Jump to content
The Education Forum

Lee Harvey Oswald


Recommended Posts

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father. Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family. However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers. This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 62
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Of greater interest, as well as sociological impact, is the occupation of and control over the populace of New Orleans by Federal Troops.

New Orleans was of course forced to surrender with virtually no physical damage to the city. There are several reasons, of which one is the fact that New Orleans was the financial center of the South with it's own Stock Exchange which had close and direct connections to the New York City and other Exchanges.

Nevertheless, this "occupation" by Northern Troops left a bitterness in the populace of New Orleans which few could understand.

As example, in the battle of Vicksburg, MS, Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, 1863.

Thereafter, the City of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate the 4th of July as any form of holiday.

This continued until after WWII.

So, from 1863 until 1945, a total of 82 years, a grudge was held in which the people of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate Independence day of the Union.

Many of those Confederate Forces at Vicksburg who lost their lives were also from Louisiana.

And while they lost their life, those of great wealth in New Orleans, lost much of their wealth and prestige due to the loss of the war and occupation by Federal Forces.

Tom

P.S. P.G.T. Beauregard, Confederate hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, made his home at New Orleans.

And, after the end of the war, many of those Generals from the Confederacy settled here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Of greater interest, as well as sociological impact, is the occupation of and control over the populace of New Orleans by Federal Troops.

New Orleans was of course forced to surrender with virtually no physical damage to the city. There are several reasons, of which one is the fact that New Orleans was the financial center of the South with it's own Stock Exchange which had close and direct connections to the New York City and other Exchanges.

Nevertheless, this "occupation" by Northern Troops left a bitterness in the populace of New Orleans which few could understand.

As example, in the battle of Vicksburg, MS, Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, 1863.

Thereafter, the City of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate the 4th of July as any form of holiday.

This continued until after WWII.

So, from 1863 until 1945, a total of 82 years, a grudge was held in which the people of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate Independence day of the Union.

Many of those Confederate Forces at Vicksburg who lost their lives were also from Louisiana.

And while they lost their life, those of great wealth in New Orleans, lost much of their wealth and prestige due to the loss of the war and occupation by Federal Forces.

Tom

P.S. P.G.T. Beauregard, Confederate hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, made his home at New Orleans.

And, after the end of the war, many of those Generals from the Confederacy settled here.

Frequently, in order to attempt to get those who are truely interested in research to do so, I have asked LHO related "trivia" questions.

In the event anyone has not found this prior, it is sometimes worthwhile.

So: Anyone know the connection(s) between LHO & P.G.T. Beauregard?

___________________________________________________________________

On December 6, 1889, Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, died at the New Orleans, LA home of Judge Charles E. Fenner.

Thus beginning another chain of events in history which ultimately resulted in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States of America.

Judge Charles E. Fenner:

a. Son of a Confederate Officer/Doctor.

b. Founder of "Fenner's Battery" of the Louisiana Artillery/Confederate Officer himself.

c. Later associated with the "Washington Artillery" of New Orleans.

d. Father of Charles E. Fenner of the brokerage firm of "Pierce, Fenner, &

Beane" which later joined with the brokerage firm of Merrill Lynch.

e. Member of the Board of Trustees of Tulane University, along with a host of

other former Confederate veterans.

f. Grandfather of Darwin S. Fenner who defended Tulane University against

Federal mandated integration.

g. Partner in a New Orleans law firm with William Wirt Howe

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a sideline note to this history, few are aware of the probability that Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, was at one time quite probably in what is now considered to be Dealy Plaza.

Beginning in 1853-1854, a Frenchman by the name of Maxime Guillot, purchased various lots in the area of what we now consider to be Dealy Plaza.

Guillot, a native of France, had come to Dallas by way of New Orleans, LA, and those familiar with the New Orleans area are quite familiar with this french name, and Mr. Guillot actually spent approximately 3 years in New Orleans prior to his final move to the Dallas area in 1852.

Ultimately, Mr. Guillot acquired that area which covers a portion of where the TSDB now stands.

In this area, Mr. Guillot had boarding houses as well as a wagon shop/factory which stood closeby to where the TSDB now stands.

Mr. Guillot later became the Superintendent of a wagon manufacturing plant for the Confederate States of America and was in charge of construction of wagons for the Confederacy.

In 1869, Mr. Guillot constructed what was considered to be the first concrete house in Dallas. This house was located on the corner of Live Oak and Harwood Streets.

In 1894, that area which encompasses the TSDB was sold by Mary Mullen Guillot to the Rock Island Plow Company.

This area would ultimately be where the TSDB now stands.

In 1873, Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, paid a visit to Dallas, TX.

During this visit, Jefferson Davis stayed in the concrete home located at the corner of Live Oak and Harwood Streets which had been constructed by the French Wagonmaster of the Confederate States of America.

If recalled correctly, it is only 10 or so blocks from the former home of Maxime Guillote, in which Jefferson Davis stayed during his 1873 visit, to what now is Dealy Plaza and the TSDB.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Of greater interest, as well as sociological impact, is the occupation of and control over the populace of New Orleans by Federal Troops.

New Orleans was of course forced to surrender with virtually no physical damage to the city. There are several reasons, of which one is the fact that New Orleans was the financial center of the South with it's own Stock Exchange which had close and direct connections to the New York City and other Exchanges.

Nevertheless, this "occupation" by Northern Troops left a bitterness in the populace of New Orleans which few could understand.

As example, in the battle of Vicksburg, MS, Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, 1863.

Thereafter, the City of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate the 4th of July as any form of holiday.

This continued until after WWII.

So, from 1863 until 1945, a total of 82 years, a grudge was held in which the people of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate Independence day of the Union.

Many of those Confederate Forces at Vicksburg who lost their lives were also from Louisiana.

And while they lost their life, those of great wealth in New Orleans, lost much of their wealth and prestige due to the loss of the war and occupation by Federal Forces.

Tom

P.S. P.G.T. Beauregard, Confederate hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, made his home at New Orleans.

And, after the end of the war, many of those Generals from the Confederacy settled here.

Frequently, in order to attempt to get those who are truely interested in research to do so, I have asked LHO related "trivia" questions.

In the event anyone has not found this prior, it is sometimes worthwhile.

So: Anyone know the connection(s) between LHO & P.G.T. Beauregard?

___________________________________________________________________

And the answer is: They were distant cousins! (there are other answers as well)

#1:

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard of the Beauregard Plantation in St. Bernard Parish Louisiana was considered to be a hero of the Confederate Cause.

Former Superintendent of West Point, PGT Beauregard resigned his commission in the U.S. Military to become a General in the Confederate Army.

As such, he was sent to Ft. Sumpter, SC and is considered as the hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, SC which was the first shots fired in the Civil War.

As any good researcher should know, the maiden name of LHO's mother was Claverie.

Marguerite Claverie was of primary french descent, just as was the Beauregard family.

Marguerite's Aunt, Marie (Belle) Clavarie, married Joseph Toutant Beauregard, a distant cousin to General PGT Beauregard.

Joseph Toutant Beauregard and Belle (Claverie) Beauregard had one child, a son,

Paul Toutant G. Beauregard, born February 20, 1925. died June 7, 1999.

This PGT Beauregard was a second cousin to Lee Harvey Oswald

#2. In addition to this Aunt of Marguerite Claverie who married into the Beauregard family, and thereafter named a son after the famous Confederate General, there are other connections between the Claverie's and the General PGT Beauregard family.

____________________________________________________________________

On December 6, 1889, Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, died at the New Orleans, LA home of Judge Charles E. Fenner.

Thus beginning another chain of events in history which ultimately resulted in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States of America.

Judge Charles E. Fenner:

a. Son of a Confederate Officer/Doctor.

b. Founder of "Fenner's Battery" of the Louisiana Artillery/Confederate Officer himself.

c. Later associated with the "Washington Artillery" of New Orleans.

d. Father of Charles E. Fenner of the brokerage firm of "Pierce, Fenner, &

Beane" which later joined with the brokerage firm of Merrill Lynch.

e. Member of the Board of Trustees of Tulane University, along with a host of

other former Confederate veterans.

f. Grandfather of Darwin S. Fenner who defended Tulane University against

Federal mandated integration.

g. Partner in a New Orleans law firm with William Wirt Howe

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

____________________________________________________________________

General John Bell Hood:

http://www.johnbellhood.org/bio-05.htm

____________________________________________________________________

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

___________________________________________________________________

William Oswald, Great Grandfather of LHO was a German Electrical Engineer who lived in Covington, LA.*

William Oswald worked for the Edison Electric Company and was in part responsible for electrifying the 1884/1885 New Orleans Cotton Exposition.

It is stated that William Oswald knew Thomas Edison personally, and when Edison Electric Company secured the rights to provide electricity to New Orleans that Oswald went to work for Edison.

Edison Electric also began to provide power for the New Orleans (electric) StreetCar system.**

During WWI, the Covington, LA estate of William Oswald was burned by anti-German citizens.

*Those familiar with the family also know that the third marriage of Marguerite (Claverie/Oswald) was to an electrical engineer named Ekdahl.

Marguerite Claverie Oswald/Ekdahl at one point lived in Covington, LA, and on occassion visited there.

**Those familiar with the family also know that the father of Marguerite Claverie, (John Claverie) was a streetcar conductor in New Orleans for approximately 30 years.

http://www.tulane.edu/~1miller/WWI.htm

http://nutrias.org/~nopl/guides/foc/cabildob.htm

(Mrs. Samuel Renee Bear)

http://www.bestofneworleans.com/dispatch/2...07-12/blake.php

____________________________________________________________________

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Of greater interest, as well as sociological impact, is the occupation of and control over the populace of New Orleans by Federal Troops.

New Orleans was of course forced to surrender with virtually no physical damage to the city. There are several reasons, of which one is the fact that New Orleans was the financial center of the South with it's own Stock Exchange which had close and direct connections to the New York City and other Exchanges.

Nevertheless, this "occupation" by Northern Troops left a bitterness in the populace of New Orleans which few could understand.

As example, in the battle of Vicksburg, MS, Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, 1863.

Thereafter, the City of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate the 4th of July as any form of holiday.

This continued until after WWII.

So, from 1863 until 1945, a total of 82 years, a grudge was held in which the people of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate Independence day of the Union.

Many of those Confederate Forces at Vicksburg who lost their lives were also from Louisiana.

And while they lost their life, those of great wealth in New Orleans, lost much of their wealth and prestige due to the loss of the war and occupation by Federal Forces.

Tom

P.S. P.G.T. Beauregard, Confederate hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, made his home at New Orleans.

And, after the end of the war, many of those Generals from the Confederacy settled here.

Frequently, in order to attempt to get those who are truely interested in research to do so, I have asked LHO related "trivia" questions.

In the event anyone has not found this prior, it is sometimes worthwhile.

So: Anyone know the connection(s) between LHO & P.G.T. Beauregard?

___________________________________________________________________

On December 6, 1889, Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, died at the New Orleans, LA home of Judge Charles E. Fenner.

Thus beginning another chain of events in history which ultimately resulted in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States of America.

Judge Charles E. Fenner:

a. Son of a Confederate Officer/Doctor.

b. Founder of "Fenner's Battery" of the Louisiana Artillery/Confederate Officer himself.

c. Later associated with the "Washington Artillery" of New Orleans.

d. Father of Charles E. Fenner of the brokerage firm of "Pierce, Fenner, &

Beane" which later joined with the brokerage firm of Merrill Lynch.

e. Member of the Board of Trustees of Tulane University, along with a host of

other former Confederate veterans.

f. Grandfather of Darwin S. Fenner who defended Tulane University against

Federal mandated integration.

g. Partner in a New Orleans law firm with William Wirt Howe

___________________________________________________________________

In the late 1890's, Mrs. Clarisse Fenner Pendleton, of New Orleans, LA, purchased the Jefferson Davis plantation "Rosemont".

Thereafter, she maintained the plantation/home for a few years before placing it into the hands of a very old and prominent Mississippi and Louisiana family.

http:/www.rosemontplantation.com/history.htm

____________________________________________________________________

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Of greater interest, as well as sociological impact, is the occupation of and control over the populace of New Orleans by Federal Troops.

New Orleans was of course forced to surrender with virtually no physical damage to the city. There are several reasons, of which one is the fact that New Orleans was the financial center of the South with it's own Stock Exchange which had close and direct connections to the New York City and other Exchanges.

Nevertheless, this "occupation" by Northern Troops left a bitterness in the populace of New Orleans which few could understand.

As example, in the battle of Vicksburg, MS, Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, 1863.

Thereafter, the City of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate the 4th of July as any form of holiday.

This continued until after WWII.

So, from 1863 until 1945, a total of 82 years, a grudge was held in which the people of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate Independence day of the Union.

Many of those Confederate Forces at Vicksburg who lost their lives were also from Louisiana.

And while they lost their life, those of great wealth in New Orleans, lost much of their wealth and prestige due to the loss of the war and occupation by Federal Forces.

Tom

P.S. P.G.T. Beauregard, Confederate hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, made his home at New Orleans.

And, after the end of the war, many of those Generals from the Confederacy settled here.

Frequently, in order to attempt to get those who are truely interested in research to do so, I have asked LHO related "trivia" questions.

In the event anyone has not found this prior, it is sometimes worthwhile.

So: Anyone know the connection(s) between LHO & P.G.T. Beauregard?

___________________________________________________________________

On December 6, 1889, Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, died at the New Orleans, LA home of Judge Charles E. Fenner.

Thus beginning another chain of events in history which ultimately resulted in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States of America.

Judge Charles E. Fenner:

a. Son of a Confederate Officer/Doctor.

b. Founder of "Fenner's Battery" of the Louisiana Artillery/Confederate Officer himself.

c. Later associated with the "Washington Artillery" of New Orleans.

d. Father of Charles E. Fenner of the brokerage firm of "Pierce, Fenner, &

Beane" which later joined with the brokerage firm of Merrill Lynch.

e. Member of the Board of Trustees of Tulane University, along with a host of

other former Confederate veterans.

f. Grandfather of Darwin S. Fenner who defended Tulane University against

Federal mandated integration.

g. Partner in a New Orleans law firm with William Wirt Howe

___________________________________________________________________

In the late 1890's, Mrs. Clarisse Fenner Pendleton, of New Orleans, LA, purchased the Jefferson Davis plantation "Rosemont".

Thereafter, she maintained the plantation/home for a few years before placing it into the hands of a very old and prominent Mississippi and Louisiana family.

http:/www.rosemontplantation.com/history.htm

____________________________________________________________________

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

____________________________________________________________________

http://www.researchonline.net/lacw/index/index/35.htm

Here is a portion of the Claverie listing. There are more in other such listings as well.

This listing does not show the "Oswald's", however it is worth keeping for other reference.

Other listings are more comprehensive and complete.

____________________________________________________________________

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Of greater interest, as well as sociological impact, is the occupation of and control over the populace of New Orleans by Federal Troops.

New Orleans was of course forced to surrender with virtually no physical damage to the city. There are several reasons, of which one is the fact that New Orleans was the financial center of the South with it's own Stock Exchange which had close and direct connections to the New York City and other Exchanges.

Nevertheless, this "occupation" by Northern Troops left a bitterness in the populace of New Orleans which few could understand.

As example, in the battle of Vicksburg, MS, Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, 1863.

Thereafter, the City of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate the 4th of July as any form of holiday.

This continued until after WWII.

So, from 1863 until 1945, a total of 82 years, a grudge was held in which the people of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate Independence day of the Union.

Many of those Confederate Forces at Vicksburg who lost their lives were also from Louisiana.

And while they lost their life, those of great wealth in New Orleans, lost much of their wealth and prestige due to the loss of the war and occupation by Federal Forces.

Tom

P.S. P.G.T. Beauregard, Confederate hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, made his home at New Orleans.

And, after the end of the war, many of those Generals from the Confederacy settled here.

Frequently, in order to attempt to get those who are truely interested in research to do so, I have asked LHO related "trivia" questions.

In the event anyone has not found this prior, it is sometimes worthwhile.

So: Anyone know the connection(s) between LHO & P.G.T. Beauregard?

___________________________________________________________________

On December 6, 1889, Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, died at the New Orleans, LA home of Judge Charles E. Fenner.

Thus beginning another chain of events in history which ultimately resulted in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States of America.

Judge Charles E. Fenner:

a. Son of a Confederate Officer/Doctor.

b. Founder of "Fenner's Battery" of the Louisiana Artillery/Confederate Officer himself.

c. Later associated with the "Washington Artillery" of New Orleans.

d. Father of Charles E. Fenner of the brokerage firm of "Pierce, Fenner, &

Beane" which later joined with the brokerage firm of Merrill Lynch.

e. Member of the Board of Trustees of Tulane University, along with a host of

other former Confederate veterans.

f. Grandfather of Darwin S. Fenner who defended Tulane University against

Federal mandated integration.

g. Partner in a New Orleans law firm with William Wirt Howe

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In January 1963, Joseph Merrick Jones, President of the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund, announced that black students would be admitted into Tulane University beginning in February, 1963.

Joseph Merrick Jones was of the wealth and upper class of New Orleans Society, and had supported the integration of Tulane.

On March 11, 1963, Joseph Merrick Jones and his wife were killed in a fire that completely burned their surburban home in Metarie, LA.

The cause of he fire was never determined.

Historical Note: http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/guillory3_box.htm

Shedding Light on Tulane History:

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/history_05a.htm

Desegregation and the "Ruling Class" in New Orleans

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/rulingclass_box.htm

Obscuring Tulane's Confederate Past

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/1834_box.htm

Administrators of the University of Louisiana

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/laboard_box.htm

A search and review for the administrators for Tulane University and their background histories will also reveal the Confederate heritage of Tulane.

____________________________________________________________________

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those who are not "of the South", and especially of the New Orleans, LA SOUTH, it is understandable why they have followed the many misleading statements as regards LHO and his background.

To those of us who are of the South, there is little difficulty in resolving exactly who and what LHO was, as well as who was responsiblie for much of his life.

First, the name:

Confederate General John Bell Hood, hero of Texas and the Confederacy, named one of his sons "Oswald Harvey Hood".

Later history (after 1963) has told us that this is incorrect and that the name of the son was "Oswald Harney Hood".

This "corrected" name came about only after LHO had assassinated JFK.

Nevertheless, at the time that LHO was born, history recorded the son of General John Bell Hood as being Oswald Harvey Hood.

The name "Oswald" came about as a result of "Oswald's Brigade" which was a German Brigade from Texas which served under General Hood during the Civil War.

Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald obtained the name "Lee", from his father.  Robert E. Lee Oswald, who thereafter named his first son (LHO's brother) Robert E. Lee Oswald as well.

And, the name "Harvey" is also a family name on the Oswald side of the family.

For those who have not been to New Orleans, LA and studied the history of this area, it is well worth the learning exercise.

A visit to "Lee Circle" in New Orleans for a Southerner is almost like a trip to Mecca for those of the Muslim faith.

Thereafer, to visit the Confederate Memorial where Jefferson Davis lay in state after having been exhumed from a New Orleans Cemetary for later reburial at Richmond, is somewhat revered as would be a trip to Rome and the Holy Cathedral.

This is the atmosphere in which LHO grew up.

LHO's mother, Marguerite Claverie, came from what was considered to be an upper class Cajun family.  However, due to various reasons, Marguerite's family remained quite poor.

A true understanding of exactly who and what LHO was can be understood only in understanding the south, and specifically New Orleans, LA.

And, this understanding can come about only as a result of understanding the area, it's history, and it's people and their family associations.

In this regard, one should begin their search in the listing of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers.  This search should begin with the names Claverie and Oswald for the immediate time being.

However, this is only the beginning of the search for the real LHO.

Tom

Tom, this is good , I had noticed his brothers name and speculated on its roots, the info on Oswald's brigade is new to me. I agree that an understanding involves understanding the south, many generations back. Much of my reading is aimed at getting such an understanding, so any more of this is good I think. I've looked into some of the other names and there are trends back to early immigration and even into what those families experienced in the old world that may have motivated them to move, and once in america why they tended to over time end up where they were in '63. The reconstruction after the civil war seems in some cases encourage a 'retreat' to deeper south, perhaps explaining a concentration of the type of person in dominance in Dallas by the time of the assassination. JohnD

Of greater interest, as well as sociological impact, is the occupation of and control over the populace of New Orleans by Federal Troops.

New Orleans was of course forced to surrender with virtually no physical damage to the city. There are several reasons, of which one is the fact that New Orleans was the financial center of the South with it's own Stock Exchange which had close and direct connections to the New York City and other Exchanges.

Nevertheless, this "occupation" by Northern Troops left a bitterness in the populace of New Orleans which few could understand.

As example, in the battle of Vicksburg, MS, Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, 1863.

Thereafter, the City of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate the 4th of July as any form of holiday.

This continued until after WWII.

So, from 1863 until 1945, a total of 82 years, a grudge was held in which the people of Vicksburg, MS refused to celebrate Independence day of the Union.

Many of those Confederate Forces at Vicksburg who lost their lives were also from Louisiana.

And while they lost their life, those of great wealth in New Orleans, lost much of their wealth and prestige due to the loss of the war and occupation by Federal Forces.

Tom

P.S. P.G.T. Beauregard, Confederate hero of the battle of Ft. Sumpter, made his home at New Orleans.

And, after the end of the war, many of those Generals from the Confederacy settled here.

Frequently, in order to attempt to get those who are truely interested in research to do so, I have asked LHO related "trivia" questions.

In the event anyone has not found this prior, it is sometimes worthwhile.

So: Anyone know the connection(s) between LHO & P.G.T. Beauregard?

___________________________________________________________________

On December 6, 1889, Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, died at the New Orleans, LA home of Judge Charles E. Fenner.

Thus beginning another chain of events in history which ultimately resulted in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States of America.

Judge Charles E. Fenner:

a. Son of a Confederate Officer/Doctor.

b. Founder of "Fenner's Battery" of the Louisiana Artillery/Confederate Officer himself.

c. Later associated with the "Washington Artillery" of New Orleans.

d. Father of Charles E. Fenner of the brokerage firm of "Pierce, Fenner, &

Beane" which later joined with the brokerage firm of Merrill Lynch.

e. Member of the Board of Trustees of Tulane University, along with a host of

other former Confederate veterans.

f. Grandfather of Darwin S. Fenner who defended Tulane University against

Federal mandated integration.

g. Partner in a New Orleans law firm with William Wirt Howe

___________________________________________________________________

In the late 1890's, Mrs. Clarisse Fenner Pendleton, of New Orleans, LA, purchased the Jefferson Davis plantation "Rosemont".

Thereafter, she maintained the plantation/home for a few years before placing it into the hands of a very old and prominent Mississippi and Louisiana family.

http:/www.rosemontplantation.com/history.htm

____________________________________________________________________

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Please excuse the posting problems. We continue to have thunderstorms from the rainfall of Hurricane Dennis, and the power is off & on. Thus affecting what gets sent.

____________________________________________________________________

1940: Merrill Lynch opens it's first foreign office in Havana, cuba

1941: Merrill Lynch, E.A. Pierce & Cassatt merge with Fenner & Beane, a securities firm originally based in New Orleans.

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane becomes the world's largest securities house with offices in 93* cities and memberships in 28 exchanges.

*Including Dallas, TX

1961: Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane are forced into closing their Havana, Cuba office.

11/14/63: Charles E. Fenner (Jr.), co-founder of the New Orleans brokerage firm of Fenner & Beane which later consolidated with Merrill Lynch, died at his residence in Slidell, LA.

Born 9/4/1876 in New Orleans, LA, the son of New Orleans Attorney and Judge Charles E. Fenner (Sr.), Mr. Fenner (Jr.) was approximately 13 years old at the time that former President of the Confederate States of America Jefferson Davis died in the home of his father Judge Fenner.

____________________________________________________________________

My Note: For those who continue to search for the "Lost Treasury" of the Confederacy, might I recommend searching in the vicinity of Wall Street.

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Stephen Turner

Thank you for taking the time to post this information Tom, a fascinating look at the "Old South" I await your next lesson with interest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting history. Jefferson Davis was one of the ringleaders in the coup which removed Lincoln, according to Thomas Buchanan in "Who killed Kennedy?"(1964).

Drawing parallels between the two assasinations, he describes how Davis, with Northern troops and imminent capture on the horizon, aided by his wife and her sister, emerged from his tent dressed as an old lady. Sadly, his army boots gave him away. He might have been Hoover's role model. ;)

Another coincidence--Jefferson Davis Tippit.

Edited by Mark Stapleton
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...