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Alen J Salerian, MD


Michael Hogan
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This article by Alen J. Salerian MD is relevant to Doug Horne's forthcoming book:

Dr. Salerian in Medical Hypotheses:Volume 71, Issue 4, Pages 475-624 (October 2008)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=P...80feabfa5a26f09

Alan Salerian believes that "President Kennedy’s throat wound was caused by a flechette-transported poison," which paralyzed the President and rendered him

"immobilized and speechless for several seconds before a frontal entry bullet shattered his skull."

http://www.historicalevidence.net/?p=60

He also posits that it was a smiling Lucien Conein in Dealey Plaza, captured in a photograph. A.J. Weberman has offered evidence that it was not Conein.

Also:

"On November 22, the first exhibition of Dr. Alen Salerian’s paintings will happen in a private venue in honor and remembrance of President John F. Kennedy and his ideals. His assassination on the date in 1963, has been the backdrop and catalyst to this emotionally sweeping visual homage the painter calls JFK: Symbols on Canvas.

Created in less than a year 'These 80 works took over my life because as I read more about that period in our history, my hand was driven to explain the inexplicable loss all people felt when that great statesman and his hopes were extinguished.' Public exhibitions are being planned, but for a glimpse of the collection browse our gallery below:"

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This article by Alen J. Salerian MD is relevant to Doug Horne's forthcoming book:

Dr. Salerian in Medical Hypotheses:Volume 71, Issue 4, Pages 475-624 (October 2008)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=P...80feabfa5a26f09

Alan Salerian believes that "President Kennedy’s throat wound was caused by a flechette-transported poison," which paralyzed the President and rendered him

"immobilized and speechless for several seconds before a frontal entry bullet shattered his skull."

http://www.historicalevidence.net/?p=60

He also posits that it was a smiling Lucien Conein in Dealey Plaza, captured in a photograph. A.J. Weberman has offered evidence that it was not Conein.

Also:

"On November 22, the first exhibition of Dr. Alen Salerian’s paintings will happen in a private venue in honor and remembrance of President John F. Kennedy and his ideals. His assassination on the date in 1963, has been the backdrop and catalyst to this emotionally sweeping visual homage the painter calls JFK: Symbols on Canvas.

Created in less than a year 'These 80 works took over my life because as I read more about that period in our history, my hand was driven to explain the inexplicable loss all people felt when that great statesman and his hopes were extinguished.' Public exhibitions are being planned, but for a glimpse of the collection browse our gallery below:"

Thanks for the heads up on that Michael,

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=A...a719003efec6724

Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

The postmortem examination of President Kennedy is invalid: The evidence

Alen J. Salerian

Washington Center for Psychiatry, 5225 Wisconsin Avenue # 104, Washington, District of columbia 20015, USA

Received 29 May 2008;

accepted 1 June 2008.

Available online 20 August 2008.

Summary

This paper proves that President Kennedy’s postmortem examination is a sham. The sham nature of the presidential autopsy is based upon several findings incompatible with human anatomy, practice of medicine and Newton’s second law “an object acted upon by a constant force will move with constant acceleration in the direction of the force”. We review the autopsy report and other assassination evidence and demonstrate that the postmortem examination is invalid.

http://www.historicalevidence.net/oswalds-...e-death-of-jfk/

San Diego, CA, March 21, 2009 – Noted Washington psychiatrist Dr. Alen J. Salerian presented a lecture titled “The Double Murders of President Kennedy and Lee Harvey Oswald Are Not Good for America: The Evidence” at the 27th Annual Symposium of the American College of Forensic Psychiatry in San Diego.

Dr. Salerian’s presentation included a review and analysis of documents from President Kennedy’s medical records from Parkland Hospital in Dallas, ballistic evidence, witness reports, photographic and film images from the scene of the assassination and Newton’s Second Law of Motion.

The evidence Dr. Salerian presented included the following:

1. President Kennedy suffered three wounds, none of which was inflicted by Oswald.

2. President Kennedy’s throat wound was caused by a flechette-transported poison, probably with a main chemical or chemicals that are d-tubocurarine, or a d-tubocurarine-like substance with rapid paralyzing action. In 1975, CIA Director William Colby’s testimony at a U.S. Senate hearing before the Senate’s Special Intelligence Committee described such a neurotoxin.

3. Because of the paralysis caused by the poison, President Kennedy was immobilized and speechless for several seconds before a frontal entry bullet shattered his skull.

4. A second bullet struck President Kennedy with posterior entry 6.5 inches below his neckline and was lodged in his chest.

Contact: Alan Hermesch, 202-210-6262, 301-365-4762,

BK: Has anybody actually read this paper?

Edited by William Kelly
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Did that flechette make it through the windshield? Who fired it, from what distance and velocity? What's the accuracy and capability of flechette weapons c. 1963?

If you put a bullet in my shoulder and another in my throat, I'd be pretty immobilized and speechless, too. If one nicked my spine, I might not even be able to pull my wife down to safety.

So little time, so many bullets. Was there time for a flechette?

Why bother with a flechette to the throat, which might have struck his face or clothing, and been witnessed by people? Why not put it in the back or neck from above?

Was the throat the intended target? Would we say that the throat was the intended target of anyone firing a bullet from the front?

Did this flechette issue from a weapon mounted inside the limo, aimed precisely at JFK's throat using the rear-view mirrors?

A frontal throat flechette wound strikes me as implausible for the same reasons that a clear frontal shot from the TSBD toward the limo on Houston Street does - just not decisive enough. Much risk, no guarantee.

These are the problems created by the absence of the bullet causing the throat wound.

I did like some of Dr. Salerian's paintings, though.

Edited by David Andrews
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Did that flechette make it through the windshield? Who fired it, from what distance and velocity? What's the accuracy and capability of flechette weapons c. 1963?

If you put a bullet in my shoulder and another in my throat, I'd be pretty immobilized and speechless, too. If one nicked my spine, I might not even be able to pull my wife down to safety.

So little time, so many bullets. Was there time for a flechette?

Why bother with a flechette to the throat, which might have struck his face or clothing, and been witnessed by people? Why not put it in the back or neck from above?

Was the throat the intended target? Would we say that the throat was the intended target of anyone firing a bullet from the front?

Did this flechette issue from a weapon mounted inside the limo, aimed precisely at JFK's throat using the rear-view mirrors?

A frontal throat flechette wound strikes me as implausible for the same reasons that a clear frontal shot from the TSBD toward the limo on Houston Street does - just not decisive enough. Much risk, no guarantee.

These are the problems created by the absence of the bullet causing the throat wound.

I did like some of Dr. Salerian's paintings, though.

The Umbrella Man sent the flechette into Kennedy's throat. Maybe it didn't matter where it hit him; it would still have the same effect of paralysis.

I'm so used to seeing the Zapruder Film slow that when played normally, it seems impossible that anyone could shoot him -- a moving target. So that brings in the limo stop which was erased from the Zapruder Film. Someone got a good shot in because the limo stopped where the Cuban Exile so boldly indicated.

Kathy C

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I did like some of Dr. Salerian's paintings, though.

Paintings? :rolleyes: A bullet from the front went through the windshield.

Proving the immobilization theory is a tuff one. This guy is an MD. Are you an MD? He is also a painter , I know.The fact is Kennedy was hit by something that caused an entry wound to the throat; caused his arms to raise, immobilized him and made him unable to speak. He was clearly softened up for the kill, then Cuban Man raised his arm to give the go ahead for the fatal shot.

One has to ask the question why would this man raise his arm a few feet from the dying President of the United States if he were not in on the deed?

He was not waiving an innocent hello!

He had NO business being there.

He did not flee in panic nor did he run away out of fear of being caught.

Lets look at what this MD has to say and why he feels the way he does.

Edited by Peter McGuire
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Did that flechette make it through the windshield? Who fired it, from what distance and velocity? What's the accuracy and capability of flechette weapons c. 1963?

If you put a bullet in my shoulder and another in my throat, I'd be pretty immobilized and speechless, too. If one nicked my spine, I might not even be able to pull my wife down to safety.

So little time, so many bullets. Was there time for a flechette?

Why bother with a flechette to the throat, which might have struck his face or clothing, and been witnessed by people? Why not put it in the back or neck from above?

Was the throat the intended target? Would we say that the throat was the intended target of anyone firing a bullet from the front?

Did this flechette issue from a weapon mounted inside the limo, aimed precisely at JFK's throat using the rear-view mirrors?

A frontal throat flechette wound strikes me as implausible for the same reasons that a clear frontal shot from the TSBD toward the limo on Houston Street does - just not decisive enough. Much risk, no guarantee.

These are the problems created by the absence of the bullet causing the throat wound.

I did like some of Dr. Salerian's paintings, though.

David

Have you ever read "The Umbrella Man" by Robert Cutler?

I recommend this book to everyone, but as far as the flechette dart and TUM go this book will tell you everything you want to know

The only problem is that this book is very rare and very expensive

Let me find some scans to post

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Did that flechette make it through the windshield? Who fired it, from what distance and velocity? What's the accuracy and capability of flechette weapons c. 1963?

If you put a bullet in my shoulder and another in my throat, I'd be pretty immobilized and speechless, too. If one nicked my spine, I might not even be able to pull my wife down to safety.

So little time, so many bullets. Was there time for a flechette?

Why bother with a flechette to the throat, which might have struck his face or clothing, and been witnessed by people? Why not put it in the back or neck from above?

Was the throat the intended target? Would we say that the throat was the intended target of anyone firing a bullet from the front?

Did this flechette issue from a weapon mounted inside the limo, aimed precisely at JFK's throat using the rear-view mirrors?

A frontal throat flechette wound strikes me as implausible for the same reasons that a clear frontal shot from the TSBD toward the limo on Houston Street does - just not decisive enough. Much risk, no guarantee.

These are the problems created by the absence of the bullet causing the throat wound.

I did like some of Dr. Salerian's paintings, though.

David

Have you ever read "The Umbrella Man" by Robert Cutler?

I recommend this book to everyone, but as far as the flechette dart and TUM go this book will tell you everything you want to know

The only problem is that this book is very rare and very expensive

Let me find some scans to post

Apparently Fletcher Prouty believed the Umbrella was loaded with some kind of poison. I hate to quote from McAdams. So if someone finds that this info is wrong, don't blame the messenger.

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/prouty_tum.htm

Kathy C

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Did that flechette make it through the windshield? Who fired it, from what distance and velocity? What's the accuracy and capability of flechette weapons c. 1963?

If you put a bullet in my shoulder and another in my throat, I'd be pretty immobilized and speechless, too. If one nicked my spine, I might not even be able to pull my wife down to safety.

So little time, so many bullets. Was there time for a flechette?

Why bother with a flechette to the throat, which might have struck his face or clothing, and been witnessed by people? Why not put it in the back or neck from above?

Was the throat the intended target? Would we say that the throat was the intended target of anyone firing a bullet from the front?

Did this flechette issue from a weapon mounted inside the limo, aimed precisely at JFK's throat using the rear-view mirrors?

A frontal throat flechette wound strikes me as implausible for the same reasons that a clear frontal shot from the TSBD toward the limo on Houston Street does - just not decisive enough. Much risk, no guarantee.

These are the problems created by the absence of the bullet causing the throat wound.

I did like some of Dr. Salerian's paintings, though.

David

Have you ever read "The Umbrella Man" by Robert Cutler?

I recommend this book to everyone, but as far as the flechette dart and TUM go this book will tell you everything you want to know

The only problem is that this book is very rare and very expensive

Let me find some scans to post

I could find only 1 used copy of The Umbrella Man by Robert Cutler. Amazon alone has it. It's priced at $96. It was published in 1975. I looked on eBay, Barnes and Nobles, half.com, Booksamillion, Borders books. I tried The Last Hurrah Bookshop; they must be out of business -- anyone know what happened? Only amazon.com has it.

Kathy C

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Did that flechette make it through the windshield? Who fired it, from what distance and velocity? What's the accuracy and capability of flechette weapons c. 1963?

If you put a bullet in my shoulder and another in my throat, I'd be pretty immobilized and speechless, too. If one nicked my spine, I might not even be able to pull my wife down to safety.

So little time, so many bullets. Was there time for a flechette?

Why bother with a flechette to the throat, which might have struck his face or clothing, and been witnessed by people? Why not put it in the back or neck from above?

Was the throat the intended target? Would we say that the throat was the intended target of anyone firing a bullet from the front?

Did this flechette issue from a weapon mounted inside the limo, aimed precisely at JFK's throat using the rear-view mirrors?

A frontal throat flechette wound strikes me as implausible for the same reasons that a clear frontal shot from the TSBD toward the limo on Houston Street does - just not decisive enough. Much risk, no guarantee.

These are the problems created by the absence of the bullet causing the throat wound.

I did like some of Dr. Salerian's paintings, though.

David

Have you ever read "The Umbrella Man" by Robert Cutler?

I recommend this book to everyone, but as far as the flechette dart and TUM go this book will tell you everything you want to know

The only problem is that this book is very rare and very expensive

Let me find some scans to post

I could find only 1 used copy of The Umbrella Man by Robert Cutler. Amazon alone has it. It's priced at $96. It was published in 1975. I looked on eBay, Barnes and Nobles, half.com, Booksamillion, Borders books. I tried The Last Hurrah Bookshop; they must be out of business -- anyone know what happened? Only amazon.com has it.

Kathy C

Yes Kathy I know what happened

It has been OOP since 1975, it is very rare, it is a very important book, and researchers are willing to pay over $100.00 for a copy of it

I own alot of books on the assassination that are worth alot of money

Any of Penn Jones original books are going to cost you an arm and a leg

Bloody Treason by Noel Twyman has always been expensive

The hardcover version of "The Killing of a President" by Robert Groden always goes for over $60.00 on Ebay

I think $96.00 is a great deal because im sure it will be a long time before one comes up on Ebay or Amazon again and the next time it does it could be priced alot higher

Here is a picture of two of my Cutler books

l_c4e876eb1dee4a678ce30c1883560ac0.jpg

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So where was the flechette at Parkland?

As much as I feel that the person that I believe is TUM is perhaps the only man (outside of Gordon Liddy) willing and able to fire an umbrella flechette gun at a moving president in a public street at broad noon, I don't believe that this happened at all, and I think that the flechette story is a dodge and an obfuscation.

We know of umbrella-point toxin stabs in KGB wetwork. Is there one known case of US or other flechette gun use in an assassination, kidnapping, or like?

Does anybody think, or know, that such a throat shot is possible today with any dart equipment?

Again, what if the dart had struck JFK in the face in front of crowds?

Has anybody ever checked TUM's position to see if he could have hit Kennedy with such weaponry, windshield or no?

Why, again, was it necessary to paralyze Kennedy in a two-block sized kill zone?

I suspect strongly that in an Algens 6 where the windshield is not retouched (unlike the TSBD doorway) you can see Kellerman eyeing the hole in the windshield made by the bullet that has just struck JFK's throat.

Can anyone get Dr Salerian on the Forum, with all respect as a researcher accorded?

BTW, where does the dart theory originate? Does it pre-date HSCA? I may have known this in the 70s, but have forgotten now.

Edited by David Andrews
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So where was the flechette at Parkland?

As much as I feel that the person that I believe is TUM is perhaps the only man (outside of Gordon Liddy) willing and able to fire an umbrella flechette gun at a moving president in a public street at broad noon, I don't believe that this happened at all, and I think that the flechette story is a dodge and an obfuscation.

We know of umbrella-point toxin stabs in KGB wetwork. Is there one known case of US or other flechette gun use in an assassination, kidnapping, or like?

Does anybody think, or know, that such a throat shot is possible today with any dart equipment?

Again, what if the dart had struck JFK in the face in front of crowds?

Has anybody ever checked TUM's position to see if he could have hit Kennedy with such weaponry, windshield or no?

Why, again, was it necessary to paralyze Kennedy in a two-block sized kill zone?

I suspect strongly that in an Algens 6 where the windshield is not retouched (unlike the TSBD doorway) you can see Kellerman eyeing the hole in the windshield made by the bullet that has just struck JFK's throat.

Can anyone get Dr Salerian on the Forum, with all respect as a researcher accorded?

BTW, where does the dart theory originate? Does it pre-date HSCA? I may have known this in the 70s, but have forgotten now.

David

I think Richard Sprauge and Robert Cutler came up with the idea from Fletcher Prouty

Im not sure if anything was published before Cutlers "TUM" in 1975

I dont remember were I heard this, but I do recall hearing that the poision dart disinegrated after entry into the body

I dont subscribe to the Umbrella Man/dart theory either

But I do think its an interesting theory and I did as much reading on the subject as I could years ago, and just re-read "The Umbrella Man" and "Seventy Six Seconds In Dealey Plaza" again a couple weeks ago and got a little boost about the dart theory

But I still dont think it happened that way

Dean

Edited by Dean Hagerman
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I forgot to add Robert Cutlers "Seventy Six Seconds in Dealey Plaza" also goes into great detail about TUM/Dart theory, its the sequel to "The Umbrella Man"

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The Umbrella Man sent the flechette into Kennedy's throat. Maybe it didn't matter where it hit him; it would still have the same effect of paralysis.

Please tell me this is a joke. It's too incredible even to be part of a James Bond plot.

* How did Umbrella Man aim the device?

* What were the odds of him missing and hitting Jackie, or someone over the street?

* Was it really necessary to paralyse the President in order to assist the crack hit squad?

* Why didn't the Umbrella Man stand further up the street, so he could paralyse JFK before the first shot was fired?

* Who was that man later identified as the Umbrella Man who gave a reasonable explanation of his actions?

This list could be expanded. It's a ridiculous, laughable notion.

Paul.

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* Who was that man later identified as the Umbrella Man who gave a reasonable explanation of his actions?

:lol:

Louis Witt was the person you are talking about (I dont know how you can bring him up without knowing his name)

And his explanation of his actions were laughable, he didnt say one thing that was on par with what TUM was seen doing in film and pictures

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