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I see that Peter Janney's book, Mary's Mosaic: Mary Pinchot Meyer & John F. Kennedy and Their Vision for World Peace is due to be published in January 2012.

http://www.spartacus...k/JFKmeyerM.htm

Oh no. Just what we need.

Yech.

While I agree with Jim D. on many issues, I think Peter Janney deserves to be heard before being criticized.

I've never met Peter Janney, but I've corresponded with him, and while he acknowledges that his father worked for the CIA, he has used that to get the inside information from people like Dino Brugioni of NPIC and others who would not normally talk to conspiracy theorists.

Janney is also the source of the CD of Homer McMahon's ARRB testimony, which he graciously shared with anyone who asked for it.

From what I understand, he has new information that extends beyond the murder of Mary Meyer and could have an impact on the assassination.

I'll wait to read it before I cast judgement on it.

BK

jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com

Edited by William Kelly
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I see that Peter Janney's book, Mary's Mosaic: Mary Pinchot Meyer & John F. Kennedy and Their Vision for World Peace is due to be published in January 2012.

http://www.spartacus...k/JFKmeyerM.htm

Oh no. Just what we need.

Yech.

While I agree with Jim D. on many issues, I think Peter Janney deserves to be heard before being criticized.

I've never met Peter Janney, but I've corresponded with him, and while he acknowledges that his father worked for the CIA, he has used that to get the inside information from people like Dino Brugioni of NPIC and others who would not normally talk to conspiracy theorists.

Janney is also the source of the CD of Homer McMahon's ARRB testimony, which he graciously shared with anyone who asked for it.

From what I understand, he has new information that extends beyond the murder of Mary Meyer and could have an impact on the assassination.

I'll wait to read it before I cast judgement on it.

BK

jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com

I read the first draft of the book and I was very impressed. Since then he has carried out other interviews, including one with Ben Bradlee, that he says will cause a stir.

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I see that Peter Janney's book, Mary's Mosaic: Mary Pinchot Meyer & John F. Kennedy and Their Vision for World Peace is due to be published in January 2012.

http://www.spartacus...k/JFKmeyerM.htm

Oh no. Just what we need.

Yech.

While I agree with Jim D. on many issues, I think Peter Janney deserves to be heard before being criticized.

I've never met Peter Janney, but I've corresponded with him, and while he acknowledges that his father worked for the CIA, he has used that to get the inside information from people like Dino Brugioni of NPIC and others who would not normally talk to conspiracy theorists.

Janney is also the source of the CD of Homer McMahon's ARRB testimony, which he graciously shared with anyone who asked for it.

From what I understand, he has new information that extends beyond the murder of Mary Meyer and could have an impact on the assassination.

I'll wait to read it before I cast judgement on it.

BK

jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com

Bill, I read a synopsis of the book.

It is really out there. I mean really. The suppositions this guy makes about Mary sort of being JFK's muse, and the sources he trusts, like that xxxx Leary and Mr. CIA Ben Bradlee, these are simply unjustified. To me it is a typical example of a guy having an objective first and then filling it in later with whatever comes his way.

Sort of like Waldron in that regard.

There is so much good info out there now with the ARRB files that we can solve this case without stuff like this and witnesses like Leary and My God, Bradlee?!? I mean of all people! Mr. JFK cover up himself.

Or maybe you and John do not know just how bad Bradlee is. In addition to the disifno on MM and JFK, at the time of the HSCA concluding, Tony Summers called him up. Summers told him that he should look into the whole Phillips/Veciana/Bishop angle. Bradlee called in an intern named David Leigh and told him to look into it. But he then added that he wanted him to try and discredit the story! (With friends like DIck Helms, of course.)

Well Leigh said that he came back a couple of weeks later and told Ben something he did not want to hear: He could not discredit it. It looked like it was true to him. Bradlee was pissed. So he killed the story.

So please, do not tell me about any wondrous interviews decades later between Janney and Mr. Cover Up. Recall, it was Bradlee who was editor when the Post printed the editorial about the two assassins in Dealey Plaza who did not know each other.

Yes, James, I am aware of everything you say, and agree with you, but - BUT - David Leigh, now a respected London journalist, did write a story that was killed by Bradlee, but it should be published or made available elsewhere.

Apparently David Leigh accompanied Summers when he interviewed Virginia Prewett, the NANA reporter who knew both David Atlee Phillips, "Maurice Bishop" and Antonio Veciana, and ackowleged as much to both journalists before she died shortly thereafter.

Summers says he has copy of David Leigh's article that Bradlee refused to publish, and John Simkin said that he knew David Leigh from the English neighborhood, but neither Summers nor Simkin have been able to come up with a copy of the censored article that can be made available to the public, and Leigh has not responded to repeated requests for an interview about the story and to see if it can be published elsewhere.

So here we are, years - decades later, and Leigh's story is still filed away and has not been read publicly, and Bradlee is justifiably being criticized for his attempts to censor the story but rather than criticize Janney for trying to get some answers out of Bradlee and others, the effort should be made to get the article Leigh originally wrote and Bradlee refused to publish, and to await what Bradlee told Janney, whether you believe it or not.

I remember sitting at a table at the center cafe at Union Station in DC when a COPA board member pointed out Ben Bradlee walking by, and when I was about to go out of my way to flag him down and ask him to join us for a drink and conversation, I was stopped, and told that "he's the enemy," when in fact even if he was the enemy, he could have provided us with some interesting information and insights that I no longer have the opportunity to acquire.

I look forward to reading what Janney has to say, and will reiterate my request to Tony Summers and John Simkin to see if they can pry out the article that David Leigh originally wrote for Ben Bradlee and the Washington Post that has not yet seen the light of day.

Bill Kelly

jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com

Edited by William Kelly
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Summers says he has copy of David Leigh's article that Bradlee refused to publish, and John Simkin said that he knew David Leigh from the English neighborhood, but neither Summers nor Simkin have been able to come up with a copy of the censored article that can be made available to the public, and Leigh has not responded to repeated requests for an interview about the story and to see if it can be published elsewhere.

I taught his son when he was living in Brighton. I never met him and have never had a conversation with him about the article he wrote. Why don't you contact him about it: david.leigh@guardian.co.uk

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I see that Peter Janney's book, Mary's Mosaic: Mary Pinchot Meyer & John F. Kennedy and Their Vision for World Peace is due to be published in January 2012.

http://www.spartacus...k/JFKmeyerM.htm

For some background on the permutations of this book, see:

Beware: The Douglas/Janney/Simkin Silver Bullets

By James DiEugenio

http://www.ctka.net/djm.html

PF

I'd like to hear John Simkin's view of these events, if he can put it into fewer words.

BK

I dealt with all this on 10th October 2007:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=11208

Thank you for drawing my attention to the previous thread.

But Janney's "new" book will soon be arriving with -- if you are correct - new interviews.

So the debate is ongoing.

As Bill Kelly suggests, there is no harm in "reading" the book before "casting judgement."

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As I posted, Kathy, it was a different time, and for a brief period, the media had a different message, a different agenda.

Early adapters, the elite had their party and then became concerned that widespread use of hallucinogenics had the potential of removing the "sheeple" from the people, that cooperative ,unquestioning "sheep like" quality, the controlling influence on the masses from which the elite derive their personal security, the security of their assets, and the wealth inequity concentrated in their hands, almost completely unchallenged by the "have not", American masses. You have to tip toe around a populace you have propagandized/religionized into consistently voting against their own, best interests!

http://www.hofmann.o...rify/index.html

THE JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE Vol. 140, No. 3

Copyright © 1965 by The Williams & Wilkins Co. Printed in U.S.A.

CLARIFYING THE CONFUSION REGARDING LSD-25

CHARLES SAVAGE, M.D.1 AND MYRON J. STOLAROFF, M.A.

In recent months, both the lay and medical press have been filled with warnings about the dangers and harmful effects of the hallucinogenic agents such as LSD-25, mescaline and psilocybin. These warnings have risen in response to flagrant misuse of the substances by illicit operators using black-market materials for parties and "kicks," and by irresponsible investigators who, enthralled with the remarkable possibilities of these chemicals, have sponsored and encouraged their widespread use under improperly controlled conditions without medical supervision.

In the furor, sight has been lost of the great value of these agents. Summaries of the LSD controversy have appeared in the medical newspapers (3, 11), and two editorials that have been widely quoted in the public press have appeared in American Medical Association journals (6, 10). It is doubtful if any medical subject has received such complete coverage in the popular magazines over a short period of time (1, 4, 5, 7-9, 13, 14, 18, 26, 27). While all these articles have pointed out the dangers of the hallucinogens, they largely leave the reader unaware that there have been numerous studies of these agents as treatment for neurotic disturbances, and that encouraging success has resulted from their use. Few substances show such promise for deepening the understanding of mental phenomena, clarifying the many complex theories of personality, dynamics and behavior, and permitting rapid resolution of emotional difficulties.

An excellent review of the literature by the National Institute of Mental Health psychologist, Sanford Unger, appeared in the May 1963 issue of Psychiatry (25). This comprehensive review has not been mentioned in the recent publicity. It is true that much more work, with tighter research designs and more carefully controlled studies, is desirable. Also, the agents are powerful and require special training for safe use. The same, however, may be said of X-rays. .

....2) Lack of knowledge of factors affecting the experience:Contrary to the belief of many investigators, the hallucinogens do not produce experiences but inhibit repressive mechanisms that ordinarily operate and simply allow subjects to explore the contents of their own minds. The nature of his exploration will depend on a) the mental content, the subject's individual personality, conditioning, attitudes, values and beliefs; :rolleyes: his preparation for the experience, which determines in part how he will use the opportunity; and c) his environment during the experience, which very appreciably affects how he will deal with the material he touches on and the opportunities afforded. Most investigators now agree that preparation and setting profoundly affect the subject's experience, and the presence of supportive, understanding, accepting companions is essential to a comfortable and rewarding session....

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,...1613675,00.html

When the Elite Loved LSD

By John Cloud Monday, Apr. 23, 2007

It's difficult to recall now, but there was a period 50 years ago when psychedelics were not only part of the mainstream but of the Establishment. Many academics and wealthy experimental types believed that the way psychedelics work — by expanding sensory awareness even as they disrupt control over the way you normally process information — would lead people to great insights. It didn't always turn out that way: some people had great insights; others ended up with not-so-great addictions.

But now that research into the therapeutic use of psychedelics has begun again, it's worth recalling that age when psychedelics were more elite drugs than "street" drugs.

As Robert Greenfield writes in last year's highly entertaining

Timothy Leary: A Biography, the term psychedelic was coined by a British psychiatrist, Humphry Osmond, who had ingested mescaline in 1951. "To fathom Hell or soar angelic, just take a pinch of psychedelic," he quipped, setting the expansive tone regarding the drugs that Leary would later popularize.

Osmond was close to Aldous Huxley, the novelist and fellow psychedelic enthusiast, and in the mid-'50s the two men met with a vice president from J.P. Morgan & Co., Gordon Wasson, who — in the racial and stilted language of the day — called himself and a photographer friend "the first white men in recorded history to eat the divine mushrooms." He meant psychedelic mushrooms, which Wasson had found in an Indian village in Mexico in 1955.

Wasson and his buddy's mushroom trip might have been lost to history, but he was so enraptured by the experience that on his return to New York, he kept talking about it to friends. As Jay Stevens recalls in his 1987 book Storming Heaven: LSD and the American Dream, one day during lunch at the Century Club, an editor at Time Inc. (the parent company of TIME) overheard Wasson's tale of adventure. The editor commissioned a first-person narrative for Life.

Reading the resulting piece — which Life published in its May 13, 1957, issue — is hilarious today. Wasson describes his hallucinations at great length, in reverent terms: "The visions were not blurred or uncertain. They were sharply focused. I felt that I was now seeing plain, whereas ordinary vision gives us an imperfect view; I was seeing the archetypes, the Platonic ideas, that underlie the imperfect images of everyday life." This is druggie talk — febrile and largely meaningless. That it was printed in Life magazine — the most influential publication of the day — without irony shows how na�ve we were. (Wasson in particular: he gave mushrooms to his 18-year-old daughter the day after his first trip.)

After Wasson's article was published, many people sought out mushrooms and the other big hallucinogen of the day, LSD. (In 1958, Time Inc. cofounder Henry Luce and his wife Clare Booth Luce dropped acid with a psychiatrist. Henry Luce conducted an imaginary symphony during his trip, according to Storming Heaven.) The most important person to discover drugs through the Life piece was Timothy Leary himself. Leary had never used drugs, but a friend recommended the article to him, and Leary eventually traveled to Mexico to take mushrooms. Within a few years, he had launched his crusade for America to "turn on, tune in, drop out." In other words, you can draw a woozy but vivid line from the sedate offices of J.P. Morgan and Time Inc. in the '50s to Haight-Ashbury in the '60s to a zillion drug-rehab c enters in the '70s. Long, strange trip indeed.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Jj8EAAAAM...son&f=false LIFE May 13, 1957 - Page 101

A New York Banker goes to Mexico's mountains to participate in the age-old rituals of Indians who chew strange growths that produce visions.

by R. Gordon Wasson

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/...,830527,00.html

Worship: Instant Mysticism

Friday, Oct. 25, 1963

.....In every age, men have struggled to perceive God directly rather than as a tenuously grasped abstraction. Few succeed, and the visions of the world's rare mystics have normally come only after hard spiritual work—prayer, meditation, ascetic practice. Now a number of psychologists and theologians are exploring such hallucinogenic drugs as mescaline, psilocybin and LSD-25 as an easy way to instant mysticism.

In large enough doses, these drugs can simulate the effects of certain forms of psychosis—to the point, in some cases, of permanent derangement. But in controlled, minute doses the drugs produce weird and wonderful fantasies of sight and feeling; in Greenwich Village and on college campuses, they seem to be replacing marijuana as the hip way to get kicks. Some investigators who have tried the drugs claim to have undergone a profound spiritual experience, and these men are seriously, if gingerly, studying the undefined relationship between drug-induced visions and the classic forms of mystical ecstasy....

.....Union With God. This kind of experience seems to be at least subjectively religious; but there are less convincing cases in which drug takers appear to have read religion into their visions or rigged the setting to induce a spiritual experience. One professor at a Protestant divinity school recalls that he was handed a rose to contemplate after taking his dose of LSD. "As I looked at the rose it began to glow," he said, "and suddenly I felt that I understood the rose. A few days later when I reread the Biblical account of Moses and the burning bush it suddenly made sense to me."

Selling LSD: Clare Boothe and Henry Luce and coverage of LSD in Time, 1954 - 1968

Page 2 of 32 - http://www.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa...2/p202932-2.php

...When J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings topped the paper back best seller list in 1966, Time noted that "the hobbit habit seems to be almost as catching as LSD." 4 In 1966, LSD was the focus of nine articles in Time, America's highest-circulation magazine at that time, including one titled "Mysticism in the Lab," which began: St. Paul was converted while riding on the road to Damascus by a sudden vision of the Risen Christ, who appeared to him in the form of a blinding light that struck him to the ground. Teresa of Avila, the 16 th Century saint, had poetic visions of "pure water running over crystal, the sun reflecting it and striking through it." Simone Weil, the lonely Jewish girl who turned into a Christian mystic, tells how the recitation of lines by George Herbert, such as, "Love bade me welcome, yet my soul drew back," acted on her intuitive conscious like prayer. "Then it happened," she recalled. "Christ himself came down, and he took me." Deep within myself. Most experiences of mystical consciousness ...

Page 28 of 32 http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p_mla_apa_.../p202932-28.php

......37 Clare Boothe Luce noted Heard's presence in journals of six LSD trips and discussed obtaining and using the drug in numerous correspondences. Heard was a remarkable figure. Born in London in 1889, he published the first of his thirty-one philosophical books in 1924. In 1937, he immigrated to the United States to for a brief stint as the head of Duke University's historical anthropology department. In 1939, Heard encountered Swarmi Prabhavananda in Hollywood and became a student of Vendanta, the Swami's sect of Hinduism. See Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2006. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center (Farmington Hills, Mich.: Thomson Gale, 2006), http://galenet.galeg...m/servlet/BioRC. 38 Gerald Heard, "Can This Drug Enlarge Man's Mind?" The Psychedelic Review, 1:1 (June 1963), 9. 39 Albin Krebs, "Clare Boothe Luce Dies at 84: Playwright, Politician, Envoy," New York Times, October 10, 1987. 40 Ibid. 41 Clare Boothe Luce kept a transcript of a conversation she held with her husband concerning this episode in their marriage and discussed her reaction in other personal writings. See "Conference between HRL and CBL," and "Imaginary interview," Clare Boothe Luce Collection, box 796, container 4, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 42 Swanberg, Luce and his Empire, 403. 43 She discussed her psychological state in a letter addressed to Heard but with instructions for him to pass it along to Cohen. See Letter to Gerald Heard, Dec. 20, 1959, Clare Boothe Luce Collection,, box 796, container 12, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 44 Ibid. During the March 11, 1959 trip Clare turned down a phone call from "Nixon," telling her aide that she would return the call later. Clare was active in the Republican party and served as national co-chair for Barry Goldwater's 1964 presidential run. See "Experiment with LSD 11 March 1959, Phoenix, Arizona," Clare Boothe Luce Collection, box 793, container 4, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 45 In her LSD journals, Luce typically listed those present with initials only. However, correspondence with both Murray and Heard confirms that they took LSD together. See letter from Gerald Heard dated February 13, 1960, Clare Boothe Luce Collection, box 766, ....

http://books.google.com/books?ei=-T6AS63DG...nG=Search+Books

Spread and perils of LSD.‎ - Page 28

Magazine - LIFE - Mar 25, 1966 - v. 60, no. 12 - 136 pages

A Remarkable Mind Drug he colorless, odorless, tasteless substance called LSD

can be made in any college chemistry lab. A black market dose costs only $3 to

lifelsd.jpg

http://www.bjp-onlin...tml?page=837770

4 February 2009

A trip down memory lane

Writer, photographer and filmmaker Lawrence Schiller has led a remarkable life since making his name shooting American icons of the 1960s. But, he tells, Lucy Davies, he got his big break shooting acid freaks - a story that opened the world's eyes to the pleasures and terrors of LSD...

....These were just some of the experiences recorded by photo-grapher Lawrence Schiller for Life magazine's 25 March 1966 issue. The story ran under the headline 'Turmoil in a capsule', and featured 20 or so images, of which two are on show as platinum prints at Asprey in London this month. They're the grubby cousins of Schiller's portraits of 1960s icons, which include a naked Marilyn posing by the pool, a revealing shot of political campaigning as RFK catches sleep during a plane tour, plus candid images of Paul Newman, Sophia Loren and Alfred Hitchcock, Terence Stamp, James Earl Jones and Lee Harvey Oswald, and which are now selling for upwards of £15,000.

Acid adventure

When the Life essay was published, LSD was still legal. Dr Albert Hofmann had discovered its psychoactive properties some 30 years previously, and ethically impaired British and American governments had conducted furtive tests on federal prisoners and dollar-hungry students. Whispers of its mind-expanding effects soon spread, and the drug emerged from laboratories into the rundown rooms of Haight Ashbury in San Francisco.

The psychedelic generation had already been primed for living free by their Beat predecessors, and figures such as erstwhile Harvard psychologist Timothy Leary loomed large, advocating the drug as a route to personal growth. He and Richard Alpert criss-crossed the American continent, extolling spiritual enlightenment. What started as a bohemian, intellectual exercise grew rapidly into a dangerous new fad, and in the same year that the Life article was published, Joan Didion described San Francisco as the place 'where the haemorrhaging of American society made itself felt'. The cringe-worthy adage states that if you remember the 1960s, you weren't really there, but fortunately Larry Schiller declined to join the ruckus and provided us with a rather more coherent account. He inspired Life to report on the pheno-menon, adamant they should pursue his story.

'It all began in Canter's late-night deli on Fairfax Boulevard,' he says. 'I was doing this small story on (Phil) Spector. Each night, after a session, he used to go in his limousine to Canter's for sandwiches. One night, we're all sitting in the restaurant and everyone seemed really stoned, on marijuana I guessed. Then one of the guys took a sugar cube, dropped it in his coffee, leaned over and said, "Boy, am I gonna have a trip". I didn't know, believe it or not, what he meant. But I was introduced that night to a whole roomful of people dropping acid.'

Intrigued, he went back several times. On one of these occasions he went with a young girl who was 'a little bit out of control' to an all night convenience store. 'She sat in the aisle looking at cereal, like cornflakes, transfixed by the coloured patterns on the boxes. She started freaking out, so I took her back to her apartment. I was introduced to her friends - groups of kids that got together in random rooms and had these psychedelic trips.'

Two days later, he went to Life. The editor was reluctant because, at that point, there was no scientific data on the drug, so Schiller walked down the hall and visited the Time office, urging its staff to run an article. His doggedness paid off and Time published a column probing the drug's medical effects. Schiller then marched back up the corridor with the article and landed himself a three-month investigation for Life with reporter Gerald Moore.

'I was ecstatic' he says. 'At the time, I was so frustrated: 300 assignments every year. I longed to be an essay journalist. I was 29 and it was an emotional moment in my life.'

Take a trip

He and Moore, an ex-policeman, started to integrate into the scene. At first, the kids were afraid: 'They admitted to using the drugs, but when it came to pictures and interviews they said no.' But one contact passed them on to the next until eventually they reached the people they had been searching for. 'There were some who had a sort of missionary quality,' says Schiller. 'They not only wanted to tell about their experiences; they seemed as though they had to.'

The trail led Schiller and Moore from Los Angeles to New York, and from Houston to Detroit, where they met Leary and Alpert, Laura Huxley, Billy Hitchcock and Ken Kesey. At Millbrook, the rambling mansion near Poughkeepsie that was Leary's Camelot, they encountered Owsley Stanley, the largest manufacturer of 'good, clean acid'. US agents described him as 'the man who did for LSD what Henry Ford did for the

motorcar', Leary as 'God's secret agent': either way, Luc Sante of The New York Times later described Millbrook as 'filled with endless parties, epiphanies and breakdowns, emotional dramas and numerous raids and arrests'.

Neither Schiller or Moore tried LSD during their investigation, and I wondered the photographer had ever been tempted. 'When I photographed good trips, where we all went into the woods and looked at the stars, yes, but I photographed bad trips too,' he says.

'People were losing their minds; terrified, screaming. And I wanted to remain objective. I wasn't investigating the experience of the drug; I was investigating the culture it had created.'

The fallout

The photographs take an equally balanced view, providing no answers, just a vivid depiction of the world of LSD. Moore would later add that he and Schiller found themselves 'feeling terribly protective about these people. We wanted to show they weren't just the antisocial fringe'.

At the end of their travels, Schiller gave Life 100 rolls of film. 'They lay it out, 10 pages and we've got this strong cover, a picture inside one of Kesey's Acid Tests, with strobe lights going off, and big lettering - L-S-D,' he says. 'It was a great, great cover. And then in walks the ad guy and says "What's LSD? Lowest sales denominator? You can't run that cover, I won't sell any ads".'

The cover that went to press was a rather more subdued affair - a photograph of a hand with coloured squares mapped onto the fingertips - but the fallout from the piece was spectacular. Life had asked, 'What are the police going to do?', and just seven months later its question was answered when LSD was outlawed in the US and all scientific research programmes on the drug shut down.

The amazing life of Lawrence Schiller

Brooklyn-born Lawrence Schiller began his photographic career as a teenager, and was hailed as 'A Pro at Sixteen' in US Camera after publishing in Sport magazine and The New York Times. His first photo was published in Life two years later in 1956, ....

I am the Egg man... Goo Goo ka Jube

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What harm is Timothy Leary? I don't care if he got a Ph.D. He's not a medical doctor. I would not eat a mushroom that wasn't checked by the FDA. Or take acid, when I've read of people throwing themselves out high windows while under the influence. I recall the tests the army did to its soldiers-volunteers, who were given LSD. They couldn't follow the drill -- turn left, turn right. Watching it made me sick. They're doing this to our soldiers.

I don't believe in the Georgetown wives taking LSD. I don't believe President Kennedy did either. I remember the shock when people learned that Cary Grant had done LSD with a psychiatrist. I don't know which was more shocking in those days -- taking LSD or going to a psychiatrist. Be careful eating mushrooms. If you get the wrong kind, it'll kill you in minutes. It totally shuts down the liver.

Kathy C

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  • 1 month later...

NATIONAL ENQUIRER (4th November, 2011)

The Kennedy clan is terrified over an upcoming book that promises to name the killer of JFKʼs White House mistress Mary Pinchot Meyer. Massachusetts author Peter Janney claims to have solved the mystery behind the murder of the 43-year-old socialite, who carried on a two year affair with President John F. Kennedy while he was in office.

While the Kennedy family is not implicated in the crime, they do not want to revisit sordid details of the past that

will be revealed in the book, noted the source. “Itʼs sure to open old wounds,” the source said about “Maryʼs Mosaic: Mary Pinchot Meyer & their Vision for World Peace.”

“The book will describe how JFK cheated on first lady Jackie – and then all the murky details of how gorgeous blonde Mary was killed almost a year after his assassination.”

Incredibly, The ENQUIRER was the FIRST to break the news of the steamy relationship in our March 2, 1976, issue, and our scoop inspired author Janney.

“I have been researching her story since The ENQUIRER story first broke in 1976,” Janney admitted.

The affair included almost 30 “trysts,” and itʼs been reported that Mary brought marijuana or the mind-altering drug LSD for the sexual encounters.

On Oct. 12, 1964, 11 months after the Kennedy assassination, and two weeks after the Warren Commission report on his death was made public, Mary was shot to death while out for a walk in Washington.

A man named Raymond Crump was arrested, but the gun used in the shooting was never located and Crump was acquitted of all charges. The murder has remained unsolved ever since.

“Janneyʼs book will finally uncover the CIAʼs suspected role in Maryʼs death and will drop other bombshells,” said the source. “The Kennedys are bracing for the disclosures.”

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Journalist and author Zalin Grant re-investigated the murder of Mary Meyer beginning in November of 1993.

You can find his fresh take on the case in his article MARY MEYER: A HIGHLY SUSPICIOUS DEATH - Did Camelot Get Away With Murder? at his always informative site, Zalin Grant's War Tales.

As he did with his investigation of former DCI William E. Colby's suspicious death in 1996, Grant visited the scene, scoured police files, and interviewed witnesses (including acquitted suspect Raymond Crump Jr's attorney, Dovey Roundtree).

Most disturbing is what Grant found when he sought out the original physical evidence in the Mary Meyer homicide file in D.C.

Article link: http://www.pythiapress.com/wartales/Meyer.html

Zalin Grant's website: http://www.pythiapress.com/wartales/colby.htm

-- Steve

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Journalist and author Zalin Grant re-investigated the murder of Mary Meyer beginning in November of 1993.

You can find his fresh take on the case in his article MARY MEYER: A HIGHLY SUSPICIOUS DEATH - Did Camelot Get Away With Murder? at his always informative site, Zalin Grant's War Tales.

As he did with his investigation of former DCI William E. Colby's suspicious death in 1996, Grant visited the scene, scoured police files, and interviewed witnesses (including acquitted suspect Raymond Crump Jr's attorney, Dovey Roundtree).

Most disturbing is what Grant found when he sought out the original physical evidence in the Mary Meyer homicide file in D.C.

Article link: http://www.pythiapress.com/wartales/Meyer.html

Zalin Grant's website: http://www.pythiapress.com/wartales/colby.htm

-- Steve

Interesting article. Zalin Grant says:

Raymond Crump, Jr, age 25, an African American, was taken by police when he was found in the canal towpath area a few minutes after Mary Meyer was killed. A witness said he saw a black man near the body of Ms. Meyer shortly after he heard the two shots. He identified the man he saw as being five-eight and 185 pounds. Crump was five foot five and a half inches tall and weighed 145 pounds.

The D.C. police took Ray Crump into custody and he was charged with the first degree murder of Mary Meyer. As the trial revealed, there was no physical evidence—no blood, no hairs, no fibers—nothing that linked Crump to her murder. No eyewitness claimed to have seen the killing. The gun was never found.

Alfred Hantman, the assistant U.S. Attorney charged with prosecuting the case, told the judge and jury on the first morning of the trial in July 1965:

“This case in all its aspects is a classic textbook case in circumstantial evidence.”

Actually it was a classic textbook case on how to frame a black man for a murder he didn’t commit—something that had already taken place more than a few times in American history.

And the frame-up would have succeeded had it not been for the presence of an African American lawyer by the name of Dovey Roundtree.

Despite this, Nina Burleigh, the author of "A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer", says that Crump was probably guilty of the crime. Of course, she used to work for Ben Bradlee, who played an important role with Angleton in the cover-up.

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What harm is Timothy Leary? I don't care if he got a Ph.D. He's not a medical doctor. I would not eat a mushroom that wasn't checked by the FDA. Or take acid, when I've read of people throwing themselves out high windows while under the influence. I recall the tests the army did to its soldiers-volunteers, who were given LSD. They couldn't follow the drill -- turn left, turn right. Watching it made me sick. They're doing this to our soldiers.

I don't believe in the Georgetown wives taking LSD. I don't believe President Kennedy did either. I remember the shock when people learned that Cary Grant had done LSD with a psychiatrist. I don't know which was more shocking in those days -- taking LSD or going to a psychiatrist. Be careful eating mushrooms. If you get the wrong kind, it'll kill you in minutes. It totally shuts down the liver.

Kathy C

LSD never went away. They just make it at lower dosages and you're far more likely to hear about kids binge drinking themselves to death than flying out windows on LSD. It's popular in dance clubs, so I'm told.

Steve Jobs dropped acid. Spoke well of the experience. He even insisted that Bill Gates would benefit from an acid trip.

The high-dose LSD going around in the 60's was dangerous because people needed to be emotionally balanced going into the trip in order to have a good time.

Did the CIA conduct a grand social experiment by pushing a dangerous drug upon the youth of America which rendered them docile?

You bet. The name of that drug -- heroin. Heroin makes people docile. LSD does not.

Edited by Cliff Varnell
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Tom's point about the change in the way LSD was perceived is very important, and is born out by the book called Storming Heaven: The Social History of LSD.

Some may have a wish to protect JFK from the stigma of the associations of LSD that were propagated from 1966 on. These are simply not the associations that accompanied the drug in 1963.

Now, can we expect today's Corporate Media to respect these distinctions if this book makes waves? Of course not. Does that mean we should let that distract us from other questions of what actually happened in 1963? Of course not.

I am sensitive to all the trembling earth there is out there in the Okefenokee swamp of JFK disinfo. There is tons of stuff out there planted as banana peel so the cameras can run only in the slipping. So I am far from saying we should lead with the Mary Pinchot Meyer, until much more research is done.

But I guess I don't understand how some are so quick to dismiss this. I mean lets just focus on the Ben Bradlee and Angleton aspects of the story for a minute.

Are they on the same page in so far as how they tell the story?

If they are, then how can this not be a story, even if both are lying? I mean this is the editor of Watergate. It would seem that one way or another there is some There here. I mean even if you think both are cooperating to cover something else up?

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Or maybe you and John do not know just how bad Bradlee is. In addition to the disifno on MM and JFK, at the time of the HSCA concluding, Tony Summers called him up. Summers told him that he should look into the whole Phillips/Veciana/Bishop angle. Bradlee called in an intern named David Leigh and told him to look into it. But he then added that he wanted him to try and discredit the story! (With friends like DIck Helms, of course.)

Well Leigh said that he came back a couple of weeks later and told Ben something he did not want to hear: He could not discredit it. It looked like it was true to him. Bradlee was pissed. So he killed the story.

So please, do not tell me about any wondrous interviews decades later between Janney and Mr. Cover Up. Recall, it was Bradlee who was editor when the Post printed the editorial about the two assassins in Dealey Plaza who did not know each other.

If you had read my page on Ben Bradlee you will see how I have argued that he has been a CIA disinformation agent since the early days of the organisation. In 1952 Bradlee joined the staff of the Office of U.S. Information and Educational Exchange (USIE), the embassy's propaganda unit. USIE produced films, magazines, research, speeches, and news items for use by the the CIA throughout Europe. USIE (later known as USIA) also controlled the Voice of America, a means of disseminating pro-American "cultural information" worldwide. While at the USIE Bradlee worked with E. Howard Hunt and Alfred Friendly.

According to a Justice Department memo from a assistant U.S. attorney in the Rosenberg Trial Bradlee was helping the CIA to manage European propaganda regarding the spying conviction and the execution of Ethel Rosenberg and Julius Rosenberg on on 19th June, 1953.

Janney, like others who have researched this case, have pointed out that Bradlee lied in court during the trial of Raymond Crump about the way he found out about the death of Mary Pinchot Meyer. This is important because Bradlee knew about her death before she had been identified by the police. So did Cord Meyer. Both men were told about Meyer's death by the same senior CIA official.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKbradleeB.htm

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  • 4 months later...

This review is from: Mary's Mosaic: The CIA Conspiracy to Murder John F. Kennedy, Mary Pinchot Meyer, and Their Vision of World Peace (Hardcover)

Written by Douglas P. Horne, author of "Inside the Assassination Records Review Board"

"Mary's Mosaic" is several things at once: an insightful and sensitive biography of both Mary Meyer and her one-time husband, CIA propaganda specialist Cord Meyer; a murder mystery; a trial drama; an expose of secret knowledge and cover-ups inside the Washington D.C. Beltway during the 1950s and 1960s; and of course, a love story about the late-developing relationship between President John F. Kennedy and Mary Pinchot Meyer, whom he had first met at an Ivy League prep school dance when she was only 15 years old. Their paths had crossed briefly once again in the Spring of 1945, at the founding conference for the United Nations in San Francisco. (Mary, her new husband Cord Meyer, and John F. Kennedy all attended the conference as journalists reporting on the events there, at the birth of the United Nations.)

One of the fascinating aspects of this well-researched book is how it traces the evolution and personal development of Mary Pinchot Meyer, Cord Meyer, and John F. Kennedy. As Cord Meyer---a scarred war hero who was once an idealist and a pacifist, and who aggressively lobbied for a united world government following World War II---became a disillusioned cynic and was subverted to the "dark side" by Allen Dulles of the CIA, his all-consuming commitment to the Cold War (and his abandonment of his former idealism) slowly killed his marriage to Mary Pinchot. Mary remained an idealist and an independent thinker, and it was this very independent and unconventional woman whose orbit finally intersected with that of President John F. Kennedy again late in 1961, about two years before his assassination.

Janney convincingly documents how their relationship became much more than a series of mere sexual trysts---it became a personal and political alliance of two people who had become thoroughly convinced of the insanity of war between nation states in the Nuclear Age, and who were both determined to do something about it. Jack Kennedy, already sickened by war and skeptical about the wisdom of senior military officers because of his World War II experiences, had become even more skeptical about the desire of many to seek simplistic, military solutions to complex international problems following the bad advice he received from the Joint Chiefs of Staff about the Bay of Pigs and Laos in 1961. After the searing crucible of the Cuban Missile Crisis in the fall of 1962, JFK embarked upon a program of moral action not only in civil rights, but undertook bold efforts to begin to end the Cold War; to commence a withdrawal from Vietnam which would have been completed by the end of 1965; and behind the backs of the Pentagon and the CIA, embarked upon what he thought was a clandestine rapprochment with Fidel Castro's Cuba. Mary Pinchot Meyer, who had ever been critical and distrustful of the CIA, became a natural ally of President Kennedy's throughout 1963 as he moved to curb the unbridled power of the Agency and defuse the Cold War. (She was present at the "Peace Speech" at American University on June 10, 1963, and Jackie Kennedy was not.) One of Janney's most convincing sources about the nature of the relationship between Mary Meyer and Jack Kennedy was an extremely well-placed official with intimate knowledge of JFK's daily activities and thinking: Kennedy's Presidential Appointments Secretary, Kenneth O'Donnell. Janney used O'Donnell's oral history interview with the late author Leo Damore, recorded years ago shortly before O'Donnell's death, as one of the foundations for his book.

For those who revel in study of the Cold War culture in Washington in this era, the book is full of well-documented revelations about Phil and Katherine Graham of the Washington Post; James Jesus Angleton (the Head of CIA Counterintelligence), who was godfather to the children of Cord and Mary Meyer; and Ben Bradlee, editor of the Washington Post during the Watergate era (who is exposed in the book as one of the CIA's major media assets). In my view, knowing that Bradlee was in the CIA's pocket helps explain why the Washington Post was so successful in taking down Richard Nixon following the Watergate break-in. Nixon had used his Chief of Staff, Haldemann, to attempt to get the CIA to "warn off" the FBI in its investigation of the Watergate break-in and the "plumbers." Nixon instructed Haldemann to threaten the CIA (Richard Helms) with exposure of its involvement in the JFK assassination, as an incentive for the Agency to cooperate with him. This "hardball" leverage failed, and Bradlee was allowed (and perhaps encouraged) to take down Nixon. He acted as the CIA wished in the Watergate matter. Unaccountably, Bradlee never employed the considerable investigative resources of the Post to look into the Kennedy assassination...well, perhaps that is not so "unaccountable" after all, now that we know he had been a CIA asset since the early 1950s, a part of the Agency's remarkably successful penetration and control of foreign and domestic media. As Janney reveals, Cord Meyer (Mary's husband from 1945 until the late 1950s) was in charge of that CIA program of media penetration and propaganda, and Ben Bradlee was married to Mary Pinchot's sister, Toni. The proximity of these relationships---between Cord Meyer, James Angleton, and Bradlee---make it easy to believe that Bradlee's links with the CIA, that began in the early 1950s, continued into the 1960s and early 1970s, when he was in powerful positions at Newsweek and the Washington Post.

Peter Janney's own father, a World War II Naval aviator and a recipient of the Navy Cross, was also a CIA man, and Peter grew up amidst the CIA culture in Washington. Mary Meyer's son Michael was his best childhood friend. He knew Mary Meyer as his best friend's mother. He was therefore perfectly placed to write this book, for his own family had frequent social contacts with Cord and Mary Meyer, James Angleton, Richard Helms, Tracy Barnes, Desmond FitzGerald, and William Colby. Janney's knowledge of the CIA Cold War culture in our nation's capital in the 1950s and 1960s is very well-informed, on a personal level.

Janney compellingly relates how the D.C. metropolitan police and the U.S. Justice Department attempted to railroad an innocent black man, Ray Crump, for the mysterious murder of Mary Meyer in October of 1964, just three weeks after the Warren Report was issued. Due to the heroic efforts of African American female attorney Dovey Roundtree, Janney explains how against all odds, Crump was acquitted. Peter Janney reveals the likely motive for her murder---she was about to publicly oppose the sham conclusions of the Warren Report as a fraud. Furthermore, she had kept a private diary which presumably recorded details of her relationship with President Kennedy (and perhaps even of affairs of state). In October of 1964, she was literally "the woman who knew too much." This book reveals the numerous lies and falsehoods told about her diary (and its disposition) by Ben Bradlee, James Jesus Angleton, and others, in a way not adequately covered by previous articles and books. The media in this country, misled by the CIA and by former acquaintances of Meyer's who had much to hide, has consistently distorted the true story of what likely happened to her diary, and Peter Janney lays all of this out in a way that anyone can understand.

Peter Janney also solves the mystery of her murder 48 years ago, in as convincing a fashion as one can, so many years later. Many have asked, "If Ray Crump did not kill Mary Meyer, then who did?" This book answers that question. (I will not provide any spoilers here.)

So purchase a copy of this book today. Extensively footnoted and persuasively written, it is the best account in print about the life and death of Mary Meyer, easily eclipsing the sole biography previously written about her by Nina Burleigh. Peter Janney has courageously finished the investigative journey into her life and death begun by the late Leo Damore, and briefly resumed (and then abandoned) by John H. Davis. "Mary's Mosaic" is part film noir thriller, part biography, and also provides a remarkably frank view of the Cold War culture in Washington, and the dark side of the national security state. It belongs on the bookshelf of every Cold War historian, and everyone who is interested in President Kennedy's assassination.

http://www.amazon.com/Marys-Mosaic-Conspiracy-Kennedy-Pinchot/dp/1616087080/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

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From thedailybeast.com

The Mysterious Murder of Mary Pinchot Meyer—Revisited

by Nina Burleigh

Apr 2, 2012

"Mary's Mosaic, a new book about the socialite, artist, and close friend of John F. Kennedy, claims that her death was a CIA conspiracy. Writer Nina Burleigh disagrees."

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/04/02/the-mysterious-murder-of-mary-pinchot-meyer-revisited.html

Edited by Michael Hogan
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