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Rufus Taylor


Tim Gratz
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Has anyone heard of Vice Admiral Rufus Taylor?

He had a long career in naval intelligence including analysis of Japanese codes in World War II. He was second or third in command of naval intelligence in 1959 and thereafter became Director of Naval Intelligence.

In 1966 he was appointed Deputy Director of the CIA by LBJ. In that capacity, according to a j weberman's nodules, he was called upon by Helms to clean up Nosenko's "bona fides" and he took the position that Nosenko was a bona fide defector.

He died of natural causes at the age of 68 in September of 1978.

Some people think that when LHO defected to the Soviet Union he many have been working for a branch of military intelligence, perhaps ONI. If that was indeed the case, then it is not unreasonable to assume Vice Admiral Taylor may have known of the Oswald case. Curious then that when he was working for the CIA he became involved in the Nosenko matter.

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Tim

Toss in this quote:

The Commission got the "original Oswald file" from the Office of Naval Intelligence, another compilation of selections from at least three other files. Admiral Rufus Taylor gave instructions "to prepare a file." The original files were even withheld from his superiors in the Defense Department!

Peter Dale Scott comments: "Admiral Taylor's decision to have a file prepared, rather than share raw data, is further evidence that the original files with Oswald records contained truths quite different than those eventually given to the public... The absence of a single file on Oswald might suggest that Oswald was not simply a subject for external investigation, so much as someone with a special relationship to ONI itself."

And now you want to add that he was involved with breaking the Japanese Naval Code (along with John Hurt)? You've got my attention.

As a sidelight, also involved with the "Liberty" affair.

Jim Root

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Tim,

Very interesting.

Jim, what's the John Hurt connection to the Japanese Naval Codes?

- lee

http://www.groverproctor.us/jfk/jfk-hurtinterview.html

Excerpts of Interview with John David Hurt

PROCTOR:

Do you know any reason why Oswald would have tried to call you?

HURT:

I do not. I never heard of the man before President Kennedy's death. I was a great Kennedyphile, and I would have been more inclined to kill him than anything else.

PROCTOR:

Oswald, you mean.

HURT:

Yes

PROCTOR:

Did you place a call that day to the Dallas jail?

HURT:

No, I did not, and he didn't place a call to me either, I don't know how I ever got [unintelligible].

PROCTOR:

Do you have any explanation as to why your name ...

HURT:

None whatever.

PROCTOR:

Do you have the telephone number 833-1253 (the second number on the slip) in any of your business associations?

HURT:

No.

PROCTOR:

Did you in 1963?

HURT:

No, I did not.

PROCTOR:

That was the other number listed on the telephone slip beside your name.

HURT:

I don't know. My number has been the same for, oh, I'd say forty years.

PROCTOR:

In speaking with another investigator that called you about six years ago, you indicated at that time that during World War II you were in the Counterintelligence Division. Is that correct?

HURT:

That's correct.

PROCTOR:

You left that, and went into investigative work after the war.

HURT:

I was in insurance claims adjusting work, and I worked for a year for the state as a [unintelligible].

PROCTOR:

Were you ever involved as an agent in the Defense Department's Industrial Security Command?

HURT:

No, I was not.

PROCTOR:

So, once again, you have no knowledge of any call made from your number or to your number that day?

HURT:

No knowledge whatsover.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpts of Interview With Victor Marchetti

PROCTOR:

If you were, as an agent, in trouble somewhere in America ....

MARCHETTI:

I was never an agent. I was an officer.

PROCTOR:

Okay, if someone were an agent, and he were involved in something, and nobody believes he is an agent. He is arrested, and trying to communicate, let's say, and he is one of you guys. What is the procedure?

MARCHETTI:

I'd kill him.

PROCTOR:

If I were an agent for the [Central Intelligence] Agency, and I was involved in something involving the law domestically and the FBI, would I have a contact to call?

MARCHETTI:

Yes.

PROCTOR:

A verification contact?

MARCHETTI:

Yes, you would.

PROCTOR:

Would I be dead?

MARCHETTI:

It would depend on the situation. If you get into bad trouble, we're not going to verify you. No how, no way.

PROCTOR:

But there is a call mechanism set up.

MARCHETTI:

Yes.

PROCTOR:

So it is conceivable that Lee Harvey Oswald was ....

MARCHETTI:

That's what he was doing. He was trying to call in and say, "Tell them I'm all right."

PROCTOR:

Was that his death warrant?

MARCHETTI:

You betcha. Because this time he went over the dam, whether he knew it or not, or whether they set him up or not. He was over the dam. At this point it was executive action [assassination].

PROCTOR:

Is the contact person's name ever the name of someone who is not necessarily an active agent but is just a contact person?

MARCHETTI:

That's right.

PROCTOR:

Then that person would go up to the next level?

MARCHETTI:

That's right, and it would be a "funny name" -- a pseudonym. Like for example, you would have a number to call. If you were my agent, and you got yourself into a peck of trouble, you might try to contact me, but maybe you can't get through.

PROCTOR:

I would contact you by telephone, right?

MARCHETTI:

Yes. But I might have covered my tracks real good so you can't contact me by telephone. In other words, I contact you, you don't contact me. But I give you a [unintelligible] number. So you call him, but I've already talked to him and said, "Don't touch him." You're screwed up.

PROCTOR:

But you would use, for that middle man, people who were not necessarily active agents or agency people, right?

MARCHETTI:

That's right. Most likely they would be cut-outs. You would have to call indirectly.

PROCTOR:

Could Oswald have had a name ....

MARCHETTI:

He was probably calling his cut-out. He was calling somebody who could put him in touch with his case officer. He couldn't go beyond that person. There's no way he could. He just had to depend on this person to say, "Okay, I'll deliver the message." Now, if the cut-out has already been alerted to cut him off and ignore him, then [unintelligible].

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Tim

Can you provide or point me in a direction to get more info on Rufus Taylor's military career (some sort of outline would be perfect). I see he was in Japan following Maxwell Taylor but cannot find out his job discription while in Japan (Maxwell Taylor was in China).

Would love to find his billets from the late 1920's till 1959 when he was put in charge of Naval Intelligence. When did he enter Naval Intel?

Over the years I have developed some interesting information dealing with Naval Intel and Army Intel as well as Eisenhower era service infighting that pitted the Army and Navy vs the Air Force for funding and project support. The Polaris missile development and the Army missile program are of interest in this area. Interesting cooperation in these areas that at times included Maxwell Taylor and Edwin Walker.

I keep thinking more and more about the "Liberty" affair! Do you know much about it (especially Frontlet 615)?

Jim Root

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JIM

According to the namebase web-site, Taylor is mentioned in these books:

Adams,S. War of Numbers. 1994 (162)

Bamford,J. The Puzzle Palace. 1982 (230)

Corson,W. Trento,S.& J. Widows. 1989 (177, 181-2, 194, 419)

Epstein,E. Deception. 1989 (293)

Mader,J. Who's Who in CIA. 1968

Mangold,T. Cold Warrior. 1991 (194)

Marchetti,V. Marks,J. The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence. 1974 (96)

Martin,D. Wilderness of Mirrors. 1981 (175-6)

Powers,T. The Man Who Kept the Secrets. 1981 (246, 398)

Quirk,J. Central Intelligence Agency: A Photographic History. 1986 (233)

Riebling,M. Wedge. 1994 (237-8, 243-4)

Trento,J. The Secret History of the CIA. 2001 (503)

Vistica,G. Fall From Glory. 1997 (49, 52)

Washington Post 1978-09-20 (B8)

West,N. The Circus. 1984 (247)

Wise,D. Ross,T. The Espionage Establishment. 1967 (140)

pages cited this search: 26

I have access to Riebling's book ("Wedge") and Trento's "The Secret History of the CIA" and will post this info tomorrow (books not with me). Does annyone have access to the other books and can help this line of research?

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Jim wrote:

I keep thinking more and more about the "Liberty" affair! Do you know much about it (especially Frontlet 615)?

Following is an excerpt from Pages 300/301 of Helms' autobiography:

---------------------------------------------------------

One of the most disturbing incidents in the six days [war between Israel and the surrounding Arab states] came on the morning of June 8[, 1967] when the Pentagon flashed(urgent top-priority precedence) a message that the U.S.S. Liberty, an unarmed U.S. Navy communications(spy) ship, was under attack in the Mediterranean, and that American fighters had been scrambled to defend the ship....

.... The following urgent reports showed that Israeli jet fighters and torpedo boats had launched the attack. The seriously damaged Liberty remained afloat, with thirty-four dead and more than a hundred wounded members of the crew.

Israeli authorities subsequently apologized for the accident, but few in Washington could believe that the ship had not been identified as an American naval vessel. Later, an interim intelligence memorandum concluded that the attack was a mistake and "not made in malice against the U.S." When additional evidence was available, more doubt was raised....

... This prompted my Deputy, Admiral Rufus Taylor, to write me his view of the incident. "To me, the picture thus far presents the distinct possibility that the Israelis knew that the Liberty might be their target and attacked anyway, either through confusion in Command and Control or through deliberate disregard of instructions on the part of subordinates."

The day after the attack, President Johnson, bristling with irritation, said to me, "The New York Times" put that attack on the Liberty on an inside page. It should have been on the front page!"

I had no role in the board of inquiry that followed, or the board's finding that there could be no doubt that the Israeli's knew exactly what they were doing in attacking the Liberty. I have yet to understand why it was felt necessary to attack this ship or who ordered the attack.

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More information re Rufus Taylor:

Paul H. Nitze, "Instructions for the coordination and control of the Navy's clandestine intelligence collection program," December 7, 1965. Top Secret, 5 pp.

The U.S. Navy had conducted clandestine human intelligence operations during the 1930s and World War II. By the mid-1960s the Navy, however, was largely out of the clandestine HUMINT business. Then, in 1965, Admiral Rufus Taylor asked Thomas Duval and Thomas Saunders to set up a Navy HUMINT program. Despite some concern by senior Navy officers about the "flap potential," their proposal was approved - resulting in this memorandum from Secretary of the Navy Paul Nitze. The memorandum provides a rationale for the creation of a new HUMINT organzation, relevant definitions, and establishes the responsibilities of senior officials. With regard to security, the memo mandates that very existence of the program be classified Secret.

Nitze's memo would lead to the establishment, in 1966, of the Naval Field Operations Support Group (NFOSG) to conduct clandestine HUMINT operations. It would soon be given an alternative designation - Task Force 157 - by which it would become more commonly known.

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This is from Victor Marchetti concerning his efforts to publish "The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence:"

What I learned in my dealings with Congressmen, in the CIA and after leaving, was that the men who wanted to change the situation didn't have the power, while those who had the power didn't want any change. With Congress a hopeless case, and the White House already in the know and well satisfied to let the CIA continue to operate in secrecy, I decided to talk to the press. I gave my first interview to U.S. News and World Report, and that started the ball rolling. Soon I was in touch with publishers in New York, talking about doing a book.

I soon got a telephone call from Admiral Rufus Taylor, who had been my boss in the agency, but by that time had retired. He told me to meet him at a motel in the Virginia suburbs, across the Potomac from Washington. My suspicions aroused by the remoteness of the room from the office, I was greeted by Admiral Taylor, who had thoughtfully brought along a large supply of liquor: a bottle of scotch, a bottle of bourbon, a bottle of vodka, a bottle of gin ... "I couldn't remember what you liked," he told me, "so I brought one of everything."

I began to make noise: flushing the toilet, washing my hands, turning on the television. Admiral Taylor was right behind me, turning everything off. I kept making noise, jingling the ice in my glass and so on, until the admiral sat down. There was a table with a lamp on it between the admiral's chair and the one which he now told me to sit down on. He looked at me with a little twinkle in his eye: the lamp was bugged, of course.

We talked, and Admiral Taylor told me the CIA was worried about what I might write in my book. He proposed a deal: I was to give no more interviews, write no more articles, and to stay away from Capitol Hill. I could write my book, and then let him and other retired senior officers look it over, and they would advise me and the agency. After that the CIA and I could resolve our differences. I told him, "Fair enough." We had a drink on it, and went out to dinner. That was our deal

What I didn't know was that a few nights later John Erlichman and Richard Nixon would be sitting in the White House discussing my book. There is a tape of their discussion, "President Nixon, John Ehrlichman, 45 minutes, subject Victor Marchetti," which is still sealed: I can't get it Ehrlichman told me through contacts that if I listened to the tape I would learn exactly what happened to me and why.

Whatever the details of their conversation were, the president of the United States had decided I should not publish my book. I was to be the first writer in American history to be served with an official censorship order served by a court of the United States, because President Nixon did not want to be embarrassed, nor did he want the CIA to be investigated and reformed: that would have hampered his ability to use it for his own purposes. A few days later, on April 18, 1972, I received a federal injunction restraining me from revealing any "intelligence information." After more than a year of court battles, CIA and the Cult of Intelligence was published. The courts allowed the CIA to censor it in advance, and as a result the book appeared with more than a hundred holes for CIA-ordered deletions. Later editions show previously deleted words and lines, which the court ordered the CIA to restore in boldface or italics. The book is therefore difficult to read, indeed something of a curiosity piece. And of course all the information which was ordered cut out ended up leaking to the public anyway.

All this was done to help the CIA suppress and distort history, and to enable presidents to do the same. Presidents like Harry Truman, who claimed falsely that "I never had any thought when I set up the CIA that it would be injected into peacetime cloak-and-dagger operations," but who willingly employed the agency to carry out clandestine espionage and covert intervention in the affairs of other countries. Or Dwight Eisenhower, who denied that we were attempting to overthrow Sukarno in Indonesia, when we were, and was embarrassed when he tried to deny the CIA's U-2 overflights and was shown up by Khruschev at Paris in 1960. John F. Kennedy, as everyone knows by now, employed the CIA in several attempts to assassinate Fidel Castro. We used everyone from Mafia hoods to Castro's mistress, Marita Lorenz (who was supposed to poison the dictator with pills concealed in her cold cream -- the pills melted). I have no doubt that if we could have killed Castro, the U.S. would have gone in.

There was a fairly widespread belief that one reason Kennedy was assassinated was because he was going to get us out of Vietnam. Don't you believe it He was the CIA's kind of president, rough, tough, and gung-ho. Under Kennedy we became involved in Vietnam in a serious way, not so much militarily as through covert action. It is a fact that the United States engineered the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem, South Vietnam's premier, and Ngo Dinh Nhu, his powerful brother. A cable was sent out to the ambassador which said, "If Lou Conein goofs up [Lucien Conein was a key CIA operative in Saigon], it's his responsibility." So when E. Howard Hunt faked these memos and cables when he was working for the "plumbers" on behalf of President Nixon (and against the Democrats), he knew what he was doing. That was his defense, that he wasn't really forging or inventing anything. "Stuff like that really existed, but I couldn't find it," he said. Of course Hunt couldn't find it by that time the original documents were gone. But Hunt knew what he was doing.

President Nixon's obsession with secrecy led to the end of his presidency, of course. As indicated earlier, Nixon was determined to suppress my book. On several occasions after his resignation, Nixon has been asked what he meant when he said that the CIA would help him cover up the Watergate tapes, because "they owed him one." He has responded, "I was talking about Marchetti," in other words the efforts (still secret) to prevent The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence from being published.

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Good Day Tim.... Thank You. Very interesting, indeed.

According to the ONI history info available here....

http://www.fas.org/irp/agency/oni/history.htm

.... Vice-Admiral RUFUS L. TAYLOR was the first Intelligence Specialist to hold the position of Director of Naval Intelligence, and was so appointed sometime in 1963. (anyone have the date?)

The ARRB requested that the Navy and its Office of Naval Intelligence search for the records of Director of TAYLOR. The ARRB Review Board had acquired a copy of an unsigned September 21, 1964, affidavit regarding OSWALD that TAYLOR appears to have executed and forwarded to the Secretary of Defense McNAMARA. The affidavit states that that ONI never utilized Lee Harvey Oswald as an agent or an informant. As far as I know, the ONI did not locate any files belonging to TAYLOR.

Also from the ARRB final report, chapter 6, "The Quest for Additional Information and Records in Federal Government Offices"....

(QUOTE)

The question of whether the Marine Corps conducted a post-assassination investigation and produced a written report on former Marine Private Lee Harvey Oswald, circa late 1963 and early 1964, has never been resolved to the satisfaction of the public. Similarly, many have wondered whether the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) conducted a post-defection "net damage assessment" investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald circa 1959 or 1960. Various former Oswald associates and military investigators have recalled separate investigations. (3) Researchers have also questioned whether Oswald was an "authentic" defector, a "false defector" in a program run by an agency of the U.S. government, or a false defector sent on a mission to the U.S.S.R. for a particular purpose and then used for different purposes by some members of the

intelligence community following his return to the United States.

a. U.S. Marine Corps records.

The Review Board asked the Marine Corps to search for any records relating to

post-assassination investigations that the U.S. Marine Corps might have completed, as some researchers believe. The U.S. Marine Corps searched files at both U.S. Marine Corps HQ in Quantico, and at the Federal Records Center in Suitland, Maryland, but the Marine Corps did not locate evidence of any internal investigations of Lee Harvey Oswald, other than correspondence already published in the Warren Report.

i. U.S. Marine Headquarters copy of enlisted personnel file and medical file. In

1997, the Review Board transferred to the JFK Collection at NARA the original

(paper) copies of Lee Harvey Oswald's U.S. Marine Corps Enlisted Personnel

File, and Medical Treatment File. Previously, these files had been maintained

at U.S. Marine Corps Headquarters in Quantico, Virginia and had only been

available in microfiche format in response to Freedom of Information Act

(FOIA) requests that people made to the Marine Corps.

ii. Additional relevant U.S. Marine Corps unit diaries. The Review Board

obtained from U.S. Marine Corps Headquarters at Quantico, Virginia,

additional official U.S. Marine Corps unit diaries from the units in which

Oswald served. These additional diaries complement the partial collection of

unit diaries gathered by the HSCA. Together, the Review Board and HSCA

unit diary records appear to constitute a complete unit diary record for

Oswald. Researchers can compare the in and out transfer dates in Oswald's

personnel file with the original entries in the pertinent diaries to which they

correspond.

b. Military identification card.

To resolve questions about whether Oswald's DD1173 Military Identification card provided some indication that Oswald had a connection to CIA, the Review Board requested and received additional information from the Federal Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri, from the personnel files of other Marines who had served with Oswald (for comparison purposes), and from the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Army's Military History Institute.

c. Possible ONI post-defection investigation.

The Review Board became aware of an individual named Fred Reeves of California, who was reputed to have been in charge of a post-defection "net damage assessment" of Oswald by the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) shortly after Oswald's defection to the U.S.S.R. The Review Board contacted Reeves, interviewed him twice by telephone, then flew him to Washington, D.C., where the Review Board staff interviewed him in person. (4)

In 1959, Reeves was a civilian Naval Intelligence Operations Specialist. (5) Reeves told the Review Board that a week or so after Oswald defected to the U.S.S.R., two officers from ONI in Washington, D.C., (6) called him and asked him to conduct a background investigation at the Marine Corps Air Station in El Toro, CaliforniaOswald's last duty station before his discharge from the Marine Corps. Reeves said that he went to El Toro, copied Oswald's enlisted personnel file, obtained the names of many of his associates, and mailed this information to ONI in Washington, D.C. He said that ONI in Washington ran the post-defection investigation of Oswald, and that the Washington officers then directed various agents in the field. Although Reeves did not interview anyone himself, he said that later (circa late 1959 or early 1960), approximately 12 to 15 "119" reports concerning Oswald (OPNAV Forms 5520119 are ONI's equivalent of an FBI FD302 investigative report), crossed his desk. Reeves said he was aware of "119" reports from Japan and Texas, and that the primary concern of the reports he read on

Oswald was to ascertain what damage had been done to national security by Oswald's defection. Reeves reported that he also saw eight to ten "119" reports on Oswald after the assassination, and that he was confident he was not confusing the two events in his mind.

In the spring of 1998, Review Board staff members met with two Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) records management officials, one of whom personally verified that he had searched for District Intelligence Office records (with negative results) from the San Diego, Dallas, and New Orleans District Intelligence Offices in 1996 with negative results. This search included "119" reports from the time period 19591964, during an extensive search of NCIS

record group 181. The search included any records that would have been related to Oswald's defection. Thus, the Review Board ultimately located no documentary evidence to substantiate Reeves' claims.

FOOTNOTES

(3) In Volume 11 of its report, the HSCA attempted to deal with allegations of a possible military investigation of Oswald by the Marine Corps following the assassination. Also, some former USMC associates of Oswald have told researchers that they recall civilian investigators asking questions about Oswald following his defection in late 1959 or early 1960.

(4) The in-person, unsworn interview was tape-recorded, and the three written interview reports are dated August 5, August 13, and September 16, 1997, respectively.

(5) Reeves served in the District Intelligence Office of the San Diego, California 11th Naval District.

(6) One of the officers who called Mr. Reeves was Rufus Taylor, who was Director of Naval Intelligence in 1964.

(END QUOTE)

There is an annual award within the intelligence community entitled the "Admiral Rufus B. Taylor Award," given by the "National Military Intelligence Association" for the recipient being an outstanding Naval Intelligence career professional.

First-generation researcher MAE BRUSSELL mentioned TAYLOR....

(QUOTE)

When Richard Helms, former CIA chief, was questioned about Oswald's Navy Intelligence work, he said, "Why ask me? Call Navy Intelligence."And he threw out the name Rufus Taylor. And he mentioned that Taylor just died last week. He was a very important witness who died a week before Helms was to testify. Rufus

Taylor, Annapolis graduate, studied in Japan from 1938 to 1941, was a native of St. Louise, Missouri, and was with General  Macarthur after the war in Japan. Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence for the entire Pacific fleet, he was

in Japan from 1941 to 1959 and in Navy Intelligence at the time that Lee Oswald was over there in 1959 in the Philippines, at the Atsugi Air bases and was involved with the U2. Oswald served in the Marines with top secret security clearance at the time that Rufus was Pacific Intelligence Chief. Oswald went to the Soviet Union and Rufus went to Washington, D.C. Oswald said, "I'm going to give away radar secrets." Rufus then became the Director for Foreign Intelligence in the Soviet Union. Rufus was the Director of Navy Intelligence in 1963 up until the time Kennedy was killed - from 1963 to 1966. During 1967 through 1969, Rufus became the Deputy Director of the CIA--the number two post under Helms. These were the years that Permindex and the international cartels were working along with the Solidarists--the White Russian communities-- the Syndicate, gaming interests, the FBI and the Pentagon (Division 5, FBI) which were described into the Torbitt Document as being behind all these assassinations. The fact that Rufus was not called until he was dead is baiting the issue a little too much. These murders are concealed, not for the shame or disgrace of what transpired, but because of the future plans that would be spoiled.

(END QUOTE)

TAYLOR was one of many lifelong military professionals who maintained (and so documented when he wrote it to HELMS) that the 07JUN67, murderous 25-minute act-of-war attack by Israel on the U.S.S. Liberty ship was a deliberate attack (inflicting 34 dead and 172 wounded American servicemen from a crew of 294), and that the U.S. government covered-up, and continues to cover-up, that fact. (Due to continuing pressure by the pro-Israel lobby within the United States, this attack remains the only serious naval incident that has never been thoroughly investigated by Congress; to this day, no surviving crewmember has been permitted to officially and publicly testify about the attack)

Don Roberdeau

U.S.S. John F. Kennedy, CV-67, "Big John" Plank Walker

Sooner, or later, the Truth emerges Clearly

http://members.aol.com/DRoberdeau/JFK/DP.jpg

http://members.aol.com/DRoberdeau/JFK/ROSE...NOUNCEMENT.html

http://members.aol.com/DRoberdeau/JFK/BOND...PINGarnold.html

http://members.aol.com/DRoberdeau/JFK/GHOS...update2001.html

T ogether

E veryone

A chieves

M ore

TEAMWORK.gif

DHS3elevatedYELLOW.gif

At an early meeting of the Warren Commission, the transcript of which was marked "Top Secret" until 1975, the members discussed what Chief Counsel F. Lee Rankin called "this dirty rumor" that Oswald may have been an FBI informant.

"This is a terribly hard thing to disprove, you know," said Allen Dulles. "How do you disprove a fellow was not your agent? How do you disprove it?"

The late Congressman from Louisiana, Hale Boggs, then asked" "You could disprove it, couldn't you?"

"No," said Dulles.

"Did you have agents about whom you had no record whatsoever?" asked Boggs.

"The records might not be on paper," said Dulles.

Boggs than asked about an agent who did not have a contract but was recruited by someone from the CIA. "The man who recruited him would know, wouldn't he?" asked Boggs.

"Yes, but he wouldn't tell," said Dulles.

Commission Chairman Earl Warren appeared a bit taken aback by that. "wouldn't tell it under oath?" asked Warren.

"I wouldn't think he would tell it under oath, no," answered Dulles.

It was a revealing admission of a loyal CIA officer's perspective. It was the same perspective held by former CIA Director Richard Helms when he called his conviction of perjury before Congress a "badge of honor."

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Great thread.

Rufus Taylor moves from the MacArthur office in Japan (where Alaxander Haig learned his Imperial manner) then into Pacific Naval Intelligence, ONI and DDI under Helms....

This of course ties in with my theory, as both John F. Kennedy and Lee Harvey Oswald had Naval security clearances first and foremost. When we talk about the lapse in security based on Oswald's defection and counter-defection, we are talking about ONI and Rufus Taylor. If ONI was spying on JFK, or accessing NSA material on JFK, Rufus Taylor would have been the man to bring "incapacity and loss of clearance" findings to JCS chief Maxwell Taylor, CD Dillon and LB Johnson.

The ONI supplied the patsy, the low level "burn card" and public Communist Lee Harvey Oswald, who was served up for public consumption, and guaranteed to stymie any thorough investigation (on National Security grounds). The Naval records and subsequent files on Kennedy (and Oswald) would have been the primary responsibility of Rufus Taylor, who, like NSA/DDI Marshall Carter, was elevated (rather than fired) in the aftermath of Dallas to a top position in the CIA.

A joint agency operation involving Maxwell Taylor, Rufus Taylor of ONI, C.D. Dillon, J. Edgar Hoover and Lyndon Johnson would appear to tie up quite a few loose ends concerning JFK, Oswald and the cover-up....

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  • 6 years later...

Good Day Tim.... Thank You. Very interesting, indeed.

According to the ONI history info available here....

http://www.fas.org/i...oni/history.htm

.... Vice-Admiral RUFUS L. TAYLOR was the first Intelligence Specialist to hold the position of Director of Naval Intelligence, and was so appointed sometime in 1963. (anyone have the date?)

The ARRB requested that the Navy and its Office of Naval Intelligence search for the records of Director of TAYLOR. The ARRB Review Board had acquired a copy of an unsigned September 21, 1964, affidavit regarding OSWALD that TAYLOR appears to have executed and forwarded to the Secretary of Defense McNAMARA. The affidavit states that that ONI never utilized Lee Harvey Oswald as an agent or an informant. As far as I know, the ONI did not locate any files belonging to TAYLOR.

Also from the ARRB final report, chapter 6, "The Quest for Additional Information and Records in Federal Government Offices"....

(QUOTE)

The question of whether the Marine Corps conducted a post-assassination investigation and produced a written report on former Marine Private Lee Harvey Oswald, circa late 1963 and early 1964, has never been resolved to the satisfaction of the public. Similarly, many have wondered whether the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) conducted a post-defection "net damage assessment" investigation of Lee Harvey Oswald circa 1959 or 1960. Various former Oswald associates and military investigators have recalled separate investigations. (3) Researchers have also questioned whether Oswald was an "authentic" defector, a "false defector" in a program run by an agency of the U.S. government, or a false defector sent on a mission to the U.S.S.R. for a particular purpose and then used for different purposes by some members of the

intelligence community following his return to the United States.

a. U.S. Marine Corps records.

The Review Board asked the Marine Corps to search for any records relating to

post-assassination investigations that the U.S. Marine Corps might have completed, as some researchers believe. The U.S. Marine Corps searched files at both U.S. Marine Corps HQ in Quantico, and at the Federal Records Center in Suitland, Maryland, but the Marine Corps did not locate evidence of any internal investigations of Lee Harvey Oswald, other than correspondence already published in the Warren Report.

i. U.S. Marine Headquarters copy of enlisted personnel file and medical file. In

1997, the Review Board transferred to the JFK Collection at NARA the original

(paper) copies of Lee Harvey Oswald's U.S. Marine Corps Enlisted Personnel

File, and Medical Treatment File. Previously, these files had been maintained

at U.S. Marine Corps Headquarters in Quantico, Virginia and had only been

available in microfiche format in response to Freedom of Information Act

(FOIA) requests that people made to the Marine Corps.

ii. Additional relevant U.S. Marine Corps unit diaries. The Review Board

obtained from U.S. Marine Corps Headquarters at Quantico, Virginia,

additional official U.S. Marine Corps unit diaries from the units in which

Oswald served. These additional diaries complement the partial collection of

unit diaries gathered by the HSCA. Together, the Review Board and HSCA

unit diary records appear to constitute a complete unit diary record for

Oswald. Researchers can compare the in and out transfer dates in Oswald's

personnel file with the original entries in the pertinent diaries to which they

correspond.

b. Military identification card.

To resolve questions about whether Oswald's DD1173 Military Identification card provided some indication that Oswald had a connection to CIA, the Review Board requested and received additional information from the Federal Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri, from the personnel files of other Marines who had served with Oswald (for comparison purposes), and from the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Army's Military History Institute.

c. Possible ONI post-defection investigation.

The Review Board became aware of an individual named Fred Reeves of California, who was reputed to have been in charge of a post-defection "net damage assessment" of Oswald by the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) shortly after Oswald's defection to the U.S.S.R. The Review Board contacted Reeves, interviewed him twice by telephone, then flew him to Washington, D.C., where the Review Board staff interviewed him in person. (4)

In 1959, Reeves was a civilian Naval Intelligence Operations Specialist. (5) Reeves told the Review Board that a week or so after Oswald defected to the U.S.S.R., two officers from ONI in Washington, D.C., (6) called him and asked him to conduct a background investigation at the Marine Corps Air Station in El Toro, CaliforniaOswald's last duty station before his discharge from the Marine Corps. Reeves said that he went to El Toro, copied Oswald's enlisted personnel file, obtained the names of many of his associates, and mailed this information to ONI in Washington, D.C. He said that ONI in Washington ran the post-defection investigation of Oswald, and that the Washington officers then directed various agents in the field. Although Reeves did not interview anyone himself, he said that later (circa late 1959 or early 1960), approximately 12 to 15 "119" reports concerning Oswald (OPNAV Forms 5520119 are ONI's equivalent of an FBI FD302 investigative report), crossed his desk. Reeves said he was aware of "119" reports from Japan and Texas, and that the primary concern of the reports he read on

Oswald was to ascertain what damage had been done to national security by Oswald's defection. Reeves reported that he also saw eight to ten "119" reports on Oswald after the assassination, and that he was confident he was not confusing the two events in his mind.

In the spring of 1998, Review Board staff members met with two Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) records management officials, one of whom personally verified that he had searched for District Intelligence Office records (with negative results) from the San Diego, Dallas, and New Orleans District Intelligence Offices in 1996 with negative results. This search included "119" reports from the time period 19591964, during an extensive search of NCIS

record group 181. The search included any records that would have been related to Oswald's defection. Thus, the Review Board ultimately located no documentary evidence to substantiate Reeves' claims.

FOOTNOTES

(3) In Volume 11 of its report, the HSCA attempted to deal with allegations of a possible military investigation of Oswald by the Marine Corps following the assassination. Also, some former USMC associates of Oswald have told researchers that they recall civilian investigators asking questions about Oswald following his defection in late 1959 or early 1960.

(4) The in-person, unsworn interview was tape-recorded, and the three written interview reports are dated August 5, August 13, and September 16, 1997, respectively.

(5) Reeves served in the District Intelligence Office of the San Diego, California 11th Naval District.

(6) One of the officers who called Mr. Reeves was Rufus Taylor, who was Director of Naval Intelligence in 1964.

(END QUOTE)

There is an annual award within the intelligence community entitled the "Admiral Rufus B. Taylor Award," given by the "National Military Intelligence Association" for the recipient being an outstanding Naval Intelligence career professional.

First-generation researcher MAE BRUSSELL mentioned TAYLOR....

(QUOTE)

When Richard Helms, former CIA chief, was questioned about Oswald's Navy Intelligence work, he said, "Why ask me? Call Navy Intelligence."And he threw out the name Rufus Taylor. And he mentioned that Taylor just died last week. He was a very important witness who died a week before Helms was to testify. Rufus

Taylor, Annapolis graduate, studied in Japan from 1938 to 1941, was a native of St. Louise, Missouri, and was with General  Macarthur after the war in Japan. Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence for the entire Pacific fleet, he was

in Japan from 1941 to 1959 and in Navy Intelligence at the time that Lee Oswald was over there in 1959 in the Philippines, at the Atsugi Air bases and was involved with the U2. Oswald served in the Marines with top secret security clearance at the time that Rufus was Pacific Intelligence Chief. Oswald went to the Soviet Union and Rufus went to Washington, D.C. Oswald said, "I'm going to give away radar secrets." Rufus then became the Director for Foreign Intelligence in the Soviet Union. Rufus was the Director of Navy Intelligence in 1963 up until the time Kennedy was killed - from 1963 to 1966. During 1967 through 1969, Rufus became the Deputy Director of the CIA--the number two post under Helms. These were the years that Permindex and the international cartels were working along with the Solidarists--the White Russian communities-- the Syndicate, gaming interests, the FBI and the Pentagon (Division 5, FBI) which were described into the Torbitt Document as being behind all these assassinations. The fact that Rufus was not called until he was dead is baiting the issue a little too much. These murders are concealed, not for the shame or disgrace of what transpired, but because of the future plans that would be spoiled.

(END QUOTE)

TAYLOR was one of many lifelong military professionals who maintained (and so documented when he wrote it to HELMS) that the 07JUN67, murderous 25-minute act-of-war attack by Israel on the U.S.S. Liberty ship was a deliberate attack (inflicting 34 dead and 172 wounded American servicemen from a crew of 294), and that the U.S. government covered-up, and continues to cover-up, that fact. (Due to continuing pressure by the pro-Israel lobby within the United States, this attack remains the only serious naval incident that has never been thoroughly investigated by Congress; to this day, no surviving crewmember has been permitted to officially and publicly testify about the attack)

Don Roberdeau

U.S.S. John F. Kennedy, CV-67, "Big John" Plank Walker

Sooner, or later, the Truth emerges Clearly

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T ogether

E veryone

A chieves

M ore

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At an early meeting of the Warren Commission, the transcript of which was marked "Top Secret" until 1975, the members discussed what Chief Counsel F. Lee Rankin called "this dirty rumor" that Oswald may have been an FBI informant.

"This is a terribly hard thing to disprove, you know," said Allen Dulles. "How do you disprove a fellow was not your agent? How do you disprove it?"

The late Congressman from Louisiana, Hale Boggs, then asked" "You could disprove it, couldn't you?"

"No," said Dulles.

"Did you have agents about whom you had no record whatsoever?" asked Boggs.

"The records might not be on paper," said Dulles.

Boggs than asked about an agent who did not have a contract but was recruited by someone from the CIA. "The man who recruited him would know, wouldn't he?" asked Boggs.

"Yes, but he wouldn't tell," said Dulles.

Commission Chairman Earl Warren appeared a bit taken aback by that. "wouldn't tell it under oath?" asked Warren.

"I wouldn't think he would tell it under oath, no," answered Dulles.

It was a revealing admission of a loyal CIA officer's perspective. It was the same perspective held by former CIA Director Richard Helms when he called his conviction of perjury before Congress a "badge of honor."

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