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David Boylan

Official History of the Bay of Pigs

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Posted (edited)

I thought this part was already declassified.  Or is this on of those less redacted jobs?

It thought that only part 5 was still being argued about.

Is that also declassified?

Edited by James DiEugenio

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Posted (edited)

Phooey.  It wouldn't load.  Tried twice, little blue line never moved after couple of minutes each time.  Slow internet speeds out here in the country sometimes.  Though everything else seems to be working ok and I've read Black Vault articles from here before.  I'll try again later.  Just frustrating. 

Edited by Ron Bulman

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29 minutes ago, Ron Bulman said:

Phooey.  It wouldn't load.  Tried twice, little blue line never moved after couple of minutes each time.  Slow internet speeds out here in the country sometimes.  Though everything else seems to be working ok and I've read Black Vault articles from here before.  I'll try again later.  Just frustrating. 

It's 409 pages. It took a few minutes but finally loaded.

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Posted (edited)

Please allow me tplay with my iPad voice translator as I reproduce the opening paragraph.

 

This is the third volume of the official history of "The Bay of Pigs Operation" and focuses on the problems of establishing a policy for the United States government as Fidel Castro and his cohorts came to power in Cuba. The policy decided on by the US government in March 1960  called for the displacement of Fito Castro, and it was by no means a unilateral decision promoted by the Central intelligence agency – although he is demonstrable that the agency was far more precious perceptive than the policymaking bodies in recognizing the threat to the western hemisphere posed by Castro's communist affiliation.  Because the policymakers feared censure by the United Nations and or the organization of American states, the myth of "plausible deniability" was the caveat that determined the CIA would be the principal implementing arm for this anti-Castro effort. From inception to termination "deniability" would be the albatross around the necks of the agency planners; and from D day -2, it became the strangling cord insuring the failure of the effort at the Bay of Pigs...

 

Edited by Michael Clark

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