Jump to content
The Education Forum

Robert Crowley


Recommended Posts

It's hard to say with regard to these files. I assume this is where holocaust deniers get their beliefs from. The name of Mary Ferell on the CIA contacts list is very puzzling as she has to my knowledge always been held in the highest of esteem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the list of CIA contacts are Howard Hunt and David Hunt, is this Howard's son? I know one of his sons is called David but is this him?

Hunt, David

3503 Fulton St., NW, Washington, DC 20007

Hunt. E. Howard

1401 B St., NW, Washington, DC 20005

If so he might be worth contacting, if Hunts childrens response to the Kennedy affair written about in Mark Lane's Plausible Denial are anything to go by.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can someone cite evidence that Crowley was ever "Deputy Director of Clandestine Operations"? I mean evidence outside of the hoax book Regicide.

I remember doing a web search on Crowley, and never found anything other than a reference to him as an employee of the CIA in public relations. If that was his job, I imagine that Public Relations was far down the hall from Clandestine Ops.

Ron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can someone cite evidence that Crowley was ever "Deputy Director of Clandestine Operations"? I mean evidence outside of the hoax book Regicide.

I remember doing a web search on Crowley, and never found anything other than a reference to him as an employee of the CIA in public relations. If that was his job, I imagine that Public Relations was far down the hall from Clandestine Ops.

Robert Crowley definitely existed but it appears he was only a fairly minor figure in the CIA (he was a officer in Domestic Ops). He also suffered from senile dementia in the years before his death in 2000. That does not stop Joe Trento for The Secret History of the CIA making great use of his information. It is also probably significant that it was James Angleton who put Crowley in touch with Trento.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert Crowley definitely existed but it appears he was only a fairly minor figure in the CIA (he was a officer in Domestic Ops). He also suffered from senile dementia in the years  before his death in 2000. That does not stop Joe Trento for The Secret History of the CIA making great use of his information. It is also probably significant that it was James Angleton who put Crowley in touch with Trento.

John,

I have not read Trento's book. However, I dug out my copy of Regicide by "Gregory Douglas," and find that the author thanks Trento in his acknowledgements for "his valuable commentary and excellent advice." If Trento helped Douglas put his book together, I don't think that reflects well on the credibility of Trento's own work. It's possible, though, that Trento never met Douglas and the latter is simply saying that Trento wrote a good book that he found useful.

I gather from what you say that Crowley provided valuable information to Trento for his book. That is the same claim that Douglas makes about Crowley and himself in Regicide.

Douglas quotes a Washington Post obituary from October 20, 2000, which states that Crowley "became assistant deputy director for operations, the second in command in the clandestine directorate of operations." I have no way of finding the Post obituary other than Douglas's quoting of it.

Ron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trento thinks that Gregory Douglas is a fraud and had nothing to do with his book.

Robert Crowley definitely existed but it appears he was only a fairly minor figure in the CIA (he was a officer in Domestic Ops). He also suffered from senile dementia in the years  before his death in 2000. That does not stop Joe Trento for The Secret History of the CIA making great use of his information. It is also probably significant that it was James Angleton who put Crowley in touch with Trento.

John,

I have not read Trento's book. However, I dug out my copy of Regicide by "Gregory Douglas," and find that the author thanks Trento in his acknowledgements for "his valuable commentary and excellent advice." If Trento helped Douglas put his book together, I don't think that reflects well on the credibility of Trento's own work. It's possible, though, that Trento never met Douglas and the latter is simply saying that Trento wrote a good book that he found useful.

I gather from what you say that Crowley provided valuable information to Trento for his book. That is the same claim that Douglas makes about Crowley and himself in Regicide.

Douglas quotes a Washington Post obituary from October 20, 2000, which states that Crowley "became assistant deputy director for operations, the second in command in the clandestine directorate of operations." I have no way of finding the Post obituary other than Douglas's quoting of it.

Ron

Edited by Gary Buell
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...