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Mary Pinchot Meyer


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#46 Pat Speer

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 10:52 AM

I do not believe in a Grand Conspiracy to kill JFK. I suspect very few people knew about the assassination. For the most part, even those involved would not have had a full picture of events. I suspect it was carried out in a similar fashion to the way the OSS acted in the Second World War - after all, that is where most of them got their training.

However, I do believe that a lot of people were involved in the cover-up of the assassination. Not that these people would have been aware of who was behind the conspiracy to kill JFK. The main aim of Operation Mockingbird was to exploit people in the media by appealing to their desire to be patriotic. I don’t for a moment believe that Ben Bradlee knew who killed JFK. What he was probably told that it was for the good of America that people believed that JFK had been killed by a lone assassin. This is similar to the story that LBJ told his friends in the media after the assassination: “If the truth comes out we will have a nuclear war.”

Media reporting of the assassination is of vital importance in understanding how the event was perceived by the American public. After all, in the days before the Internet, how did people get their information?

Operation Mockingbird had all the major newspapers and magazines covered. It always had problems with the alternative press. Cord Meyer has some interesting things to say about this. His view was that these media outlets were under the control of the KGB (unlike the rest, which was under the control of the CIA). It seems Operation Mockingbird did not include the National Enquirer (probably for the reasons you gave). However, we now know that James Truitt was telling the truth about the role played by Angleton and Bradlee in getting rid of any of Mary’s incriminating documents (remember, it was not only the diary Angleton destroyed).

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Well, then I guess we're not as far apart as I thought. I think Specter, Ford, Humes, Boswell, etc. all told little lies and made minor misrepresentations for political purposes, not realizing they were covering-up a conspiracy. I think Baden, Guinn, Canning etc, took their moment in the sun before the HSCA to try and show that those darned conspiracy buffs were wrong, and inadvertently buried the truth. The only individuals involved in the investigations I don't trust are Hoover and Warren; I don't believe either one of them would have allowed the WC to come down with a conspiracy verdict. That both of them seem to have adopted this attitude reflects back on LBJ, I believe.

#47 Peter Janney

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 01:31 PM

My perspective about the JFK Assassination, the assassination of Mary Pinchot Meyer (who was JFK's last true love), and The Warren Commission, as well as a number events has been informed largely by my growing up in Washington, D.C. My father was career CIA and as a family we were in close proximity with many of the controversial power broker people in Washington at the time (i.e. Ben Bradlee, Kay Graham, James Jesus Angleton, Tracy Barnes, Richard Helms,etc). I knew these people; I was friends with many of their children. I witnessed many, many things in regard to what was going on at the time.

Like many of you, I have spent a number of years being overwhelmed with what Hollywood director called "the crime of the century," which was the assassination of JFK. I have met privately with Stone and talked with him about a number of things.

I also knew Mary Pinchot Meyer and her family. Mary's husband, Cord Meyer, worked together at the CIA. Our families were quite close; her middle child Michael was my "best friend" at age 9 when he was killed by a car crossing the street at dusk. My mother and Mary Meyer were college roomates at Vassar, along with Scottie Fitzgerald (F. Scott Fitzgerald's only daughter) and several others.

Since 1976, I have made it my business to get to the bottom of Mary Meyer's murder. There have been three attempts by authors to write books about Mary Meyer. The first attempt, and by far the most thorough, was made by author Leo Damore. Damore created a legendary reputation as a dogged, thorough researcher with the publication of his book Senatorial Privilege This was the definitive book about Ted Kennedy and the death of Mary Jo Kopeckne. Damore brought that same tenacity to his research on Mary Meyer, all of which I currently own. It was Damore who solved the crime about who actually murdered Mary Meyer, and I will go into that later. Damore committed suicide in 1995 and his book, Burden of Guilt, was never published ( I have several of his manuscripts). John Davis, a well-respected author and JFK researcher, then tried to pick up some of Damore's research and tried to write his book about Mary. He never finished it.(though I have his manuscript) When asked by a close friend why he did not finish it, he replied, "I wanted to live..." meaning that his life had been threatened. Davis has since had a bad stroke and is barely coherent. Nina Burleigh, as many of you know, has so far written the only book about Mary Meyer. There is another book, however, in the works by authors Myrna Firestone and Don Shannon who will claim that the CIA was responsible for Mary Meyer's death. I have talked to them, but they did not want to reveal anything to me.

The question, with regard to Mary Meyer's assassination, is why was it necessary to take her out? What did she know that could have proven to be so important and potentially embarassing to any number of people in the government and particularly the CIA? The last published piece about Mary Meyer so far came out in 2003. It was a chapter in C. David Heymann's book The Georgetown Ladies Social Club. I know Heymann well and we have talked for hours. When he confronted Cord Meyer shortly before his death and asked him who he thought had actually killed his former wife Mary Meyer, Cord replied, "the same sons of bitches who killed John F. Kennedy!"

#48 Larry Hancock

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 02:50 PM

I'm not able to contribute anything that would help in the question of Meyer's murder but offer the following observation about Angleton's interest in her diary.

Angleton was a "collector" of very special executive quality dirt, in particular material that could be used for blackmail and other leverage. Perhaps he simply thought of it as "intelligence", certainly he represented it as such. It was well known that he ran his own bugs in D.C. including those on Agency personnel and that he shared anecdotes from the tapes with his boss. He maintained his own private vault and after he was fired the staff assigned to inventory it and reclaim material into the regular files were amazed at the contents, much of which apparently had nothing to do with his department or assignment (including a set of RFK autopsy photos).

Angleton also did his own black bag jobs, reportingly including ones on the French Embassy in D.C. in 1963.

So we find Angleton collecting Meyer's diary, Mann's safe contents and manuscript and RFK's autopsy photos. And having the autonomy to do so and very possibly collect it into his own private archive - perhaps only to be shared with Richard Helms? Or to be used to leverage further "collections". One thing is certain - nobody ever seems to have questioned James Angleton, he pretty much did what he wanted. Perhaps his collection explains that. Perhaps it also explains why he (and CI/SIG) were allowed to know about and insert themselves into virtually any plan or project on a non-compartimentilized level, the only part of the Agency to have such reach.

The question then is whether Angleton's collection of Meyer's diary is signficant to the JFK conspiracy or merely SOP for Angleton.

#49 Jefferson Morley

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 02:53 PM

There is very little on the web on Mary Pinchot Meyer. The top ranking page of course is on the McAdams website. Written by Ben Hayes it attempts to show that there is nothing suspicious about the murder of Meyer. It concludes with the following:

Does the evidence suggest that Mary Pinchot Meyer was bumped off as part of a conspiracy involving the assassination of President John F. Kennedy? The first question we must ask in order to answer this is, could Mary have gained information that was dangerous enough to warrant her being murdered? There is little doubt that Mary was in fact Kennedy's mistress, but, as his mistress, what could she have found out from him? If John Kennedy knew something of his own assassination, he certainly would have taken protective measures to prevent it. Furthermore, those who have read her diary give no suggestion that it contained any information having to do with the assassination. There was a conspiracy to cover up the existence of the diary, but it was the sole intent of that conspiracy to cover up Mary's affair with President Kennedy.

Mary's concern over her diary could suggest that she was aware of her imminent demise, but if she had information that was dangerous to her life, why didn't she talk about it? The more she talked, the less valuable her death would become, but she apparently did not make any such statements before her death, and none were included in her diary.

As discussed previously, the CIA connection with her death is really not all that mysterious. Mary had been married to a high ranking CIA official, and as a result, she knew people associated with the CIA. Ben Bradlee, an extremely liberal journalist and a member of the group that initially broke the Watergate scandal, is most zealous in denying a CIA connection that he allegedly helped cover up. Phil Nobilem and Ron Rosenbaum quote Ben Bradlee as saying in regards to the CIA connection, "If there was anything there, I would have done it (written the story) myself" (Philip Nobilem and Ron Rosenbaum, New Times 9th July, 1976)

Perhaps the best evidence that there was nothing sinister with Mary Meyer's death is the murder itself. Even though Ray Crump was eventually found "not guilty," it is fairly obvious that he probably did commit the murder. The case is officially unsolved, but the case is also officially closed.

The testimony of Henry Wiggins also suggests that Mary was not murdered as the result of a professional hit. He said she yelled, "Someone help me, someone help me," and then she was shot. As Tuco, played by Eli Wallach, said in The Good, the Bad, the Ugly, "When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk." A professional hitman would not try to molest someone before they killed him or her. This would only give the victim the opportunity to yell for help. A profession hit would be quick and as silent as possible so as not to draw attention. Mary Meyer's murder was apparently a botched rape or robbery attempt, in which, as she tried to escape, or get help, was gunned down.

After extensive investigating, we can see that Mary Pinchot Meyer's death had nothing to do with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. As with so many other mystery deaths, we find that Mary Pinchot Meyer died because of an unlucky set of events. She was brutally murdered by a disturbed young man, as was her lover, as are so many people each and every day.


As always on McAdams' website. Important information is left out of this story.

Mary Pinchot married Cord Meyer in 1945. At the time Meyer was an advocate of world government. In 1948 he attended the San Francisco Conference as an aide to Harold Stassen. After the formation of the United Nations Meyer established the United World Federalists, an organization that promoted the idea of a world without nuclear weapons.

Cord Meyer had been shocked by the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. After the war Meyer commissioned a film by Pare Lorentz called The Beginning or the End. Meyer wanted this film to be the definitive statement about the dangers of the atomic age.

Mary and her husband lived in Washington and became members of the Georetown Crowd. This group included Frank Wisner, Richard Bissell, Desmond FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Tracy Barnes, Philip Graham, Katharine Graham, David Bruce, Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow, Eugene Rostow, Chip Bohlen and Paul Nitze.

Frank Wisner was director of the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This became the espionage and counter-intelligence branch of the Central Intelligence Agency. Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on "propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures; subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements in threatened countries of the free world."

In 1950 Meyer formed the Committee to Frame a World Constitution with Robert Maynard Hutchins and Elizabeth Mann Borgese. As a result of this work Meyer made contact with the International Cooperative Alliance, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the Indian Socialist Party and the Congress of Peoples Against Imperialism.

Although Cord Meyer was attacked by people such as Joseph McCarthy as being a subversive at the time, he was in reality working for the Central Intelligence Agency. Frank Wisner had recruited him as part of Operation Mockingbird, a CIA program to influence the American media. According to Deborah Davis (Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post): Meyer was Mockingbird's "principal operative".

In 1956 Cord Meyer became a covert operations agent in Europe. Mary did not go with him and later that year the couple were divorced. Mary went to live with her sister, Antoinette Pinchot and her husband Ben Bradlee. The Bradlees set up Mary's apartment and art studio in their converted garage.

Mary started a relationship with the artist, Kenneth Noland. She had an active social life and in January, 1962, began an affair with President John F. Kennedy. She told her friends, Ann and James Truitt, that she was keeping a diary about the affair. The relationship lasted until his death on November, 1963.

On 12th October, 1964, Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead as she walked along the Chesapeake and Ohio towpath in Georgetown. Henry Wiggins, a car mechanic, was working on a vehicle on Canal Road, when he heard a woman shout out: "Someone help me, someone help me". He then heard two gunshots. Wiggins ran to the edge of the wall overlooking the towpath. He later told police he saw "a black man in a light jacket, dark slacks, and a dark cap standing over the body of a white woman."

Soon afterwards Raymond Crump, a black man, was found not far from the murder scene. He was arrested and charged with Mary's murder. The towpath and the river were searched but no murder weapon was ever found.

During the trial Wiggins was unable to identify Raymond Crump as the man standing over Meyer's body. The prosecution was also handicaped by the fact that the police had been unable to find the murder weapon at the scene of the crime. On 29th July, 1965, Crump was acquitted of murdering Mary Meyer. The case remains unsolved.

In March, 1976, James Truitt gave an interview to the National Enquirer. Truitt told the newspaper that Mary Pinchot Meyer was having an affair with John F. Kennedy. He also claimed that Meyer had told his wife, Ann Truitt, that she was keeping an account of this relationship in her diary. Meyer asked Truitt to take possession of a private diary "if anything ever happened to me".

Ann Truitt was living in Tokyo at the time of the murder. She phoned Ben Bradlee at his home and asked him if he had found the diary. Bradlee, who claimed he was unaware of his sister-in-law's affair with Kennedy, knew nothing about the diary. He later recalled what he did after Truitt's phone-call: "We didn't start looking until the next morning, when Tony and I walked around the corner a few blocks to Mary's house. It was locked, as we had expected, but when we got inside, we found Jim Angleton, and to our complete surprise he told us he, too, was looking for Mary's diary."

James Angleton, CIA counter-intelligence chief, admitted that he knew of Mary's relationship with John F. Kennedy and was searching her home looking for her diary and any letters that would reveal details of the affair. According to Ben Bradlee, it was Mary's sister, Antoinette Bradlee, who found the diary and letters a few days later. It was claimed that the diary was in a metal box in Mary's studio. The contents of the box were given to Angleton who claimed he burnt the diary (this was later found to be untrue).

Leo Damore claimed in an article that appeared in the New York Post that the reason Angleton and Bradlee were looking for the diary was that: "She (Meyer) had access to the highest levels. She was involved in illegal drug activity. What do you think it would do to the beatification of Kennedy if this woman said, 'It wasn't Camelot, it was Caligula's court'?"

There is another possible reason why both Angleton and Bradlee were searching for documents in Meyer's house. Meyer had been married to a leading CIA operative involved in a variety of covert operations in the early 1950s. Were they worried that Meyer had kept a record of these activities? Was this why Mary Pinochet Meyer had been murdered?

Is it a coincidence that the two women closest to JFK died in the years following his assassination. Did JFK tell Mary Meyer and Florence Smith something that was not good for their health?

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#50 Dawn Meredith

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 07:57 PM

Since 1976, I have made it my business to get to the bottom of Mary Meyer's murder. There have been three attempts by authors to write books about Mary Meyer.

John Davis, a well-respected author and JFK researcher, then tried to pick up some of Damore's research and tried to write his book about Mary. He never finished it.(though I have his manuscript) When asked by a close friend why he did not finish it, he replied, "I wanted to live..." meaning that his life had been threatened.

When he confronted Cord Meyer shortly before his death and asked him who he thought had actually killed his former wife Mary Meyer, Cord replied, "the same sons of bitches who killed John F. Kennedy!"

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Peter:

Welcome to the forum. Very interesting post. Do you intend to publish Damore's research?

Do you think he really killed himself?

Who do you think threatened John Davis' life? (Since he has written extensively about the Mob it was not a member of that organization.)

Who do you think "the same sons of bitches who killed john F. Kennedy" are? (If you have an opinion on this one. I happen to agree with Cord Meyer's comment.)

Anyone who has spend time studying this case believes that the murder of JFk and the murder of Mary Meyer are connected.

Dawn

#51 John Simkin

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:33 AM

Since 1976, I have made it my business to get to the bottom of Mary Meyer's murder. There have been three attempts by authors to write books about Mary Meyer. The first attempt, and by far the most thorough, was made by author Leo Damore. Damore created a legendary reputation as a dogged, thorough researcher with the publication of his book Senatorial Privilege This was the definitive book about Ted Kennedy and the death of Mary Jo Kopeckne. Damore brought that same tenacity to his research on Mary Meyer, all of which I currently own. It was Damore who solved the crime about who actually murdered Mary Meyer, and I will go into that later. Damore committed suicide in 1995 and his book, Burden of Guilt, was never published ( I have several of his manuscripts).

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Does this mean that you have the Burden of Guilt manuscript? If so, could you summarize his theory of Mary Meyer’s death?

John Davis, a well-respected author and JFK researcher, then tried to pick up some of Damore's research and tried to write his book about Mary. He never finished it.(though I have his manuscript) When asked by a close friend why he did not finish it, he replied, "I wanted to live..." meaning that his life had been threatened. Davis has since had a bad stroke and is barely coherent.

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Could you summarize John Davis’ theory of Mary Meyer’s death?


The question, with regard to Mary Meyer's assassination, is why was it necessary to take her out? What did she know that could have proven to be so important and potentially embarassing to any number of people in the government and particularly the CIA? The last published piece about Mary Meyer so far came out in 2003. It was a chapter in C. David Heymann's book The Georgetown Ladies Social Club. I know Heymann well and we have talked for hours. When he confronted Cord Meyer shortly before his death and asked him who he thought had actually killed his former wife Mary Meyer, Cord replied, "the same sons of bitches who killed John F. Kennedy!"

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Does this quote appear in The Georgetown Ladies? Did Cord Meyer say anything more about the assassination of JFK?

#52 Dixie Dea

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:50 PM

Peter Janney

Welcome! I am hoping to learn all that you will be able to tell us, in regard to Mary Meyer, as well as other information.

By coincidence, I just finished reading "The Georgetown Ladies' Social Club" by C. David Heymann. I gained much more insight into the Georgetown, Washington Post and CIA connections which came about largely through their wives social functions. After dinner, the men always went into another room for discussions. while the ladies remained alone to socialize.....that is, until Katherine Graham changed that tradition.

I learned a lot more from this book, then I had anticipated, when I bought it...and do recommend it.

I can also answer John's questions in regard to Cord Meyer....pages 167-168
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Cord Meyer gave expression to his support of Angleton in, "Facing Reality," an autobiography subtitled, "From World Federalism to the CIA." In the same volume, he comments briefly on the murder of his wife: "I was satisfied by the conclusions of the police investigation that Mary had been the victim of a sexually motivated assault by a single individual and that she had been killed i in her struggle to escape." Carol Delaney, a family friend and longtime personal assistant to Cord Meyer, observed that, "Mr. Meyer didn't for a minute think that Ray Crump had murdered his wife or that it had been an attempted rape. But, being an Agency man, he couldn't"t very well accuse the CIA of the crime, although the murder had all the markings of an in-house rubout."

Asked to comment on the case, by the current author (C. David Heymann), Cord Meyer held court at the beginning of February 2001==six weeks before his death--in the barren dining room of a Washington nursing home. Propped up in a chair, his glass eye bulging, he struggled to hold his head aloft. Although he was no longer able to read, the nurses supplied him with a daily copy of The Washington Post, which he carried with him wherever he went. "My father died of a heart attack the same year Mary was killed , " he whispered. "It was a bad time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed John F. Kennedy."

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Dixie

#53 John Simkin

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 12:09 PM

In 1964, a year after the President’s assassination, she was murdered as she walked along a tow-path next to the Potomac river. Meyer’s killer, according to police reports, grabbed her from behind and in broad daylight shot the 42 year old just once under the cheekbone. Her killer escaped and Meyer died instantly.

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Mary was actually shot twice. The evidence suggested she had been killed by a professional hitman. The first bullet was fired at the back of the head. She did not die straight away. A second shot was fired into the heart (from behind). The evidence suggests that in both cases, the gun was virtually touching Mary’s body when it was fired. As the FBI expert testified, the “dark haloes on the skin around both entry wounds suggested they had been fired at close-range, possibly point-blank”.

The ‘Meyer Conspiracy’ proponents, Damore and Davis, researched the story in the early 1990s. Damore said he persuaded many government officials to talk for the first time about the case and they agreed that Mary Meyer was murdered because she knew too much. They said that some very powerful people feared that Meyer knew the ‘real secret’ of the JFK assassination.

One of Damore’s sources was a retired police detective who had worked on the case in 1964. (10) He said that the murder was the work of a professional assassin and that the federal government was involved. The federal government, apparently, had put pressure on the police department to close the case quickly.

The simple facts of the case are quite different. (11) An African-American male, Raymond Crump, was spotted near the murder scene, and was arrested and charged with Meyer’s murder. The evidence against Crump was strong. Witnesses near the scene of the attempted rape or mugging heard shots; one of them, Henry Wiggins, identified Crump as the man who stood over Meyer’s body shortly after the shots had been fired. Crump had been arrested approximately ¾ of an hour after Mary Meyer had been killed. He had been hiding in some bushes near the scene of the crime. He lied to police officers and had fresh cuts and bruises on his body. However, a jury acquitted Crump in the face of overwhelming circumstantial evidence due mainly to an inept prosecutor. The case came down to a choice between believing Crump who appeared to be a quiet and reverent soul, and witness Wiggins who had been a war veteran and former military policeman. It would appear that the trial had been a precursor to O. J. Simpson’s; race had played an important part in the proceedings.

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This is outrageous. Your suggestion that he only got off because he was black is deeply racist (“a precursor to O. J. Simpson’s; race had played an important part in the proceedings”). The reason Crump got off wa because he was innocent, not because he was black.

The evidence against Crump was weak not strong. The jury had no option but to find him not guilty.

The prosecution case was that they cordoned off the land where the murder took place and therefore the killer was unable to escape from the scene of the crime. As they arrested Crump by the canal it was argued that he must be the killer. There were several problems with this defence. First of all, Crump’s lawyer, Dovey Roundtree, was able to show that the police had not in fact cordoned off the canal towpath within minutes of the murder.

The second problem was the gun. If Crump had been trapped within the confines of this small area, what had he done with the gun? Despite an extensive search of the area no gun could be found. This included a two day search of the tow path by 40 police officers. The police also drained the canal near to the murder scene. Police scuba divers searched the waters away from where Mary was killed. However, no gun could be found. Nor could the prosecution find any link between Crump and any Smith and Wesson gun.

Police tests were unable to show that Crump had recently fired a gun. There were no trace of nitrates on his hands or clothes.

During the trial Wiggins was unable to positively identify Raymond Crump as the man standing over Meyer's body. (I noticed the way how you attempted to persuade your readers to your view of the killing by describing Wiggins as a "war veteran and former military policeman").

The prosecution was also handicapped by the fact that the police had been unable to provide a crediable motive for the crime. For example, what evidence have you that Crump tried to rape her? Not that pathetic prosecution claim that his flies were undone. We also know that no money was taken from the body so robbery did not appear to be a motive.

There have been contradictory accounts of how the diary was found but there is no credible evidence to support the theory that Mary Meyer had been murdered to silence her. If ‘government agents’ had indeed killed her then why would they leave a witness at the scene to identify the real culprits? Would the killers not have been afraid that the man arrested for the murder might reveal their true identities?

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We now know the full details of how the diary was found. We now know that James Angleton and Ben Bradlee were desperate to get hold of this diary. Why was Angleton allowed to keep the diary? Did it not belong to Mary’s children? Why was it destroyed?

You seem to be very naive about how contract killers work. Wiggins posed no threat to this killer. He was unable to get a good view of the killer (as he admitted in court). Nor can contract killers ever be linked backed to government agencies. Even the person involved in arranging the “hit” would be a freelance without any obvious links to the CIA.

Have you read C. David Heymann’s The Georgetown Ladies' Social Club (2003). In February, 2001, the writer, Heymann, asked Cord Meyer about the death of Mary Pinchot Meyer: "My father died of a heart attack the same year Mary was killed, " he whispered. "It was a bad time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed John F. Kennedy."

#54 Nina Burleigh

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 04:26 PM

(1) Do you believe Timothy Leary’s account of his relationship with Mary Meyer?

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Up to a point, yes. I think he knew her and possibly did drugs with her or shared his drugs with her or talked to her about them. LSD was a very trendy drug with the artsy edgy people then. My problem is that he had no corroborating evidence - not a single eyewitness, not a hotel bill, no contemporaneous notes, to back up his claims. Given his lifetime drug use, I felt I needed that to be certain of his memories.

(2) During your research into the Meyer killing did you ever come across the names of Herminio Diaz Garcia and Bernardo de Torres? I have been told that they might have been responsible for her death.

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I did not, but I'd be very interested to hear more. Please fill me in.

(3) Did you find any evidence that the killing was a CIA operation?

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No. I can't say I disproved that theory though. There remains, in my mind, a ten percent chance that someone besides Crump did it.

(4) Did you read Leo Damore’s manuscript on Mary Meyer?

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An assistant of his shared his papers, and notes with me, I have since learned that he did not share everything however.

(5) What do you make of this passage in C. David Heymann’s book, The Georgetown Ladies' Social Club (2003)

Asked to comment on the case, by the current author (C. David Heymann), Cord Meyer held court at the beginning of February 2001 - six weeks before his death - in the barren dining room of a Washington nursing home. Propped up in a chair, his glass eye bulging, he struggled to hold his head aloft. Although he was no longer able to read, the nurses supplied him with a daily copy of The Washington Post, which he carried with him wherever he went. "My father died of a heart attack the same year Mary was killed , " he whispered. "It was a bad time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed John F. Kennedy."

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Absolute utter hogwash. Cord Meyer was apparently enraged at my well-researched book, and I cannot believe he would sit down with Heymann, no matter how near death.

At the end of his life, Cord had a very disfigured visage from mouth and jaw cancer - you would think Heymann would have mentioned that fact if he had seen him in the flesh.

#55 Lee Forman

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 07:50 PM

Hello Nina.

I thoroughly enjoyed your book - A Very Private Woman. Great stuff. I probably need to reread it. If memory serves, in the preface, you were considering some FOIAs to uncover additional material? Is there any plan for an ammended 2nd edition? Is there anything new that you may be willing to share here on the Forum since the book was originally published?

The only CIA files I was able to uncover on Mary Meyer were dated 1953, and were 95% redacted. Is there any chance that additional files exist?

Any idea as to whom the owner was of the stalled Rambler that Wiggins and Branch were called out to service while Mary was being murdered? What time the call was placed? If eventually the car was actually serviced - following the murder? Any additional details about the car itself?

Sorry for all the questions. Just very bizarre coincidence to have 2 potential ear/eyewitnesses show up within moments of the gunshots.

- lee

#56 John Simkin

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 08:28 AM

Interesting article by Nan C. Druid that originally appeared in High Frontiers Magazine in 1985. It is the first time that I have heard that Lisa Howard knew Mary Pinchot Meyer.

http://www.sirbacon.org/jfk.htm

#57 Lee Forman

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 09:23 PM

Interesting article by Nan C. Druid that originally appeared in High Frontiers Magazine in 1985. It is the first time that I have heard that Lisa Howard knew Mary Pinchot Meyer.

http://www.sirbacon.org/jfk.htm

John,

It's an interesting article, but unless Maerian could provide a source reference, it is a work of fiction, mixed with a lot of fact. Her reference to the Lisa and Mary incident is 'Flashbacks' and Lisa does not appear to have been mentioned.

http://www.caw.org/c...rian/index.html

- lee

#58 Shanet Clark

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 12:33 PM

I have always supported the TIM LEARY / MARY PINCHOT MEYER / JFK
connection. She was chillingly destroyed and since her husband was CIA, Mockingbird, etc....

so something is clearly up. She was probably so heavily featured in the
surveillance dossier that derogated JFK that her very life and mind was
considered classified and she was permanently silenced.

Tapes, trips and counter reactionary intrigues in the 1960's racial,
gendered and politically charged psychopharmacognomy conflicts
over control of the USA figuratively and literally in the nineteen sixties.

:ph34r: :) :ph34r: :ph34r: :ph34r: :(

Edited by Shanet Clark, 04 June 2006 - 12:34 PM.


#59 Robert Howard

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 04:33 PM

I have always supported the TIM LEARY / MARY PINCHOT MEYER / JFK
connection. She was chillingly destroyed and since her husband was CIA, Mockingbird, etc....

so something is clearly up. She was probably so heavily featured in the
surveillance dossier that derogated JFK that her very life and mind was
considered classified and she was permanently silenced.

Tapes, trips and counter reactionary intrigues in the 1960's racial,
gendered and politically charged psychopharmacognomy conflicts
over control of the USA figuratively and literally in the nineteen sixties.

:ph34r: :) :ph34r: :ph34r: :ph34r: :(


The question then is whether Angleton's collection of Meyer's diary is signficant to the JFK conspiracy or merely SOP for Angleton.

Larry Hancock's question comment really does touch on the salient point re not only Mary Pinchot Meyer, but arguably the dynamics of the various 'interlocking' relationships in the US Government of that time. I wanted to point out that Angleton's presence to procure Mary Meyer's diary, was not the only time that he participated in such an activity. Angleton was also involved in the Win Scott affair, which also covered a miasma of other connections such as Oswald in Mexico, David A. Phillips, Anne Goodpasture, etc...to say that particular area of the JFK assassination controversy goes to the heart of the matter, would be, in my estimation... an accurate observation. The only other item I would mention, is the fact that Angleton was also allegedly a member of the Shickshinny Knight's of Malta, [depending on your acceptance of citations re same] so where does that lead one? Ultimately, I would add to the proverbial beginning of the whole conundrum of, not 'who killed JFK' but who was 'responsible' for the assassination itself. The interlocking relationships aspect is further complicated by the fact that there were so many salient documents regarding the matter destroyed or missing, see ARRB Final Report and you may get an idea of what documents I reference, [as space does not allow it here.] Perhaps the biggest contribution I can make to this thread is mentioning a source document which, unfortunately I mself do not have, [although it is obtainable and that is Elites in American History - Philip H. Burch, to cite just one passage from 'Elites' on page 197.]

"Burch notes that,
'in the months after JFK's death, William Bundy was moved from his Defense post to replace the pro- Kennedy political-solution-for-Vietnam advocate Roger Hilsman as Secretary of State for East Asian Affairs. Soon thereafter he became a director of the C.F.R. and, more recently, served as editor of its preeminent foreign policy journal, Foreign Affairs.

My quoting from a book, which I don't own is from the information regarding the same matter referenced below, included in William Davy's book.

cit. Afterword page 224 footnote #9 Let Justice Be Done - New Light on the Garrison Investigation - William Davy - 1999, the passage in Davy's book is on page 207 where he mention's "Garrison, notes Sklar, was becoming especially interested in the Bundy brothers, McGeorge and his elder brother William, a former CIA official who was Dean Acheson's son-in-law and held a significant Defense Department post on international security in the Kennedy Administration."
There's nothing new under the sun, except the history you don't know. - Pres. Harry S. Truman

Edited by Robert Howard, 04 June 2006 - 04:55 PM.


#60 Shanet Clark

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 03:26 AM

To Robert Howard:

Thank you for linking WILLIAM BUNDY to the counter intelligence procedures present in the Kennedy era, MCGEORGE BUNDY to CORD MEYER and DESMOND FITZGERALD then active.

I am a strong MARK LANE and FLETCHER PROUTY theorist and the emphasis on WILLIAM BUNDY, MCGEORGE BUNDY and the CIA National Security Council links the JFK assassination to



SKUNK and BONES




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