Jump to content
The Education Forum

Assassination Review Board finds proof of fourth bullet


Terry Adams
 Share

Recommended Posts

Updated: Gerald Ford's Role in the JFK Assassination Cover-Up by Don Fulsom (11/11/06; updated 3/12/07).In the 1990s, the Assassination Records Review Board released a strong clue that more than three shots were fired at President Kennedy.

The cover of an empty FBI evidence envelope – dated Dec. 2nd 1963 – noted that it had once held a 7.65 mm rifle shell that was found in Dealey Plaza after the shooting. The discovery of a fourth bullet shell, therefore, supports the acoustical evidence cited by the House committee, as well as all of the eyewitness reports of a shot from the grassy knoll.

I read this article today and thought that others may want to do so also, and discuss this finding.

Terry

The article is at: www.crimemagazine.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An extra shell CASING does NOT prove that there was an extra BULLET.

Notice how a bolt-action rifle works: after you chamber a round and fire, you are NOT required to eject that round at the location where it was fired.

Same thing applies to a lever action rifle, as I recently re-discovered while squirrel hunting. If you don't eject the empty casing after firing, it remains in the chamber of the rifle until you DO eject it, presumably to chamber another round.

The ONLY rifle that automatically ejects a spent shell casing when it is fired is either a semiautomatic, or a full automatic.

So the discovery of a spent shell CASING in Dealy Plaza only proves that one was LEFT there...NOT that it was FIRED there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An extra shell CASING does NOT prove that there was an extra BULLET.

Notice how a bolt-action rifle works: after you chamber a round and fire, you are NOT required to eject that round at the location where it was fired.

Same thing applies to a lever action rifle, as I recently re-discovered while squirrel hunting. If you don't eject the empty casing after firing, it remains in the chamber of the rifle until you DO eject it, presumably to chamber another round.

The ONLY rifle that automatically ejects a spent shell casing when it is fired is either a semiautomatic, or a full automatic.

So the discovery of a spent shell CASING in Dealy Plaza only proves that one was LEFT there...NOT that it was FIRED there.

Mark,

Then that would be true for the three shells found on the 6th floor as well, wouldn't it?

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well of course it would.

Presumably ballistics tests linked CE399 to the M-C, however. Do you recall when that test was completed?

Note that the DPD did not conduct a test to determine if the M-C had been fired on Nov 22, 1963.

Tim

I don't know very much about rifles and tests to determine if they were fired.

However, in a discussion with Gary Mack via e-mail about a year ago, Gary

stated there is no test available to determine if a rifle was fired recently,

to his knowledge.

Bill C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well of course it would.

Presumably ballistics tests linked CE399 to the M-C, however. Do you recall when that test was completed?

Note that the DPD did not conduct a test to determine if the M-C had been fired on Nov 22, 1963.

Tim

I don't know very much about rifles and tests to determine if they were fired.

However, in a discussion with Gary Mack via e-mail about a year ago, Gary

stated there is no test available to determine if a rifle was fired recently,

to his knowledge.

Bill C

You know, I would bet that the DPD and the Sheriff's dept. had plenty of rabbit hunters on the force. I don't know about any scientific test to determine if a gun has been fired or not, but if one sniffs the end of the barrel, he will know immediately if the gun has been shot recently. I remember when I hunted here in the hills of Kentucky as a young man that after I shot at game (whether I hit it or not) I could smell that the gun had been fired. Also, I remember later in the evening, as I was preparing to clean my gun, 2-3 hours (or more), that I could still detect the smell of gunpowder in the barrel.

Terry

Edited by Terry Adams
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well of course it would.

Presumably ballistics tests linked CE399 to the M-C, however. Do you recall when that test was completed?

Note that the DPD did not conduct a test to determine if the M-C had been fired on Nov 22, 1963.

Tim

I don't know very much about rifles and tests to determine if they were fired.

However, in a discussion with Gary Mack via e-mail about a year ago, Gary

stated there is no test available to determine if a rifle was fired recently,

to his knowledge.

Bill C

You know, I would bet that the DPD and the Sheriff's dept. had plenty of rabbit hunters on the force. I don't know about any scientific test to determine if a gun has been fired or not, but if one sniffs the end of the barrel, he will know immediately if the gun has been shot recently. I remember when I hunted here in the hills of Kentucky as a young man that after I shot at game (whether I hit it or not) I could smell that the gun had been fired. Also, I remember later in the evening, as I was preparing to clean my gun, 2-3 hours (or more), that I could still detect the smell of gunpowder in the barrel.

Terry

Terry

With your description of how to test if a rifle has been fired recently, it

seems we don't need a scientific test to determine it. You have to wonder if

any of those law enforcement officers who were on the sixth floor had the mind

set to do just what you described above. Going a step further, would the aroma

of gunpowder be on the casings that were found under the window of the sixth floor?

Thanks

Bill C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...