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Paul, I've asked before that you show some direct connection between Morales and New Orleans and as I recall you referenced Joan Mellon' book. Could you give us something specific putting him in New Orleans, in contact with Bannister etc. Or could you show when and where he cane into contact with a Walker plot. Thanks to a lot of diligent work over the years we have a reasonably good picture of where and what Morales was doing in 1963. Everyone knows I believe that Morales was fully capable of going on his own and he did have people he trusted who could have influenced him. People he had been working with on assassinating Castro for example. But I know of nothing that would connect him to Bannister, Walker and a civilian plot already in progress....does Caufield's book connect Morales and if so please lay that out for us.

Larry, the connection between David Morales and Guy Banister -- as I surmise based on the works of the Lopez Report, Joan Mellen and Bill Simpich -- is threefold.

(1) Joan Mellen says (Farewell to Justice, 2005) that at a secret August 1963 meeting in New Orleans (at Carlos Marcello[s Town and Country Motel) Thomas Beckham heard Guy Banister, Clay Shaw, David Ferrie and others speaking about the problem of JFK trying to broach a secret deal with Fidel Castro. The problem, says Mellen, is that at this moment in time, only the CIA knew about this secret deal. David Morales was working for the CIA Cuba Desk at the time, and would have known about it.

(2) Bill Simpich says (State Secret, 2014) that David Morales is his suspect for the Mole who IMPERSONATED Lee Harvey Oswald in Mexico City, by calling the USSR Embassy from the heavily tapped telephone at the Cuban Consulate there, claiming to be LHO and asking for KGB Agent Valerie Kostikov -- an assassinations expert. The CIA started a Mole-Hunt seeking the IMPERSONATOR, and never found him.

(3) The Lopez Report confirms that LHO was in Mexico City with a bogus resume naming him a bogus Director of a bogus FPCC in New Orleans, which was in reality run by Guy Banister.

THEREFORE -- my logic is that David Morales knew that LHO would come to Mexico City with the bogus Resume, pretending to be a Communist, and file it with the Mexico City Consulate, and then Morales added to Guy Banister's plot to set-up LHO by linking LHO's name with a wanted KGB Agent.

By linking Morales and Banister in Mexico City in this way, this allows me to link Morales and Banister at the Town and Country Motel.

Even if David Morales was not actually at the Town and Country Motel himself, yet Morales was responsible for "leaking" the secret CIA information about JFK's planned secret deal with Fidel Castro.

I think my logic is solid enough to warrant further research.

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

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Paul, we can all sketch out scenarios with logic, no doubt about that. I will say, and you know from my book, that there were rumors circulating about the JFK/Castro contacts in Miami, being carried by Cuban exiles that are named and certainly not connected to the logic you laid out. The CIA had known about Castro's outreach since Spring and it had definitely circulated down to Miami by August, spreading into select exile circles from there. Certainly by those rumors could have been making it back to New Orleans in a variety of ways. As far as I can recall Beckham never brought up anything of that nature in his statements in the Grand Jury inquiry or to the HSCA. You might want to check that; I'm afraid Mr. Beckham has added to his story a good bit over time so all I can do, as I did to Joan, is recommend caution on him as a source.

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Well Paul - prove it. You don't have a scintilla of evidence.

We know who Morales was and who he worked for, and it wasn't Banister. There is a lifetime of proof that he was high level operational CIA. Simpich did not prove that Morales went out of his chain of command, he only surmised that it might have been him. He also did not rule out DAP. And since deniability is the name of the CIA operational game, a mole hunt doesn't actually prove that the hunters were in the dark. It might, or it might be a cover. The only thing we know for sure is that Oswald was impersonated on multiple occasions during the time he was supposed to be in MC. We cannot prove more than that.

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Well Paul - prove it. You don't have a scintilla of evidence.

We know who Morales was and who he worked for, and it wasn't Banister. There is a lifetime of proof that he was high level operational CIA. Simpich did not prove that Morales went out of his chain of command, he only surmised that it might have been him. He also did not rule out DAP. And since deniability is the name of the CIA operational game, a mole hunt doesn't actually prove that the hunters were in the dark. It might, or it might be a cover. The only thing we know for sure is that Oswald was impersonated on multiple occasions during the time he was supposed to be in MC. We cannot prove more than that.

As I said, Paul B., it wasn't me, it was Bill Simpich who implicated David Morales in the IMPERSONATION of LHO in Mexico City.

Since that was done only ONE DAY after LHO had failed to enter Cuba through Mexico City using his Fake Resume of a Fake FPCC and a Fake Communist, working from 544 Camp Street, then the Mexico City trip by LHO and the Mexico City IMPERSONATION by David Morales are both linked to Guy Banister in that way. That's my theory and I'm sticking to it until somebody shows me strong evidence to the contrary.

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

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Anyway, let's get back to the theme of the current thread, namely, the new book by Jeff Caufield.

Proceeding further into Jeffrey Caufield's new book, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical Right Conspiracy, Chapter 12, General Walker and the Military Muzzling, 1961, we begin by encountering General Walker in Augsburg, Germany in early 1960, when he was getting started in his command in Germany.

General Walker was also gay. In the great freedom of a US General in Europe in 1960, he would spend his spare time away from the Army base, away from other officers and their wives, and he almost never attended any officer’s functions. This, of course, was noticed quickly by other officers and also by the local Army newspaper, the Overseas Weekly.

Reporters from the Overseas Weekly began to spy on General Walker. They followed him when he left the Army base. They snuck into his office to find clues. Walker complained about them frequently, and even took them to Civil court in Germany, and won his case. Walker hated them, and they learned to hate General Walker.

The Troops however, tended to love General Walker. He was firm and decisive, and he insisted on traditional values and energetic military discipline. Under his command, the 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany won multiple awards for sharpshooting and merit. Walker also instituted his own training program, partly inspired by the JBS, named, “Pro-Blue” in which he recommended a very conservative reading list for soldiers, and also flew in speakers for mass meetings for his soldiers and their families -- speakers from the JBS roster.

Walker’s “cover” for his free time was that he was undergoing medical examinations for a possible brain tumor. There was no medical evidence that Walker ever had a brain tumor, but the Overseas Weekly continued to spy on him. In any case, Walker demanded that one reporter in particular be fired by the Overseas Weekly editors, and they laughed in his face. Generals don’t control the Press. So General Walker chose to sue them again, but this time, the Overseas Weekly just tore into General Walker as with no other General in US history.

On April 17, 1961, the Overseas Weekly newspaper was basically dedicated to tearing General Walker apart. (They wouldn’t say anything about Walker being gay – these were the old days when high officials like JFK could get away with sexual escapades of every kind, and the Press would say nothing about it.) Instead, this newspaper attacked General Walker’s membership in the John Birch Society, and they emphasized that the JBS had called various US Presidents Communist – such as FDR, Harry Truman, Ike and JFK. General Walker himself had even called President Truman and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, “definitely pink” while addressing his own troops.

A scandal erupted in Europe unlike anything the Cold War had ever seen. Even before the news hit the White House, the General Staff in Europe decided to remove Walker from his Command that very same day. The worry wasn’t that Walker was gay, or even that he was a member of the JBS and brought their speakers to speak to his Troops. Instead, the worry of the US Generals in Europe was that General Walker failed to play nice with the Press, and so more and more scandals would emerge as the months went forward. The Cold War was a very sensitive time for propaganda on both sides – and so General Walker was reassigned to a desk job “elsewhere” with no Troops to Command, that very same day.

There is a common myth that JFK “fired” General Walker because of his JBS affiliation. That’s incorrect. JFK actually wanted to retain General Walker, to avoid further scandal, and even offered General Walker another post in Hawaii, also to conduct Military Training! JFK and McNamara merely gave Walker a mild “admonishment,” and praised Walker officially. So, actually, General Walker was never “fired” from the US Army, by JFK or anybody else. Just as Walker had resigned under President Eisenhower (who denied the resignation), so General Walker simply re-submitted his resignation under JFK, in November 1961.

That said, we admit that Walker was surely removed from his command in Germany, and this was during the JFK administration, so in shorthand one could say that Walker was “fired by JFK.” But that’s not precisely the way it happened. JFK was sorry to see the scandal of Walker resigning and giving up his Army pension, but JFK accepted his resignation. Anyway, this made General Walker the only US General to resign in the 20th century, thereby forfeiting his Army pension after 30 years of service. Jeffrey Caufield writes of this history-making move, starting with Walker's mother:

Mrs. Walker…stated that on Friday, Mr. Courtney from the Independent American had …told her his plan was “to put Gen. Walker on a salary plus commission for speaking engagements all over the country to combat the election of liberals wherever they might be up for reelection and defeat them with conservatives. Courtney said one reason he came over here was to get George to introduce him to you by phone, that he and Gen. Willoughby planned to go to Germany to see you, next week.” (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 319)

General Willoughby was an interesting guy. He was General Douglas MacArthur's aide during World War 2, and also MacArthur's gifted biographer, and when Harry Truman fired MacArthur for insubordination in Korea, Willoughby accused Harry Truman of being a Communist. It was a common mythology in the 1950's. In any case, the 1961 resignation of General Walker and his quick pick-up by the Radical Right in the USA was only the beginning of the scandal that was to become known as “Military Muzzling.”

(to be continued)

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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You don't have a scintilla of evidence that Banister and Morales were acquainted, much less in cahoots.

Nor did I say I had any proof at all, Paul B. I said it was my own theory.

The sources for my EDUCATED GUESS are Joan Mellen, Bill SImpich and the Lopez Report. Good sources.

My claim isn't in Jeff Caufield's book, however. Let's just get back to talking about Jeff Caufield's new book.

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

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Proceeding further into Jeffrey Caufield's new book, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical Right Conspiracy, Chapter 12, General Walker and the Military Muzzling, 1961, we now encounter General Walker back in the USA, and more popular than ever before. Caufield writes:

In 1961, Kent Courtney and his wife Phoebe published the book, The Case of General Edwin A. Walker, The Muzzling of the Military Who Warn of the Communist Threat. …The book was more of a broadside against the Kennedy administration and less about the “muzzling” case of Walker. (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 322)

The removal of General Walker from his command in Germany in 1961 became a political football in 1961. This book by the Courtneys openly called for General Walker for US President in the forthcoming 1964 election. The visibility of Ex-General Walker was at an all-time high, and Newsweek magazine even put General Walker on its front cover. http://www.pet880.com/images/19611204_Newsweek_Cover.JPG

At this time, also Ex-General Walker began writing and copyrighting six speeches that he would begin delivering throughout the South. Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas and Southern California were his principal audiences. According to some reports, Walker received standing ovations every five minutes, and a thundering five-minute ovation at the end of every speech. When speaking to True Believers, Edwin Walker could do no wrong.

Also, segregationist Reverend Billy James Hargis contracted segregationist Senators Strom Thurmond, James Eastland and John Stennis, and demanded a Congressional hearing on “the case of General Walker.” Caufield writes:

On January 24, 1962, Strom Thurmond began Senate hearings to investigate Pentagon troop indoctrination and the “muzzling” practices of the military in a special subcommittee of the Armed Services Committee with Senator John Stennis as a chairman. Thurmond claimed the “muzzling” was an example of a U.S. “no win” policy that kept them from winning the Cold War. Thurmond charged that the Pentagon was “muzzling” military leaders because they spoke out against Communism. (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 323)

Walker’s speeches were so well-received by the segregationist Right coast to coast, that one is reminded of the fictional figure of General James Matoon Scott (played by Burt Lancaster) in the 1964 film, Seven Days in May. "General Scott:" was a fictional rightist General who gave speeches at stadiums to sold-out, fanatical crowds. In any case, Walker was so encouraged by his reception coast-to-coast that by early 1962 Walker decided to run for the office of the Governor of Texas. Only from such a springboard could he then enter the race for US President.

While preparing for the May, 1962 elections in Texas, Ex-General Walker also prepared to appear as a witness before the Senate Subcommittee on Military Preparedness, scheduled for April 1962.

(to be continued)

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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Proceeding further into Jeffrey Caufield's new book, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical Right Conspiracy, Chapter 12, General Walker and the Military Muzzling, 1961, we now encounter General Walker facing the Senate Subcommittee on Military Preparedness of April 1962.

The Subcommittee was first organized to review the removal of General Walker from his command over the 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany. It was subsequently modified to include a wider scope, for example, the future of Army Training in general.

When Walker came to Washington DC in April 1962 to face the Senate regarding his allegedly unfair removal from his post, supported by friendly Senators Strom Thurmond, John Stennis and James Eastland, Walker was flying high from a string of public speaking tours in the South in which his audiences had given him countless, thundering, standing ovations. He was beloved by the Right wing in the USA. His picture had made the cover of Newsweek magazine. He was a viable candidate for higher office, said many people. Walker entered the Senate room in high spirits.

JFK and RFK became so worried about the rising popularity of Edwin Walker that they requested that no TV or radio be allowed in the Senate Subcommittee hearings, lest Walker gain a political foothold too big for them to handle.

However, during the course of the Senate Subcommittee hearings, the world saw a completely different picture of Ex-General Walker. Walker was considered a great speaker by his fans, that is, when he was preaching to the converted. However, Walker had no experience in cross-examination, and when he was speaking with a skeptical audience, he lost his temper, flustered, blustered, hesitated, turned to his attorneys for long periods, and generally lost his cool.

In the course of the hearings, Ex-General Walker defended his role in Germany mainly by a long, boring series of attacks on the Overseas Weekly newspaper. They should not be allowed to exist, he exclaimed! They are subversive! Why does the Pentagon prefer this pinko newspaper to the JBS American Opinion, he demanded! He named names and told long stories about his conflicts with the Overseas Weekly newspaper, and generally put his audience to sleep.

Under cross-examination he lost his place and his temper. When one reporter in the hall pointed this out to him, Walker punched him in the eye. Another reporter quipped, “By the grace of God, he is the worst speaker in the world.” JFK and RFK then wished they had allowed TV and radio into the hearings after all. Caufield writes:

Walker presented himself poorly at the two-day hearing, misinterpreting the facts and at times rambling incoherently. His hands shook and he frequently stumbled over words…After the hearing, the conservative National Review changed their tune and described Walker’s testimony as “pitiful” and that Walker was “consigned to history’s trash can.” (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 325)

At the end of the hearings, the so-called “Military Muzzling” turned out to be nothing more than Ex-General Walker’s conflict with the Overseas Weekly newspaper. There were many rightist Americans who had expected to see the emergence of a new Eugene McCarthy, or even a new Douglas MacArthur from these Senate Subcommittee hearings -- and they were flatly disappointed. In the following month, May 1963, Walker came in last place in the election for Texas Governor. Walker was now fated to giving segregationist speeches in the South for the rest of his life – until history would once more throw him into the limelight.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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Your theory, My theory, DiEugenios theory, Caulfield's theory, whatever. Cold hard provable facts is what you ask for, yet never supply. So just admit it and I'll get off your thread!!!

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Your theory, My theory, DiEugenios theory, Caulfield's theory, whatever. Cold hard provable facts is what you ask for, yet never supply. So just admit it and I'll get off your thread!!!

So, you're threatening to just be a nuisance on this thread, without contributing anything positive?

News flash, Paul B., this isn't my thread. It was started by William O'Neil.

Sincerely,

--Paul Trejo

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Let us proceed into the next chapter of Jeffrey Caufield's new book, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical Right Conspiracy, Chapter 13, General Walker 1962: The Road to Insurrection at Ole Miss.

Let's review: General Walker sprang into the public news in 1957 with the Little Rock High School race integration riots by leading Federal Troops to keep the peace and enforce the Brown Decision. Walker served honorably, under protest. However, in late 1959 Walker joined the JBS when he became convinced that President Eisenhower was actually a Communist traitor to the USA. Walker submitted his resignation to the US Army after 28 years of loyal service.

Eisenhower ripped up the resignation and gave Walker a command over 10,000 Troops in Augsburg, Germany, and Walker accepted the deal. Once in Germany, however, Walker clashed head-on with the Overseas Weekly newspaper there, and sued them in civil court, until they ripped Walker apart in their April 17th 1961 issue. The Pentagon pushed Walker off of his command for causing a military scandal during the Cold War, and JFK offered Walker a post in Hawaii. Walker just re-submitted his resignation in late 1961, and this time JFK accepted it.

Once a civilian, Walker entered politics with the help of H.L. Hunt. Walker became a successful public speaker at segregation rallies, and ran for Texas Governor. Also, Republicans in the Senate hoped to embarrass the Democrats by rubbing their noses in the scandal of Walker’s resignation, by using the Senate Subcommittee on Military Preparedness of April 1962.

Unfortunately for the Republicans, Ex-General Walker made a fool of himself at those hearings, and then he soundly lost the elections for Texas Governor. Walker was reduced to making segregation speeches in the South – until September 1962.

As the Cuban Missile Crisis raged on, a Black American, James Meredith, insisted on registering at the all-white Ole Miss University, contrary to the pleas of Governor Ross Barnett, who threatened to call on the State Police to prevent James Meredith from registering. JFK responded by threatening to send thousands of Federal Troops to Ole Miss in September 1962, just as President Eisenhower had sent thousands of Federal Troops to Little Rock High School in September 1957.

On September 1, 1963, Ex-General Walker wrote to Kent Courtney, saying, “If Kennedy wins this one, it may be the critical issue of the century.” Walker went on radio and television to call for “ten-thousand strong from every State in the Union” to travel to Mississippi to join Governor Barnett and confront the Federal Troops if JFK dared to send them. Walker and his people were convinced that JFK would back down. JFK did not back down, and he mobilized thousands of Federal Troops to Mississippi. Caufield writes:

Referring to his role in enforcing integration at Little Rock in 1957 with the 101st Airborne, Walker stated, “The last time I was on the wrong side. This time I am on the right side and I will be there.” …That same evening, Guy Banister’s close associate, Louis P. Davis sent Walker a telegram pledging “ten thousand from Louisiana alone under your command.” (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 353)

On the night before Walker drove to Mississippi, he published an open letter to JFK, attacking not so much the Ole Miss issue, but JFK’s alleged weakness in the Cuban Missile Crisis. Here is that open letter: http://www.pet880.com/images/19620926_EAW_Open_Letter.JPG

To make a very long story very short, Minutemen and Klansmen and sundry rightists from all over the USA drove to Mississippi to confront JFK’s Federal Troops. even though Federal Troops confiscated firearms at the border. On the evening of 30 September 1963 a riot ignited that kept flaring up until 2am. Thousands of civilians clashed with thousands of Federal Troops. Hundreds were wounded and two were killed.

To this day, film footage of the Ole Miss riot is protected from public viewing by FOIA exceptions at NARA. It remains very much an open political wound, more than a half-century later. This open wound rests at the center of the JFK assassination – and even more precisely at the center of the attempted assassination of General Walker in April 1963.

(to be continued)

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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Proceeding further into Jeffrey Caufield's new book, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical Right Conspiracy, Chapter 13, General Walker 1962: The Road to Insurrection at Ole Miss, we learn of the aftermath of the Ole Miss riots of 1962.

In brief, the US Federal Troops won the day, and James Meredith successfully registered at Ole Miss University, and obtained the full-time services of two Federal officers who were to accompany him from class to class until he graduated. As for Ex-General Walker, although JFK and RFK had the right to arrest him for insurrection, they chose instead to send Walker to the Springfield Military Hospital for the Mentally Ill for a 90-day psychiatric evaluation.

This was arguably a serious blunder on the part of JFK, because it was mixing politics with psychiatry – a pernicious practice that only Communists were known to do. The ACLU sprang into action on the side of the Radical Right, along with psychiatrist Thomas Szasz, and in only three days, Walker was back on the street with all but an apology.

Walker agreed to see a psychiatrist on his own time, and to return to Mississippi in December to face a Grand Jury hearing. Here is a photograph of Edwin Walker upon his return to Love Field airport in Dallas on 4 October 1962. Notice what appears to be tear-gas ashes on the sleeve of his jacket, as well as a Confederate flag above his head, as well as posters calling for his Presidency in the forthcoming 1964 elections. http://www.dallasnews.com/news/jfk50/explore/20130511-before-gunning-for-jfk-oswald-targeted-ex-gen.-edwin-a.-walker--and-missed.ece

After Walker was back in Dallas and the dust settled, General Walker had to travel to Mississippi to face a Grand Jury. His trusty segregationist lawyer, retired General Clyde Watts, was joined by attorney Robert Morris. Their strategy was to exploit the fact that JFK had sent Walker to an insane asylum.

They convinced the Grand Jury that the only question before them was whether or not General Walker was insane. To this end they called psychiatrists from Washington DC who signed the order to send Walker to an insane asylum, and psychiatrists from the South to argue that Walker was fit as a fiddle. To make a long story short, the Grand Jury agreed that Walker was not insane. They acquitted Walker of all charges related to the Ole Miss riots. Jeff Caufield writes:

Then, on January 21, 1963, an all-white federal jury in Oxford, supportive of Walker’s efforts at Oxford to maintain segregation, failed to indict Walker and – a few hours later – a U.S. Attorney asked that the charges be dismissed. (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 369)

Here is how Caufield summarizes this chapter:

By 1962, it was clear that General Walker was an angry soldier looking for a fight. His rise to national fame and the development of a dedicated following of segregationists, Klansmen, Minutemen and others on the far-right fringe made him all the more a dangerous man. There were four seminal events that occurred in 1962 that indicated General Walker was intent in acting against the federal government and the Kennedys and was prepared to resort to violence in doing so. (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 372)

According to Caufield, the four seminal events were:

(1) In early 1962, media sources reported rumors that the Radical Right was preparing for a rebellion, and pointed directly at General Pedro del Valle and Ex-General Walker.

(2) Written correspondence between General Pedro del Valle and Ex-General Walker revealed a strategic plan to include former military men, top rightist civilians, and violence to save the USA from imminent Communist catastrophe.

(3) Plots of violence by Ex-General Walker in late 1962 were exposed to the FBI by Willie Somersett.

(4) The deadly racial riot at Ole Miss on 30 September 1962 was directed by Ex-General Walker.

None of these events was ever presented to the Warren Commission, although the FBI was profoundly aware of all four. Caufield concludes this chapter, saying:

Had justice prevailed, Walker would have spent many years in a federal prison…It is clear that General Walker was more than ready to shed blood for his cause – and that he felt justified in doing so. (Caufield, General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy, 2015, p. 373)

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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Well, Paul, "proceeding further" is rather redundant, isn't it?

Maybe you should say "barging right ahead," instead?

Proceed.

--Tommy :sun

I have a better idea, Tommy. Offer something useful here, OK?

I'm tired of the negativity and wise-cracks.

Sincerely,

--Paul Trejo

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