe and financially stable supplemental air carrier in the country, operating six DC6s and 12 DC4s, most of which were clear of any debt.

A few years later the planes were grounded and the company bankrupt, mainly because their long-held and properly serviced Military Air Transport (MAT) government contracts were suddenly and mysteriously diverted to a few, newer, smaller and untested airlines, including Southern Air Transport (SAT).

Although Cox suspected political schennigans were somehow involved at the time, it is now well known that SAT was a wholly owned subsidiary of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and the other airlines who received the diverted contracts had secret intelligence connections.

"The CIA put us out of business," said Cox, who has been running a camp ground at the Jersey Shore, not far from the Cape May County International Airport where the USOA once operated.

When the CIA's connections to Southern Air Transport were first revealed in 1975 by Victor Marchetti and John Marks in their book The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence, both Cox and Richard Newman, of California Air Charter both separately sued the CIA and the Civil Newman failed to get monetary restitution and Cox's case was thrown out of court on a technicality, both men wanted to get back into the air and fly again.

At his home Cox sifts through reams of files he claims supports his case while he explains how, even before the CIA buried them, the CAB tried to suppress the small independent airlines to the benefit of the major carriers. This was done not only to the detriment of the industry, but also hurt the pockets of the general public and even endangered the nation's security, as well as eliminating their jobs and livelihoods.

"We were a good, solid airline, and not a fly-by-night operation," Cox asserts. "We owned all our own equipment and planes and had good, dependable employees." Newspapers and magazine clips of the period show that USOA developed one of the first flight simulators to train pilots, successfully serviced remote points that were unprofitable to the major carriers – like Alaska and Okinawa, pioneered group charters and was the frits airline to employ native stewardesses, breaking a once stringent segregation barrier.

USOA, along with other small, independent carriers, were branded "Non-Scheduled Airlines" by the Civil Aviation Board (CAB) and nicknamed "non-skeds." They were the little guys in the same business as TWA, United, Eastern and Delta. They're the ones who provided emergency airlift relief and support to Berlin, Israel, the Congo, Korea and the Defense Early Warning (DEW) outposts in the artic. The industry's collapse made the evacuation of South Vietnam a major fiasco.

Although the CAB has been disbanded and the industry "deregulated," the non-skeds are still out of action. They not only lost their business, but their wings, and they want to fly again.

The non-skeds' case against the CIA became a newsworthy issue in the 1980s because of the SAT involvement in the Iran-Contra affair. In fact the whole secret operation came unwound when the Sandinistas shot down a SAT Contra supply plane in Nicaragua. Baggage handler Eugene Hasenfus survived the crash and was captured. In his pocket was the name and phone number of Feliz Rodrigez, the Cuban Bay of Pigs Brigade veteran and personal friend of George W. H. Bush.

This was not the first time a CIA operation was blown by an airman who survived being shot down over enemy territory. In 1958 Allen Pope was shot down and captured while working on Gen. Ed Lansdale's "Indonesian Operation."

Pope was a Civil Air Transport (CAT) pilot who, once he was released from the Indonesia prison in 1962, went to work for SAT. Alex E. Carson, the attorney for SAT at the time, was also the lawyer for Double-Check Corporation and CARAMAR – the Caribbean Marine Aero Corporation, the CIA front companies that hired the Alabama Air National Guard pilots to fly during the Bay of Pigs, some of whom were killed during the invasion. Secret CIA operations in Indonesia, Cuba and Nicaragua were all blown by the weak link in the covert action chain – the air link.

One of the most significant players in the Iran-Contra deal was Al Schwimmer of the Israel Aircraft Industry, who first proposed the United States swap arms for American hostages in Iran in the first place.

Adolph "Al" Schwimmer, an American born Israeli citizen and close advisor to former Israel President and foreign minister Simon Perez, helped instigate the Iran-Contra affair by suggesting the American hostages in Iran could possibly be exchanged for military hardware. Israel then refused to permit Schwimmer to testify before Congress on the special prosecutor investigating the Iran-Contra scandal.

According to Cox, Schwimmer used to operate out of the Burbank, California airport. "He leased one of my planes to assist the early government of Israel," said Cox, "but eventually they ended up stealing the plane." Since they used the USOA plane to ferry diplomats, arms and other cargo to the fledging country of Israel, U.S. Air Force General Curtis LeMay threatened to shoot it down for violating U.S. neutrality laws.

"When the Israelis learned about LeMay's threat," relates Cox, "pointing to a Life magazine article and photo, "they appropriated the plane, painted El Air markings over the USOA insignia and used it to begin their national airline." Cox said he was later paid the insured value of the plane, but not for the time it was used by Schwimmer.

Stewart Steven, in his book The Spymasters of Israel, reports that, "….Al Schwimmer, the remarkable American Jew who, in 1947, became one of the founding fathers of the Israel Air Force by purchasing old aircraft in the United States and cannibalizing them to produce serviceable planes for Israel. Since then, Schwimmer had risen to become president and chief executive of Israel Aircraft Industries, which he started from nothing and which now employs 15,000 people."

Steven also details Schwimmer's role in the 1968 covert operation that led to Israel obtaining the blueprints for the French Mirage jet fighter aircraft, and refers to him as one of the world's most knowledgeable arms dealers.

According to the President's Tower Commission Report on the Iran-Contra affair, Schwimmer was initially responsible for suggesting the arms for hostages deal with the Iranians, and for leasing the cargo aircraft that was used to ferry U.S. missiles to Iran.

A private, commercial air cargo plane had to be leased because, as one insider put it, "jaws would drop if a plane with Israel or U.S. markings landed in Iran."

But when it came time to transfer the arms, Schwimmer's lease for the planes had expired, and retired General Secord was called to acquire new planes, and he resorted to the old CIA standby – Southern Air Transport – SAT.

SAT was founded in Miami, Florida in 1949 by F.C. "Doc" Moor and Stanley G. Williams. On October 1, 1960 the CIA paid $500,000 fo the little airline that had only $100,000 in assets, and according to Christopher Robbin's book Air America, "….immediately began to fly international MATs contracts to undisclosed destinations." While Air America ran the CIA's Far Eastern routes, Southern Air Transport took care of the Latin American routes. The CIA also owned Air Asia, Intermountain Aviation and several other air charter companies.

The whole Iran-Contra connection began to come unraveled when the SAT plane was shot down by Sandinistas in Nicaragua while delivering arms to the Contras, and Eugene Hasenfus survived. Although the CIA maintained that it no longer owned SAT, agency attorneys and corporate managers with intelligence connections maintained control over the airline. "I don't care what they say," said Cox, "I believe SAT is still controlled by the CIA."

"At first we had to fight the CAB," Cox relates, "but they were a political entity, and we could deal with them, but how do you fight the CIA? We had to fight the federal government every step of the way."

The CIA has acknowledged that it owned SAT from 1962 until 1973.

The CAB, by over-regulation, had forced the Non-Skeds to rely on Military Air Transport (MAT) contracts to survive, contracts that were safely and successfully fulfilled for many years.

But suddenly millions of dollars in MAT contracts were cut off and given to the small, relatively unknown Southern Air Transport.

"Although we had a spotless record, without one passenger ever getting so much as a scratch, they grounded our planes," explained Cox, "and the military was banned from using the types of planes we had. So all of a sudden, we had ten planes rotting on the runways."

The independent airlines that ferried U.S. troops and relief supplies around the country and the world for years, to Israel in 1948, Hungry in 1955, Belgian Congo in 1960 and Berlin in 1962 were suddenly grounded.

On September 24, 1964, $250 million in MAT contracts were diverted from some 30 independent airlines, including USOA, and given to SAT and five other CIA linked carriers. USOA filed for bankruptcy.

"We didn't know what happened until ten years later," said Cox bitterly. As a conservative, Republican, anti-Communist veteran, Dr. Ralph Cox didn't suspect secret government collusion at first, and really didn't learn the specifics until 1974, when Marchetti and Marks wrote about the CIA links to the airline industry in their book.

"There was dirty works at the crossroads all the way through," said Cox, "but we didn't know it. We naively thought that we were dealing with the federal government, like the Post Office, a neutral, unbiased entity. Well, we'll never believe that again."

The CIA didn't even underbid the other airlines. "In some cases, they even charged more," Cox said.

According to a congressional aide who looked into the matter for then Congressman William Hughes, "This whole story is kind of intriguing. It's the kind of thing you expect to find in a cloak and dagger mystery novel. But actually it had quite an impact on Cape May County's economy. If they had been able to stay in business and grow, they would be quite significant players in the airline industry today."

By the mid-1950s the approximately 500 supplemental airlines had been widdled down to 150 Non-Skeds, and in 1962, the 30 airlines that had shared the $250 million in MATS contracts were suddenly shut out and the contracts given to six small, relatively new air carriers. Two of them, Air American and Southern Air Transport, were wholly owned subsidiaries of the CIA.

Although he didn't know the CIA was involved, Cox did notice that Southern Air Transport and the five other airlines that received the MAT contracts were all represented by Coates Lear or connected to Lear's National Air Carriers Association (NACA).

Since Cox's USOA had serviced a U.S. Navy contract that was picked up by the Air Force, Cox knew that Lear worked out of the D.C. law office of Zuckert, Scoutt & Rasenberger.

Mr. Eugene Zuckert, a senior partner in the firm, was the Secretary of the Air Force, and Coates Lear was his law partner. Both Lear and Zuckert served as presidents of the NACA. Gerald Scoutt later replaced Ed Daley as Chairman of the Board of World Airways.

Lear was attorney of record for World Airways, Capitol Airlines, ARCO and a major stockholder of Overseas National Airlines, all companies that received the MATS contracts. (The other airline that received MATS contracts was Los Angeles Air Services, which became Trans-International, which was under Ted Burwell, another CIA connected officer).

Because of its destructive, below cost military contracts, ONA reported a minus net worth of nearly $4 million in 1960, and used a number of DC7s that American Airlines had made available to General Leasing Corporation, a subsidiary of the Convair Division of General Dynamics.

Continental Airlines hired Pierre Salinger as a corporate officer. Salinger possibly knew of the CIA connections to the airlines because of his position as President Kennedy's assistant.

Continental also obtained government contracts, including lucrative troop transport contracts delivering soldiers to Vietnam. Continental opened a Nevada based subsidiary, Continental Air Services, and made Robert Rousselot president. Rousselot, an ex-Marine pilot, was an old CIA China hand who had worked for CAT for 17 years.

Recognizing Lear's influence in the awarding of the MATS contracts, Cox went to Lear and asked him to help arrange for the USOA to continue receiving the MATS contracts in order to stay in business. Lear told Cox, "the boys won't let you in," as if it was some elite private club for members only. Cox called the CIA connected airlines "MATS Mistresses."

In 1962 Cox testified before a Congressional committee that the new policies, "…practically eliminated independent supplemental air carriers, even though Congress has always held them to be a vital part of our economy and our national security."

The too-few of Ed Daley's World Airways planes were sent to evacuate Saigon and Da Nang, which certainly indicted how the failure of the supplemental airline industry was a direct threat to our national security. The two World Airways planes that landed in Da Nang to evacuate civilians were swamped by thousands of refugees, some of whom hung on to the wheels of the jets as they took off. South Vietnamese soldiers beat off women and children to make the flight.

Eventually Congress decided to investigate these matters, but when Robert Roussoulet was scheduled to testify before a Congressional committee in 1976, he mysteriously failed to appear, and never did testify.

One CIA director eventually asked the simple question, "How many planes does the CIA own?" But the answer came back that they really didn't know. In fact, one of the CIA airlines had more employees (30,000) than the CIA itself.

On February 5, 1963 the CIA airlines were formally organized under the umbrella of EXCOMAIR – the Executive Committee for Air Proprietary Operations. EXCOMAIR was, "to provide general policy guidance for the management of air propriety projects and review recommendations for approval of air proprietary project actions." Lawrence Houston was appointed chairman of the committee.

In the fall of 1963 Coats Lear was killed by a shotgun blast to the head. Although some suggested it was suicide, others believe he was murdered.

Lear was a law partner in Eugene Zucker's firm, and Zuckert, as Secretary of the Air Force, was involved in the awarding of contracts.

Ed Driscol, the man who handled the administration of many of the MATS contracts at the Pentagon, became Executive Director of the Civil Aeronautics Board after the death of Lear. Later, Driscol became VP at World Airways, one of the companies he funneled MATS contracts to from the Pentagon and CAB.

Driscol was the Director of Transportation under Joseph Imire, the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force and John H. Rubel, the Asst. Secretary of Defense. With CAB chairman Alan S. Boyd, they effectively ended the competitive bidding for MATS contracts and arbitrarily awarded them to their favorite airlines connected to the CIA and/or Lear & Zuckert.

Ruble, Imire and Driscol all resigned shortly before the death of Lear. While Driscol went on to the CAB and World Airways, Ruble and Imire became Vice President of Litton Industries, a major defense contractor.

Another explanation for Lear's death is provided by Amos Heacock, another independent airline owner put out of business by the CIA, who believes that is a connection between Lear's demise and the assassination of President Kennedy shortly thereafter.

Heacock believes Lear's law partner, Eugene Zuckert, as Secretary of the Air Force, had something to do with the scheduling of the President's visit to Texas. He may have been responsible for the upkeep of Air Force One and Two, the planes provided for Executive office use by the President, Vice President and the cabinet.

According to this theory, Zuckert, as Secretary of the Air Force, obtained foreknowledge of the assassination, information that was also picked up by Lear. This either drove Lear crazy enough to kill himself, or made him unstable and a threat tothose planning to kill the President, so Lear also had to die.

Zuckert, a graduate of Yale University, served as the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force from 1947-1952 and was a member of the Atomic Energy Commission from 1952-1954. He left the Nuclear Science and Engineering Corporation of Pittsburgh (no longer listed in the phone book) where he worked from 1960-61, to become Secretary of the Air Force. The NE&E Corp. is described in "Elites in American History" as "a relatively small Pittsburgh based concern which was backed by various financial interests, chief of which was probably New York's Lehman Brothers, a concern with great politico-economic influence."

One of the most important decisions Zuckert made as Air Force Secretary concerned the F-111 jet fighter contract. Although every independent study recommended that the contract be awarded to Boeing, which designed both a less expensive and better performing aircraft, the contract went to General Dynamics.

This decision was made by four men – Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Deputy Secretary of Defense Roswell Gilpatrick, Secretary of the Navy Fred Korth and Air Force Secretary Eugene Zuckert.

[/size]

Gilpatrick was a former Wall Street law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore, and had previously represented General Dynamics, while Korth was president of Continental National Bank of Ft. Worth, Texas. General Dynamic's Ft. Worth Plant eventually received the bulk of the contract.

[William Kelly's research is supported in part by a grant from the Fund For Constitutional Government Investigative Journalism Project.]

Edited by William Kelly
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adolph “Al” Schwimmer, an American born Israeli citizen and close advisor to former Israel President and foreign minister Simon Perez, helped instigate the Iran-Contra affair by suggesting the American hostages in Iran could possibly be exchanged for military hardware. Israel then refused to permit Schwimmer to testify before Congress on the special prosecutor investigating the Iran-Contra scandal.

Great stuff, Bill.

Without wishing to divert the thread, I think it's worth noting that L Robert Castorr ran a front company with two others heavily involved in this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adolph "Al" Schwimmer, an American born Israeli citizen and close advisor to former Israel President and foreign minister Simon Perez, helped instigate the Iran-Contra affair by suggesting the American hostages in Iran could possibly be exchanged for military hardware. Israel then refused to permit Schwimmer to testify before Congress on the special prosecutor investigating the Iran-Contra scandal.

Great stuff, Bill.

Without wishing to divert the thread, I think it's worth noting that L Robert Castorr ran a front company with two others heavily involved in this.

Hi Greg,

Point taken re: LRC & Iran-Contra. He's certainly a pivotal character, and it seems there were more than a few involved in multible covert ops - from Bay of Pigs, Dallas, Vietnam, Watergate, Iran-Contra, etc.

Wondering if LRCastorr served in same Army Reserve units as Col. Jose Rivera, since they both ended up at Bathesda.

As for CIAir, I think if this line is followed - that the air-transport is the weak link in the covert action chain - then it should be applied to JFK - Love Field/Redbird/New Orleans/Mexico/Miami/Cuba - all invoving planes which leave a paper trail.

Just thinking about the JM/WAVE air force, like their fleet, provide avenues for running down paper trails that lead to more documentary records and new witnesses.

Have some more articles for your web site.

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adolph "Al" Schwimmer, an American born Israeli citizen and close advisor to former Israel President and foreign minister Simon Perez, helped instigate the Iran-Contra affair by suggesting the American hostages in Iran could possibly be exchanged for military hardware. Israel then refused to permit Schwimmer to testify before Congress on the special prosecutor investigating the Iran-Contra scandal.

Great stuff, Bill.

Without wishing to divert the thread, I think it's worth noting that L Robert Castorr ran a front company with two others heavily involved in this.

Hi Greg,

Point taken re: LRC & Iran-Contra. He's certainly a pivotal character, and it seems there were more than a few involved in multible covert ops - from Bay of Pigs, Dallas, Vietnam, Watergate, Iran-Contra, etc.

Bill, well picked up because that is the main issue.

Wondering if LRCastorr served in same Army Reserve units as Col. Jose Rivera, since they both ended up at Bathesda.

Hmmm.. hadn't thought of that.

As for CIAir, I think if this line is followed - that the air-transport is the weak link in the covert action chain - then it should be applied to JFK - Love Field/Redbird/New Orleans/Mexico/Miami/Cuba - all involving planes which leave a paper trail.

I wonder, was there any way of at least limiting such a paper trail..? use of private airstrips.. (this certainly happened in Latin America)? small airstrips that may be run by CIA assets...? Assets within aviation authorities..? I really don't know, just musing on the possibilities...

Just thinking about the JM/WAVE air force, like their fleet, provide avenues for running down paper trails that lead to more documentary records and new witnesses.

Yes, even if I'm right above, I'm sure at least partial trails must exist.

Have some more articles for your web site.

Great! Look forward to seeing them.

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

It's the first time I've seen anyone mention anything about the connection between the CIA infiltration of the airline industry, the murder of Coates Lear, and JFK's assassination. It's also the first time I've seen mention of Amos Heacock. I would really like to get in touch with Mr. Kelly, but do not have his personal email address.

At the suggestion of Gail Beagle, I interviewed Mr. Heacock in Washington, D.C. in 1978. He was a fascinating man with fascinating theories, to say the least. Not only had his small airline gone out of business due to CIA takeover of the industry for the military-industrial-complex, he told me he "enjoyed counterintelligence" in regard to JFK's assassination, Watergate, Dorothy Hunt's murder, the kidnapping of Howard Hughes and other interesting "things."

Mr. Heacock believed that Coates Lear was indeed, murdered as a security risk for the secret of the assassination. According to Heacock, Lear had followed CIA instructions to arrange the trip to Texas through his boss and law partner, Secretary Zuckert. He also believed that the same assassin murdered William Gingery the same way (mentioned in Fletcher Prouty's book), as well as murdering Bradford Bishop and his family (a mystery in itself!),Anatoli Michailovich Gransovsky (a former KGB assassin) and Anne Comanduras (attached to the CIA's assassination facility and half sister to Thomas Karassimes(chief of CIA ops department that included assassination missions). Most interestingly, he believed that the same assassin was involved in JFK's murder - not as a shooter, but as an accomplice who escaped with one of the weapons.

After reading your recent post about the murder (in my opinion) of Dorothy Hunt, I re-read my notes from the interview with Mr. Heacock and remembered that he told me he knew that a Mr. Edward Carlson (former exec. head of United's parent company)had personally met with President Nixon to discuss the physical evidence of sabotage of Dorothy Hunt's plane. He also believed that the same saboteur sabotaged the TWA plane at Dulles airport in Dec. 1974, as well as the Turkish Airlines DC-10 that crashed after takeoff from Paris on March 9, 1974. (In his recent book, I believe that Hunt's lie about the reason his wife was carrying so much cash on the day of her death is predictably nauseating.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He also believed that the same assassin murdered William Gingery the same way (mentioned in Fletcher Prouty's book), as well as murdering Bradford Bishop and his family (a mystery in itself!) (Sydney Wilkinson)

Sydney,

That was a very interesting post. I might be a bit behind the news here, but I thought Bradford Bishop was listed as missing?

Also, do you have anything on Dick O'Melia and any associations he may have had with William Gingery?

Cheers,

James

Edited by James Richards
Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to this theory, Zuckert, as Secretary of the Air Force, obtained foreknowledge of the assassination, information that was also picked up by Lear. This either drove Lear crazy enough to kill himself, or made him unstable and a threat tothose planning to kill the President, so Lear also had to die.

Zuckert, a graduate of Yale University, served as the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force from 1947-1952 and was a member of the Atomic Energy Commission from 1952-1954. He left the Nuclear Science and Engineering Corporation of Pittsburgh (no longer listed in the phone book) where he worked from 1960-61, to become Secretary of the Air Force. The NE&E Corp. is described in "Elites in American History" as "a relatively small Pittsburgh based concern which was backed by various financial interests, chief of which was probably New York's Lehman Brothers, a concern with great politico-economic influence."

One of the most important decisions Zuckert made as Air Force Secretary concerned the F-111 jet fighter contract. Although every independent study recommended that the contract be awarded to Boeing, which designed both a less expensive and better performing aircraft, the contract went to General Dynamics.

This decision was made by four men – Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Deputy Secretary of Defense Roswell Gilpatrick, Secretary of the Navy Fred Korth and Air Force Secretary Eugene Zuckert.

[/size]

Gilpatrick was a former Wall Street law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore, and had previously represented General Dynamics, while Korth was president of Continental National Bank of Ft. Worth, Texas. General Dynamic's Ft. Worth Plant eventually received the bulk of the contract.

It is often forgotten that the investigation into the TFX/F-111 was virtually brought to an end by the assassination of JFK. I suspect when JFK told Evelyn Lincoln he intended to clean up government by not having LBJ on the ticket he was thinking about the TFX contract. Remember, he had forced Fred Korth to resign at the end of October 1963. I think it is worth a close look at these events.

In the last few months of Eisenhower’s administration the Air Force began to argue that it needed a successor to its F-105 tactical fighter. This became known as the TFX/ F-111 project. In January, 1961, Robert McNamara, changed the TFX from an Air Force program to a joint Air Force-Navy under-taking. On 1st October, the two services sent the aircraft industry the request for proposals on the TFX and the accompanying work statement, with instructions to submit the bids by 1st December, 1961. Three of the bids were submitted by individual companies: the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, the North American Aviation Corporation and the Boeing Company. The other three bids represented team efforts: Republic Aviation & Chance Vought; General Dynamics Corporation & Grumman Aircraft; and McDonnell Aircraft & Douglas Aircraft. (1)

It soon became clear that Boeing was expected to get the contract. Its main competitor was the General Dynamics/Grumman bid. General Dynamics had been America’s leading military contractors during the early stages of the Cold War. For example, in 1958 it obtained $2,239,000,000 worth of government business. This was a higher figure than those obtained by its competitors, such as Lockheed, Boeing, McDonnell and North American. (2) More than 80 percent of the firm’s business came from the government. (3) However, the company lost $27 million in 1960 and $143 million in 1961. According to an article by Richard Austin Smith in Fortune Magazine, General Dynamics was close to bankruptcy. Smith claimed that “unless it gets the contract for the joint Navy-Air Force fighter (TFX)… the company was down the road to receivership”. (4)

General Dynamics had several factors in its favour. The president of the company was Frank Pace, the Secretary of the Army (April, 1950-January, 1953). The Deputy Secretary of Defence in 1962 was Roswell Gilpatric, who before he took up the post, was chief counsel for General Dynamics. The Secretary of the Navy was John Connally, a politician from Texas, the state where General Dynamics had its main plant. When he left the job in 1962 he was replaced by another Texan, Fred Korth. According to author Seth Kantor, Korth, the former president of the Continental National Bank of Fort Worth, Texas, only got the job as Secretary of the Navy after strong lobbying from Johnson. (5) A few weeks after taking the post, Korth overruled top Navy officers who had proposed that the X-22 contract be given to Douglas Aircraft Corporation. Instead he insisted the contract be granted to the more expensive bid of the Bell Aerosystem Development Company. This was a subsidiary of Bell Aerospace Corporation of Forth Worth, Texas. (6) For many years Korth had been a director of Bell (7). The chairman of the company, Lawrence Bell, was a fellow member of the Suite 8F Group.

Korth also became very involved in discussions about the TFX contract. Korth, was the former president of the Continental Bank, which had loaned General Dynamics considerable sums of money during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Korth later told the McClellan committee that investigated the granting of the TFX contract to General Dynamics “that because of his peculiar position he had deliberately refrained from taking a directing hand in this decision (within the Navy) until the last possible moment.” (8).

As I. F. Stone pointed out, it was “the last possible moment” which counted. “Three times the Pentagon’s Source Selection Board found that Boeing’s bid was better and cheaper than that of General Dynamics and three times the bids were sent back for fresh submissions by the two bidders and fresh reviews. On the fourth round, the military still held that Boeing was better but found at last that the General Dynamics bid was also acceptable.” (9)

Stone goes on to argue: “The only document the McClellan committee investigators were able to find in the Pentagon in favour of that award, according to their testimony, was a five-page memorandum signed by McNamara, Korth, and Eugene Zuckert, then Secretary of the Air Force.”

Zuckert was a close friend of Tommy Corcoran who helped to get him a post with the legal staff of the fledgling Securities and Exchange Commission in 1937. He was also closely associated with John McCone. Zuckert worked with McCone as a member of the Atomic Energy Commission in the early 1950s.

McNamara justified his support for General Dynamics because “Boeing had from the very beginning consistently chosen more technically risky tradeoffs in an effort to achieve operational features which exceeded the required performance characteristics.” (10)

The TFX program involved the building of 1,700 planes for the Navy and the Air Force. The contract was estimated to be worth over $6.5 billion, making it the largest contract for military planes in the nation’s history. (11)

On 24th October, 1962, Seth Kantor reported in the Fort Worth Press that: “General Dynamics of Fort Worth will get the multibillion-dollar defence contract to build the supersonic TFX Air Force and Navy fighter plane, the Fort Worth Press learned today from top Government sources.” (12)

This was confirmed the following month when the Pentagon announced that the TFX contract would be awarded to General Dynamics. Henry M. Jackson was a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, the Senate Government Operations Committee and the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. He learned that: “Boeing’s bid was substantially lower than its competitor’s. Reports indicated Boeing’s bid was $100 million lower on an initial development contract and that the cost difference might run as high as $400 million on the total $6.5 billion procurement.” (13)

On 12th December, Lyndon Johnson visited Forth Worth to join in the festivities at the General Dynamics plant. Congressman James Wright, the Texas Democrat representing the Fort Worth district introduced Johnson as the “greatest Texan of them all”. He pointed out that Johnson had played an important role in obtaining the TFX contract. Wright added “you have to have friends and they have to stick with you through thick and thin even if you do have merit on your side.” (14)

During the McClellan's Permanent Investigations Committee hearings into the contract, Senator Sam Ervin asked Robert McNamara “whether or not there was any connection whatever between your selection of General Dynamics, and the fact that the Vice President of the United States happens to be a resident of the state in which that company has one of its principal, if not its principal office.” At this point McNamara was close to tears and commented that: “Last night when I got home at midnight, after preparing for today’s hearing, my wife told me that my own 12-year-old son had asked how long it would take for his father to prove his honesty.” (15)

McNamara rejected the idea that Johnson was involved in the decision but evidence was to emerge that he did play an important role in the awarding of the TFX project to General Dynamics. For example, William Proxmire found some interesting information on the TFX project while investigating the role played by Richard Russell in the granting of the C-5A contract to Lockheed. The C-5A was built in Marietta, Georgia, the state that Russell represented. The Air Force Contract Selection Board originally selected Boeing that was located in the states of Washington and Kansas. However, Proxmire claimed that Russell was able to persuade the board to change its mind and give the C-5A contract to Lockhead.

Proxmire quotes Howard Atherton, the mayor of Marietta, as saying that “Russell was key to landing the contract”. Atherton added that Russell believed that Robert McNamara was going ahead with the C-5A in order to “give the plane to Boeing because Boeing got left out on the TFX fighter.” According to Atherton, Russell got the contract after talking to Lyndon Johnson. Atherton added, “without Russell, we wouldn’t have gotten the contract”. (16)

On 26th June, 1963, Clark R. Mollenhoff managed to interview Robert McNamara about his role in awarding the TFX contract to General Dynamics. McNamara claimed that Johnson had applied no political pressure on him concerning the contract. He admitted that he knew all about Fred Korth’s business relationship with General Dynamics and Bell Aerospace. He also revealed he was aware of Roswell Gilpatric’s role “as a lawyer for General Dynamics just prior to coming into government, the role of Gilpatric’s law firm in continuing to represent General Dynamics, and the amount of money Gilpatric had received from the law firm since becoming Deputy Defence Secretary”. However, he was convinced that this did not influence the decision made by Korth and Gilpatric. (17)

Several journalists speculated that Johnson and his friends in Texas had played a key role in obtaining the TFX contract for General Dynamics. (18) When "reporters discovered that the Continental National Bank of Fort Worth, was the principal money source for the General Dynamics plant" in October, 1963, Fred Korth was forced to resign as Secretary of the Navy. (19)

Hanson W. Baldwin believed that the main villain was Robert McNamara. In an article in the Saturday Evening Post, Baldwin wrote: “Mr. McNamara has pressured the Joint Chiefs of Staff to sign written statements testifying to Congress that the Administration’s defence budget is adequate. He has censored, deleted and altered statements to Congress by the chiefs of the services and their secretaries. He has downgraded, ignored, bypassed or overruled the advice of the Joint Chiefs of Staff… It places more and more power over the military-industrial complex in the hands of a few men in the executive branch of the government. The dollar volumes of military contracts amount to more than $20 billion annually, with billions more in backlog orders outstanding. The individual services no longer have the final power to contract… The awarding or cancellation of contracts… is now ultimately controlled by a very few men in the top echelons of the Defence Department.” (20)

Johnson’s role in these events was confirmed when Don B. Reynolds testified in a secret session of the Senate Rules Committee. As Victor Lasky pointed out, Reynolds “spoke of the time Bobby Baker opened a satchel full of paper money which he said was a $100,000 payoff for Johnson for pushing through a $7billion TFX plane contract.” (21)

In his book, The Military-Industrial Complex, Sidney Lens argues: “It is no accident that Washington has been almost universally on the side of conservative forces in the developing areas – Syngman Rhee in Korea, Chiang Kai-shek in China, the Shah in Iran, the militarists throughout Latin America, the king in Jordan, the king in Saudia Arabia, the military regimes in Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam. These conservative elements, to secure their own “vested interests,” have been willing to accept American military and economic support in return for concessions to American “vested interests”. Nor is it an accident that by and large the same legislators – Stennis, Russell, Rivers, Mundt, Goldwater, Tower, McClellan, to name a few – who are the fiercest advocates of military spending and military ventures, are also the fiercest opponents of social programs such as Medicare, higher minimum wages, antipoverty, social security, and favourable trade union legislation.” (22)

Notes

1. Robert J. Art, The TFX Decision: McNamara and the Military, 1968 (pages 62-63)

2. William Proxmire, speech in the Senate, 24th March, 1969

3. I. F. Stone, The New York Review of Books, 1st January, 1969

4. Richard Austin Smith, Fortune Magazine, February, 1962

5. Seth Kantor, Who Was Jack Ruby?, 1978 (page 19)

6. Clark R. Mollenhoff, Despoilers of Democracy, 1965 (pages 133-137)

7. Award of the X-22 (VTOL) Research and Development Contract, 1964 (page 9)

8. Robert J. Art, The TFX Decision, 1968 (page 5)

9. I. F. Stone, The New York Review of Books, 1st January, 1969

10. Quoted by Frederic M. Scherer, The Weapons Acquisition Process: Economic Incentives, 1964 (page 37)

11. TFX Contract Investigations Hearing Report, March 1963 (pages 3-4)

12. Seth Kantor, Fort Worth Press (24th October, 1962)

13. Clark R. Mollenhoff, Pentagon, 1967 (pages 299-300)

14. Fort Worth Telegram (13th December, 1962)

15. Clark R. Mollenhoff, Despoilers of Democracy, 1965 (page 171)

16. William Proxmire, Report from Wasteland: America’s Military-Industrial Complex, 1970 (pages 100-102)

17. Clark R. Mollenhoff, Despoilers of Democracy, 1965 (pages 188-193)

18. See “Missiles and Rockets” (11th February, 1963) and Aviation Week & Space Technology (25th February, 1963)

19. Peter Dale Scott, Deep Politics and the Death of JFK, 1993 (page 220)

20. Hanson W. Baldwin, Saturday Evening Post (9th March, 1963)

21. Victor Lasky, It Didn’t Start With Watergate, 1977 (page 144)

22. Stanley Lens, The Military-Industrial Complex, 1970 (page 146)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm happy to try to answer your questions, but please be patient with this neophyte...

Re: Bradford Bishop...you haven't missed a thing, as far as I'm aware. The extent of my knowledge about Bradford Bishop is what I've read throughout the years - that he's been on the run since he murdered his wife and children about 30 years ago, and the authorities can't find him. Consequently, I have no idea how truthful Mr. Heacock's claims are.

Re: Richard O'Melia...I'm afraid I know nothing about Mr. O'Melia, other than what Mr. Heacock wrote in a statement and motion for mistrial before a Civil Aeronautics Board preceeding back in '78. It doesn't answer your question, but I've attached what I could find.

I haven't been able to check the veracity of most of Mr. Heacock's claims....which is why I responded to Mr. Kelly's post in the first place. I don't want to detract from the important work being done by all of you on Mr. Simkin's forum, but I would be most appreciative if anyone can shed any light on the limited information Mr. Heacock gave me.

post-735-1183529030_thumb.jpg

Edited by Sydney Wilkinson
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sydney,

I don't want to derail Bill's thread, but the Bishop thing is one of the more curious murders of the time.

He was a Yale graduate and worked with the State Department as an assistant chief of the special trade activities office.

At the time, the cop in charge claimed that Bishop was their only suspect but refused to comment on why they thought that. Bishop was said to have bludgeoned his wife and three sons to death. He was also charged with the demise of his mother but the cause of her death was not revealed.

Brad Bishop below who looks remarkably like John Liggett.

James

Edited by James Richards
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
It's the first time I've seen anyone mention anything about the connection between the CIA infiltration of the airline industry, the murder of Coates Lear, and JFK's assassination. It's also the first time I've seen mention of Amos Heacock. I would really like to get in touch with Mr. Kelly, but do not have his personal email address.

At the suggestion of Gail Beagle, I interviewed Mr. Heacock in Washington, D.C. in 1978. He was a fascinating man with fascinating theories, to say the least. Not only had his small airline gone out of business due to CIA takeover of the industry for the military-industrial-complex, he told me he "enjoyed counterintelligence" in regard to JFK's assassination, Watergate, Dorothy Hunt's murder, the kidnapping of Howard Hughes and other interesting "things."

Mr. Heacock believed that Coates Lear was indeed, murdered as a security risk for the secret of the assassination. According to Heacock, Lear had followed CIA instructions to arrange the trip to Texas through his boss and law partner, Secretary Zuckert. He also believed that the same assassin murdered William Gingery the same way (mentioned in Fletcher Prouty's book), as well as murdering Bradford Bishop and his family (a mystery in itself!),Anatoli Michailovich Gransovsky (a former KGB assassin) and Anne Comanduras (attached to the CIA's assassination facility and half sister to Thomas Karassimes(chief of CIA ops department that included assassination missions). Most interestingly, he believed that the same assassin was involved in JFK's murder - not as a shooter, but as an accomplice who escaped with one of the weapons.

After reading your recent post about the murder (in my opinion) of Dorothy Hunt, I re-read my notes from the interview with Mr. Heacock and remembered that he told me he knew that a Mr. Edward Carlson (former exec. head of United's parent company)had personally met with President Nixon to discuss the physical evidence of sabotage of Dorothy Hunt's plane. He also believed that the same saboteur sabotaged the TWA plane at Dulles airport in Dec. 1974, as well as the Turkish Airlines DC-10 that crashed after takeoff from Paris on March 9, 1974. (In his recent book, I believe that Hunt's lie about the reason his wife was carrying so much cash on the day of her death is predictably nauseating.)

The above is potentially a MOST interesting and important post with much new infomation and connections! Could you kindly expand on the above and your interview with Mr. Heacock et al! Thank you kindly. You have no biography listed on the Forum and I'd be interested in any you feel you can share here or privately by PM. Thanks again and hope you stick around.....I see a few potential areas above that others could well help you and all of us bring to some fruitfull research progress! These are important areas and connect to even more important ones, potentially. Thanks!

Peter, and others interested in this document.

Sydney has scanned and emailed me a couple more pages, but it will be impossible to email all 50 some pages of Heacock's document, so I'm going to arrange for him to send it to Jim Lesar at AARC or Rex Bradford at MFA and see if it can be totally scanned and posted for all to read.

Sydney, who was an intern in DC during the HSCA, also has some interviews and other records that might be of interest.

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

http://www.afio.com/05_events.htm

WHILE ACKNOWLEDGING AND COMMEMORATING AIR AMERICA'S RESCUE EFFORTS DURING THE VIETNAM WAR, THEY FAIL TO RECOGNIZE WHAT RALPH COX AND HEACOCK ARE SAYING - THAT BY PUTTING THE AMERICAN INDEPENDENT AIRLINES OUT OF BUSINESS, THE CIA AIRLINE(S) WERE ILL PREPARED TO AFFECT A PROPER RESCUE OF AMERICAN ALLIES AND REFUGEES DURING THE FALL OF SAIGON.

UNLIKE BERLIN, WHERE THE INDEPENDENT AIRLINES MADE HEROIC FLIGHTS OF MERCY, THERE WAS NO CAPABILITY OF EVACUATING THOSE WHO NEEDED LET ALONE WANTED TO GET OUT AND WERE LEFT TO THE MERCY OF THE COMMIES.

THE AIR AMERICA YAHOOS, AS DEPECTED IN THE MOVIE, FAILED WHEN THEY WERE MOST NEEDED, BUT YOU WON'T HEAR IT FROM THEM, AS ALL THEY WANT IS THEIR MEDALS AND THEIR COWBOY BRAGGADERO - BK

FIO Members are invited to the CIA - UTD Conference - Saturday, 18 April 2009

Air America: Upholding the Airmen’s Bond

A symposium acknowledging and commemorating

Air America’s rescue efforts during the Vietnam War

April 18, 2009

1pm – 5:30 pm

The University of Texas at Dallas Conference Center Auditorium

Reception and viewing of

CIA and UT Dallas exhibits to follow

This event is free and unclassified. Event check-in is from 12:30 to 1:00 p.m.

Seating is limited so RSVPs are strongly encouraged. If you do RSVP, a seat will be held for you until 12:50.

To RSVP, go to http://www.utdallas.edu/airamerica/

Air America: Upholding the Airmen’s Bond

Quietly and courageously throughout the long and difficult Vietnam War, Air America, a secretly-owned air proprietary of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), remained the indispensable instrument of CIA’s clandestine mission. This legacy is captured in a recent CIA Director’s statement that the Agency’s mission is to “accomplish what others cannot accomplish and go where others cannot go.” While some of Air America’s work may never be publicly acknowledged, much of the company’s critical role in wartime rescue missions can now be revealed. This joint symposium with the CIA and The University of Texas at Dallas provides a forum for the release of thousands of pages of heretofore unavailable documents on Air America’s relationship with the Central Intelligence Agency. Moreover, the symposium brings together many Air America veterans, a number of men rescued by Air America, and the CIA “customers” who often placed their lives and missions in the hands of this once-secret air proprietary.

Air America crews were not required to monitor military emergency radio calls, fly to the location of military personnel in distress, or place their lives at risk of enemy ground-fire and possible capture. They received no extra compensation for rescue work and sometimes lost wages for their efforts. However, in their flying community it was enough to know that a downed aviator was in trouble and that airmen should always come to the aid of other airmen. It was simply the Airmen’s Bond.

To help commemorate Air America’s rescue efforts during the Vietnam War, the symposium will include the following speakers and panel members:

Mr. Jim Glerum Senior Operations Officer, CIA, Retired

Dr. Timothy Castle Noted historian and author, CIA

Panel Discussion: Laos Rescues – Lima Site 85 and other Military Rescues

John Daniel USAF Retired, Site 85 survivor, rescued by Air America

Loy “Rusty” Irons Air America flight mechanic on Site 85 rescue helicopter

John “Woody” Spence Paramilitary Officer, CIA Retired, Site 85 survivor, rescued by Air America

Admiral Donald Boecker USN Retired, A6 pilot, shot-down July 1965, rescued by Air America

Sam Jordan Air America Pilot, Participated in rescue of Admiral Boecker

Panel Discussion: The Final Days: 1975 – Rescue Efforts during the fall of South Vietnam

Dr. Joe Guilmartin Professor, Ohio State University. Former USAF “Jolly Green” combat rescue pilot

Ed Adams Air America Pilot. Conducted rescue operations in Laos and South Vietnam.

Marius Burke Air America Pilot. Conducted rescue operations in Laos and South Vietnam.

Additional speakers planned include senior CIA officials speaking on the importance of openness and the release of declassified documents, senior military officers, pilots, and aviation historians.

Reception: The reception will include an opportunity to personally meet and talk to many Air America pilots and employees, those who worked with Air America, and those rescued by Air America, as well as the opportunity to view Air America exhibits from the CIA and UT Dallas. This reception is being sponsored by the Association of Former Intelligence Officers.

Booklet and DVD: Each attendee will receive a commemorative booklet highlighting the symposium. The booklet will include articles on Air America, photos, and a selection of recently declassified documents that include first-hand accounts of rescues and evacuations, letters of thanks from President Nixon and others, The Airmen’s Bond, and the article Why We Care by L. Michael Kandt, chaplain and general secretary of the Air America Association, Inc.

Each attendee will also receive a DVD containing electronic copies of the entire collection of newly declassified and heretofore unavailable documents. The DVD will also contain video interviews of Air America pilots, rare footage of Lima Site 85, and photos from the CIA and McDermott Library collections.

Declassified Research Documents: In conjunction with the symposium, The UT Dallas McDermott Library will receive copies of approximately 10,000 of the recently declassified CIA documents on Air America, which will be added to the University’s History of Aviation Collection. These government papers augment existing Air America archives given to the University by the Air America Alumni Association. Now with the addition of the CIA materials, this collection is destined to become one of the finest sources in the nation to study this fascinating period of Cold War history.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...
Guest Tom Scully
....This decision was made by four men – Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Deputy Secretary of Defense Roswell Gilpatrick, Secretary of the Navy Fred Korth and Air Force Secretary Eugene Zuckert.

[/size]

Gilpatrick was a former Wall Street law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore, and had previously represented General Dynamics, while Korth was president of Continental National Bank of Ft. Worth, Texas. General Dynamic's Ft. Worth Plant eventually received the bulk of the contract.

It is often forgotten that the investigation into the TFX/F-111 was virtually brought to an end by the assassination of JFK. I suspect when JFK told Evelyn Lincoln he intended to clean up government by not having LBJ on the ticket he was thinking about the TFX contract. Remember, he had forced Fred Korth to resign at the end of October 1963. I think it is worth a close look at these events. ....

....In passing, anybody suspect it was possible that Fred Korth was fired as Navy Secretary because "the players" feared Korth was interfering with General Dynamic's retention of the TFX contract, and not because he was trying to help GD keep it?...

Paul Nitze was Fred Korth's replacement....here he is...accused of sticking his neck out, in too obvious a manner, to funnel $200 million to General Dynamics on a very week pretext...they might sue if we don't cave in completely to their demands. A study of the efforts of Gordon W. Rule reveal him as an unrecognized champion of the people.

There is more documentation of the relationship between the Crowns and the Nitze's contained in my excerpted post above. Nitze, long associated with McCloy who "served" on the WC, and Dean Acheson, who was the second reference named by Earl Warren in support of Albert Jenner as WC senior asst. counsel (the only other reference named was Tom Clark), and the rest of Evan Thomas's "Six Wise Men", along with Bohlen, Harriman, Kennan, and Lovett.

http://books.google.com/books?um=1&q=%...nG=Search+Books

Aggression: our Asian disaster‎ - Page 114

William L. Standard - History - 1971 - 228 pages

...General Dynamics had the sad experience of having thirteen

of its Fl IB planes crash in their

their twenty-six months of operation — yet in spite of this,

General Dynamics is presently in line for the much-contested ABM (Anti- Ballistic Missile)

and AMSA (Advance Manned Strategic Aircraft) contracts.

General Dynamics' success in securing such prime contracts for the construction

of the the ABM and AMSA must be due in part to

Defense Secretary David Packard's former directorship of General Dynamics

until his Pentagon appointment.

of General Dynamics until his Pentagon appointment. Gordon W. Rule, a

civilian procurement officer who was responsible for the Fl IB aircraft, said,

n testimony before the House Committee on Military Operations, that

General Dynamics was in default on its contract because the planes were too

heavy to meet the height or range requirements....

http://books.google.com/books?um=1&lr=...nG=Search+Books

Crisis in American institutions‎ - Page 184

Jerome H. Skolnick - Education - 1970 - 483 pages

....An example of this occurred recently in connection with the F-111B, the Navy's

fighter-bomber version of the TFX. Gordon W. Rule,

a civilian procurement official who had responsibility for the F-111B,

said in testimony before the House Subcommittee on Military Operations that

General Dynamics was in default on its contract

because the planes were too heavy to meet the height or range requirements.

Rule proposed in a memorandum to Deputy Secretary of Defense

Paul H. Nitze that the contract be terminated for default.

At the same time, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force Robert H. Charles and

Roger Lewis, the General Dynamics chairman, proposed that the Navy reimburse the company for all

costs and impose no penalty. Nitze's compromise was to make reimbursement of

$216.5-million, mostly to General Dynamics, and to impose a small penalty.

In a memo written last year Rule made this comment on the attitude of defense contractors:

"No matter how poor the quality, how late the product and how high the cost, they know nothing

will happen to them.

http://news.google.com/archivesearch?q=++n...1&scoring=a

NAVY AID FINDS SPENDING WASTE; He Testifies Industry 'Has Its Way' …

$3.95 - New York Times - May 7, 1969

A senior Navy procurement official charged today there was serious waste and inefficiency in defense spending because of a relationship between the defense

At today s hearing Representative William S. Moorhead of Pennsylvania made public a memorandum from Mr. Rule in November, 1968, to the then Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Nitze.

Gordon W. Rule, a retired Navy captain who is the director of the procurement control and contract clearance division in the office of the Chief of Naval the Naval Materiel.

Mr. Rule specifically pointed to one high-ranking official, whom he later identified as outgoing Assistant Secretary of Force Robert H. Charles.

Mr. Rule said today of Mr. -Charles: "I know one such Secretary who will tell you that he believes no defense contractor should be allowed to lose money on a Government contract and whose test of a contractor who has failed to live up to the terms of his contract is, 'Could any other contractor in that industry have done better?

Mr. Rule said that if General Dynamics did not like this, the company could appeal to the armed services Board of Contract Appeals, which arbitrates such disputes....

In the memorandum, he attacked a proposal being forwarded to Mr. Nitze by Mr. Charles that wo. uld have ter.

minated the contract on a con-: venience to theGovernment basis, which would have allowed General Dynamics compensation for all its costs.

Mr. Charles said today that Mr. Nitze had personally negotiated the final settlement with General Dynamics, and he merely served as an intermediary. ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for reviving this thread Tom,

and adding your continuing research.

I'd also like to add that this is the same Sydney Wilkerson who recruited the

"Hollywood Seven" special effects artists to review the Zapruder film as mentioned

by Doug Horne.

Maybe she could be persuaded to return to the forum and answer some questions

if people are civil.

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Good report on Adolph Schwimmer and his air plane stealing. Ole Schwimmer just passed on here recently.

http://www.tributes.com/show/Adolph-Schwimmer-91670188

What else did "they" steal? Rome's Clan Corporatism==>Permindex. IG Farbin methods==>NW 7.

Just go a little further and you can find the GOD that JFK found.

http://www.amazon.com/Fighting-D-Gold-Oil-Drugs/dp/0977795330

Ole Hitler may have been the first to use the NWO term, but all those that invested in his war games stole that idea, Germany's technologies, and lots of their successful mantra for political control and only the names of the players changed---as the spoils of war were rearranged.

The Bushs were big Hitler Germany investors, and they like the NWO term too.

Edited by Jim Phelps
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...