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Tina Towner Film


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This animation is 12 frames apart, or 1/2 second in time, if my information on the Towner camera FPS specs. is correct.

I used the concrete column edge as my anchor point.

They had just a few problems when they were changing the background on this. Aspect ratio/camera angle

Perhaps now we can apply this knowledge to other films and photos.

chris

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Michael,

How does the distance between stationary objects (tree branch, concrete column edge)(designated people,concrete column edge) change. This is by the same filmer within a 1/2 second.

How does the gentleman with the hat, in front of the column, enlarge.

Why does the background enlarge.

I was waiting for the patented parallax answer.

Oops. Same photographer. Not this time

chris

P.S.

Animation speed increased for movement clarity.

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The Towner Film is a good study in panning and the lens caused distortions that occur as the camera swings and is moved by the movements of the person filming (amatreur in this case) with a regular background and subject close. (TSBD and other fixed structures, moving Limo). Perspectives shift, though in a predictable fashion. Assuming otherwise is flawed. The lens is never perfect and the area of greatest truthful representation as embedded on the film surface can be quite small. When the subject is close and moving towards across and away in an everchanging relationship to the plane of the lens the distortions stand out the most. Professional Cinematographers are armed with a great array of lenses and planning that accommodates this. An off the shelf, amateurs camera used 'on the spur of the moment', is bound to produce interesting effects in many situations.

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This is beautiful indeed, Chris. Thanks!

JFK's gleaming white shirt collar at the back of his neck is clear as day.

Arguably the most under-rated piece of evidence in the entire case.

The SBT cannot be reconciled with the holes in JFK's clothing and the

Towner film showing the jacket collar in a normal position at the base

of JFK's neck.

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The Towner Film is a good study in panning and the lens caused distortions that occur as the camera swings and is moved by the movements of the person filming (amatreur in this case) with a regular background and subject close. (TSBD and other fixed structures, moving Limo). Perspectives shift, though in a predictable fashion. Assuming otherwise is flawed. The lens is never perfect and the area of greatest truthful representation as embedded on the film surface can be quite small. When the subject is close and moving towards across and away in an everchanging relationship to the plane of the lens the distortions stand out the most. Professional Cinematographers are armed with a great array of lenses and planning that accommodates this. An off the shelf, amateurs camera used 'on the spur of the moment', is bound to produce interesting effects in many situations.

Thanks John,

Would another of those oddities be a white antenna that becomes transparent, and allows one to see a human face through the transparent antenna?

chris

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Chris, yuo're welcome.

Possibilities: Antennas vibrate (naturally, engine rhythm (big thumpers the Harley, and by this time after running hot at low continuous speed prone to the odd backfire, gust of wind.), shutters are open for a defined period of time, the luminance of the face is 'strong'.

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Chris...would you post the two images separately without the animation?

The animation is interesting and you may be onto something odd...but

the frames are hard to study in motion.

I would like to compare the frames side by side, not in motion...and maybe

I can explain the oddities you see.

Jack

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