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The CIA's Family Jewels


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This is very important if it is true.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...7062102434.html

By Karen DeYoung and Walter Pincus

Washington Post Staff Writers

Friday, June 22, 2007; Page A01

The CIA will declassify hundreds of pages of long-secret records detailing some of the intelligence agency's worst illegal abuses -- the so-called "family jewels" documenting a quarter-century of overseas assassination attempts, domestic spying, kidnapping and infiltration of leftist groups from the 1950s to the 1970s, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said yesterday.

The documents, to be publicly released next week, also include accounts of break-ins and theft, the agency's opening of private mail to and from China and the Soviet Union, wiretaps and surveillance of journalists, and a series of "unwitting" tests on U.S. civilians, including the use of drugs.

"Most of it is unflattering, but it is CIA's history," Hayden said in a speech to a conference of foreign policy historians. The documents have been sought for decades by historians, journalists and conspiracy theorists and have been the subject of many fruitless Freedom of Information Act requests.

In anticipation of the CIA's release, the National Security Archive at George Washington University yesterday published a separate set of documents from January 1975 detailing internal government discussions of the abuses. Those documents portray a rising sense of panic within the administration of President Gerald R. Ford that what then-CIA Director William E. Colby called "skeletons" in the CIA's closet had begun to be revealed in news accounts.

A New York Times article by reporter Seymour Hersh about the CIA's infiltration of antiwar groups, published in December 1974, was "just the tip of the iceberg," then-Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger warned Ford, according to a Jan. 3 memorandum of their conversation.

Kissinger warned that if other operations were divulged, "blood will flow," saying, "For example, Robert Kennedy personally managed the operation on the assassination of [Cuban President Fidel] Castro." Kennedy was the attorney general from 1961 to 1964.

Worried that the disclosures could lead to criminal prosecutions, Kissinger added that "when the FBI has a hunting license into the CIA, this could end up worse for the country than Watergate," the scandal that led to the fall of the Nixon administration the previous year.

In a meeting at which Colby detailed the worst abuses -- after telling the president "we have a 25-year old institution which has done some things it shouldn't have" -- Ford said he would appoint a presidential commission to look into the matter. "We don't want to destroy but to preserve the CIA. But we want to make sure that illegal operations and those outside the [CIA] charter don't happen," Ford said.

Most of the major incidents and operations in the reports to be released next week were revealed in varying detail during congressional investigations that led to widespread intelligence reforms and increased oversight. But the treasure-trove of CIA documents, generated as the Vietnam War wound down and agency involvement in Nixon's "dirty tricks" political campaign began to be revealed, is expected to provide far more comprehensive accounts, written by the agency itself.

The reports, known collectively by historians and CIA officials as the "family jewels," were initially produced in response to a 1973 request by then-CIA Director James R. Schlesinger. Alarmed by press accounts of CIA involvement in Watergate under his predecessor, Schlesinger asked the agency's employees to inform him of all operations that were "outside" the agency's legal charter.

This process was unprecedented at the agency, where only a few officials had previously been privy to the scope of its illegal activities. Schlesinger collected the reports, some of which dated to the 1950s, in a folder that was inherited by his successor, Colby, in September of that year.

But it was not until Hersh's article that Colby took the file to the White House. The National Security Archive release included a six-page summary of a conversation on Jan. 3, 1975, in which Colby briefed the Justice Department for the first time on the extent of the "skeletons."

Operations listed in the report began in 1953, when the CIA's counterintelligence staff started a 20-year program to screen and in some cases open mail between the United States and the Soviet Union passing through a New York airport. A similar program in San Francisco intercepted mail to and from China from 1969 to 1972. Under its charter, the CIA is prohibited from domestic operations.

Colby told Ford that the program had collected four letters to actress and antiwar activist Jane Fonda and said the entire effort was "illegal, and we stopped it in 1973."

Among several new details, the summary document reveals a 1969 program about CIA efforts against "the international activities of radicals and black militants." Undercover CIA agents were placed inside U.S. peace groups and sent abroad as credentialed members to identify any foreign contacts. This came at a time when the Soviet Union was suspected of financing and influencing U.S. domestic organizations.

The program included "information on the domestic activities" of the organizations and led to the accumulation of 10,000 American names, which Colby told Silberman were retained "as a result of the tendency of bureaucrats to retain paper whether they needed it or acted on it or not," according to the summary memo.

CIA surveillance of Michael Getler, then The Washington Post's national security reporter, was conducted between October 1971 and April 1972 under direct authorization by then-Director Richard Helms, the memo said. Getler had written a story published on Oct. 18, 1971, sparked by what Colby called "an obvious intelligence leak," headlined "Soviet Subs Are Reported Cuba-Bound."

Getler, who is now the ombudsman for the Public Broadcasting Service, said yesterday that he learned of the surveillance in 1975, when The Post published an article based on a secret report by congressional investigators. The story said that the CIA used physical surveillance against "five Americans" and listed Getler, the late columnist Jack Anderson and Victor Marchetti, a former CIA employee who had just written a book critical of the agency.

"I never knew about it at the time, although it was a full 24 hours a day with teams of people following me, looking for my sources," Getler said. He said he went to see Colby afterward, with Washington lawyer Joseph Califano. Getler recalled, "Colby said it happened under Helms and apologized and said it wouldn't happen again."

Personal surveillance was conducted on Anderson and three of his staff members, including Britt Hume, now with Fox News, for two months in 1972 after Anderson wrote of the administration's "tilt toward Pakistan." The 1972 surveillance of Marchetti was carried out "to determine contacts with CIA employees," the summary said.

CIA monitoring and infiltration of antiwar dissident groups took place between 1967 and 1971 at a time when the public was turning against the Vietnam War. Agency officials "covertly monitored" groups in the Washington area "who were considered to pose a threat to CIA installations." Some of the information "might have been distributed to the FBI," the summary said. Other "skeletons" listed in the summary included:

· The confinement by the CIA of a Russian defector, suspected by the CIA as a possible "fake," in Maryland and Virginia safe houses for two years, beginning in 1964. Colby speculated that this might be "a violation of the kidnapping laws."

· The "very productive" 1963 wiretapping of two columnists -- Robert Allen and Paul Scott -- whose conversations included talks with 12 senators and six congressmen.

· Break-ins by the CIA's office of security at the homes of one current and one former CIA official suspected of retaining classified documents.

· CIA-funded testing of American citizens, "including reactions to certain drugs."

The CIA documents scheduled for release next week, Hayden said yesterday, "provide a glimpse of a very different time and a very different agency."

Barred by secrecy restrictions from correcting "misinformation," he said, the CIA is at the mercy of the press. "Unfortunately, there seems to be an instinct among some in the media today to take a few pieces of information, which may or may not be accurate, and run with them to the darkest corner of the room," Hayden said.

Hayden's speech and some questions that followed evoked more recent criticism of the intelligence community, which has been accused of illegal wiretapping, infiltration of antiwar groups, and kidnapping and torturing of terrorism suspects.

"It's surely part of [Hayden's] program now to draw a bright line with the past," said National Security Archive Director Thomas S. Blanton. "But it's uncanny how the government keeps dipping into the black bag." Newly revealed details of ancient CIA operations, Blanton said, "are pretty resonant today."

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"Kissinger added that "when the FBI has a hunting license into the CIA, this could end up worse for the country than Watergate," the scandal that led to the fall of the Nixon administration the previous year." ,,,and served the purpose of overshadowing revelations of the widespread wiretappings, breakins, disruptions, murder of people in general.

"...led to widespread intelligence reforms and increased oversight."

The same report has testimony about the practice that if a covert illegal op was disclosed, it went undeground and reformed and continued.***

"Operations listed in the report began in 1953, when the CIA's counterintelligence staff started a 20-year program to screen and in some cases open mail between the United States and the Soviet Union passing through a New York airport. A similar program in San Francisco intercepted mail to and from China from 1969 to 1972. Under its charter, the CIA is prohibited from domestic operations."

Just a note to highlight this year > 1953 <. Keeping it in mind, one can see a pattern related to seemingly unrelated events covered by other topics.

New Orleans and other places are also mentioned in the report. Further, by inference, as it involved Postal Inspectors, it is a Postal Inspection issue that likely included far more places tahn just the ones mentioned.

"Under its charter, the CIA is prohibited from domestic operations."

In the report, Kennedy appointee, Post Master General J. E. Day, was visited within a couple of weeks after assuming office by Dulles, Helms and another, and briefed, and until the 1970's investigation, (where Day comes across as a hostile witness), kept the details to himslelf. By inference this high level approach to each successive PMG from 1953 is reasonably assumed.

BTW it is not certain it started in 1953, it may have been earlier. Certainly it has precedents dating back to the Civil War when the Union and Confederates had their own separate PO departments. The USPO, or as it is known today, the USPS, is the oldest of all Governement departments. Even then there are separate Postal Services such as within the Army and between Agencies. Surveillance and mailopenings has a long history.

When the USPO became the USPS, the PMG ceased being a Cabinet member and a patronaged position. Simultaneously many previous USPO PI's resigned and new ones appointed. No doubt records of the old USPO did not pass on to the new USPS.

"...and we stopped it in 1973."

"Colby said it happened under Helms and apologized and said it wouldn't happen again."

Yes, sure. see above***

"...a glimpse..."

And that's probably just all it will be. Though hopefully new info will be forthcoming.

"...the CIA is at the mercy of the press."

duh???

Edited by John Dolva
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"Kissinger added that "when the FBI has a hunting license into the CIA, this could end up worse for the country than Watergate," the scandal that led to the fall of the Nixon administration the previous year." ,,,and served the purpose of overshadowing revelations of the widespread wiretappings, breakins, disruptions, murder of people in general.

"...led to widespread intelligence reforms and increased oversight."

The same report has testimony about the practice that if a covert illegal op was disclosed, it went undeground and reformed and continued.***

"Operations listed in the report began in 1953, when the CIA's counterintelligence staff started a 20-year program to screen and in some cases open mail between the United States and the Soviet Union passing through a New York airport. A similar program in San Francisco intercepted mail to and from China from 1969 to 1972. Under its charter, the CIA is prohibited from domestic operations."

Just a note to highlight this year > 1953 <. Keeping it in mind, one can see a pattern related to seemingly unrelated events covered by other topics.

New Orleans and other places are also mentioned in the report. Further, by inference, as it involved Postal Inspectors, it is a Postal Inspection issue that likely included far more places tahn just the ones mentioned.

"Under its charter, the CIA is prohibited from domestic operations."

In the report, Kennedy appointee, Post Master General J. E. Day, was visited within a couple of weeks after assuming office by Dulles, Helms and another, and briefed, and until the 1970's investigation, (where Day comes across as a hostile witness), kept the details to himslelf. By inference this high level approach to each successive PMG from 1953 is reasonably assumed.

BTW it is not certain it started in 1953, it may have been earlier. Certainly it has precedents dating back to the Civil War when the Union and Confederates had their own separate PO departments. The USPO, or as it is known today, the USPS, is the oldest of all Governement departments. Even then there are separate Postal Services such as within the Army and between Agencies. Surveillance and mailopenings has a long history.

When the USPO became the USPS, the PMG ceased being a Cabinet member and a patronaged position. Simultaneously many previous USPO PI's resigned and new ones appointed. No doubt records of the old USPO did not pass on to the new USPS.

"...and we stopped it in 1973."

"Colby said it happened under Helms and apologized and said it wouldn't happen again."

Yes, sure. see above***

"...a glimpse..."

And that's probably just all it will be. Though hopefully new info will be forthcoming.

"...the CIA is at the mercy of the press."

duh???

I would second the observations made by John Dolva with regards to the issue of monitoring mail [ie other cities, besides N.O.] In all fairness though, it is hard to understand how the government is supposed to protect American's without monitoring mail in certain situations, although I am speaking of the Cold War Era.

Today the threats are much more substantive; the problem I have is that with the government, these types of issues, boil down the old "give an inch, take a mile" adage. Once legality is compromised, one can only hope that the truth comes to light. It sure hasn't with the JFK Assassination. It seems like a hallmark of America's two-party system, that the Republican's don't care much about civil liberties, common people or the world's perception of America, whereas the Democrats, used to be the diametric opposite. The latter seem to be afraid of what was once their bread and butter, but that's another story......

Bottom line, the other things that appear to crawl out from under the rug re the period 1953-1963 are.......

MK/ULTRA

US ARMY & Bio-warfare

and infiltration/manipulation of radical [and not so radical] organizations.....

Item's 1 and 2 were definitely operative with regards to the periphery of the Assassination of Pres. Kennedy.....

I think the big picture, with these types of thing's is not even the actions themselves as much, as the ones who order it, or allow it to happen. Which us why I despise Cheney and Rumsfeld, they were part of Nixon's goon squad, and now American's seem to have forgotten what goon's are

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Cleveland Cram first identified the "Family Jewels". Cram, the former Chief of Station in the Western Hemisphere, retired from the CIA in 1975. The CIA asked Cram to carry out an investigation into James Jesus Angleton's reign from 1954 to 1974. Cram took the assignment and was given access to all CIA documents on covert operations. The study entitled History of the Counterintelligence Staff 1954-1974, took six years to complete. As David Wise points out in his book Molehunt (1992): "When Cram finally finished it in 1981... he had produced twelve legal-sized volumes, each three hundred to four hundred pages. Cram's approximately four-thousand-page study has never been declassified. It remains locked in the CIA's vaults."

It would be more important if Cram's investigation was declassified rather than selected documents. I am sure Cram's report covered the CIA involvement in the JFK assassination.

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Chris Matthews and the Beltway Boobs are all aflutter as they await the release of the so-called Family Jewels report from Langley, due next week.

They are all KUBARKing up the wrong tree, I fear. This is a hangout -- not exactly limited, but a hangout nonetheless.

At least such is my expectation.

Let's take full advantage of what transpires in this regard over the next few weeks to gain understandings of just how much we have learned about how THEY attempt to beguile us.

Already a Kissinger quote about RFK's alleged direction of the Castro hit attempts is making the circuit. If such information were to be released, the bloodthirsty doctor is said to have opined way back then, there will be blood in the streets.

Clever boots! What a fiendish way to lend believability to that myth for future generations -- always the bastards' prime target of opportunity.

Let the games ... continue.

Charles

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Chris Matthews and the Beltway Boobs are all aflutter as they await the release of the so-called Family Jewels report from Langley, due next week.

They are all KUBARKing up the wrong tree, I fear. This is a hangout -- not exactly limited, but a hangout nonetheless.

At least such is my expectation.

Let's take full advantage of what transpires in this regard over the next few weeks to gain understandings of just how much we have learned about how THEY attempt to beguile us.

Already a Kissinger quote about RFK's alleged direction of the Castro hit attempts is making the circuit. If such information were to be released, the bloodthirsty doctor is said to have opined way back then, there will be blood in the streets.

Clever boots! What a fiendish way to lend believability to that myth for future generations -- always the bastards' prime target of opportunity.

Let the games ... continue.

Charles

Charles...us older types have been thru these LIMITED HANGOUTS

so many times it is transparent as glass to me. They will release

some tantalizing tidbits which were mostly no longer secret anyway.

They will all be in directions which lead AWAY from JFK. The media

will be on them like a cat with catnip, saying WHAT GOOD BOYS

THEY ARE AT LANGLEY TO FINALLY COME CLEAN ON EVERYTHING.

Now that the "truth" is out, you can finally sleep at night. Glory be!

And the beat goes on.

Jack

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Charles...us older types have been thru these LIMITED HANGOUTS

so many times it is transparent as glass to me. They will release

some tantalizing tidbits which were mostly no longer secret anyway.

They will all be in directions which lead AWAY from JFK. The media

will be on them like a cat with catnip, saying WHAT GOOD BOYS

THEY ARE AT LANGLEY TO FINALLY COME CLEAN ON EVERYTHING.

Now that the "truth" is out, you can finally sleep at night. Glory be!

And the beat goes on.

Jack

They'll probably be released and heavily blacked out for national security reasons.

Kathy

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Just curious, are there no legal implications at all for the individuals or agency in regard

to witholding this information from Congress and various Congressional inquiries.

Can they deny they have it, say so under oath and then a few years later say...oh yeah, we

just didn't happen to mention these documents when you asked for them....

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Just curious, are there no legal implications at all for the individuals or agency in regard

to witholding this information from Congress and various Congressional inquiries.

Can they deny they have it, say so under oath and then a few years later say...oh yeah, we

just didn't happen to mention these documents when you asked for them....

Arguably the question could be applied to a wide variety of topics, all very pertinent to events very timely, wink, wink.....The point should be made that if a child reaches his hand into the cookie jar and knows he doesent face any risk of disciplinarian action, grins then there is nothing to worry about, what is there to be afraid of. Conversely........

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This is how the Guardian reported the story this morning.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/usa/story/0,,2109335,00.html

Simon Tisdall in Washington

Friday June 22, 2007

Guardian Unlimited

The CIA is to declassify secret records detailing illegal domestic surveillance, assassination plots, kidnapping, infiltration and other "black" operations undertaken from the 1950s to the early 1970s. The files detail the ageny's activities at the height of the cold war with the Soviet Union and "Red" China; and the Vietnam conflict.

The records were compiled in 1973 at the behest of the then CIA director, James Schlesinger, and collected in a 693-page dossier known as the "family jewels". Although some of its contents have previously been leaked, the CIA has refused until now to place the full dossier in the public domain.

Mr Schlesinger acted after discovering that Howard Hunt and James McCord, veteran CIA officers whose burglary of a Washington hotel room triggered the Watergate scandal, had received the agency's cooperation in carrying out "dirty tricks" for President Richard Nixon.

According to the National Security Archive at George Washington University, Mr Schlesinger directed his officials to collate details of any other current or past agency activity that "might fall outside CIA authority" - that was, in other words, illegal.

The results of the internal trawl were breathtaking. But within months of finalising the "family jewels" dossier, William Colby replaced Mr Schlesinger as CIA chief. When the New York Times published a report on the CIA's domestic surveillance operations in December 1974, apparently based in part on the dossier, panic erupted inside the administration of president Gerald Ford (who had succeeded the disgraced Nixon the previous August).

At a damage-limitation meeting with James Wilderotter, the deputy attorney general, in January 1975, Mr Colby laid bare what he called the "skeletons" concealed in the dossier. Minutes of the meeting, obtained by the National Security Archive and posted on the university website today, listed the skeletons one by one.

Domestic black operations included the illegal detention and interrogation of a Russian defector, the wiretapping of two nationally-read columnists, Robert Allen and Paul Scott, and the surveillance of other journalists including the late Jack Anderson and Victor Marchetti, a former CIA operative who had turned against the agency. Several illegal break-ins are also listed.

According to the minutes, Mr Colby said some US citizens had been subjected to "unwitting" CIA drug experiments to induce "behaviour modification". The CIA had also illegally amassed 9,900 files on Americans involved in Vietnam-related anti-war activities.

The Colby-Wilderotter minutes also state that the CIA "plotted the assassination of some foreign leaders including (Fidel) Castro (of Cuba), (Patrice) Lumumba (of the Democratic Republic of Congo) and (Rafael) Trujillo (of the Dominican Republic)."

They go on: "With respect to Trujillo's assassination on May 30 1961, the CIA had 'no active part' but had a 'faint connection' with the groups that in fact did it."

In an official record of a White House meeting with president Ford the next day, on January 4 1975, a rattled Henry Kissinger, the secretary of state and national security adviser, argues that the existence of the "family jewels" dossier, and its partial leaking to the press, may turn into a major scandal - with the FBI being obliged to investigate the CIA.

"What is happening is worse than in the days of McCarthy. You will end up with a CIA that does only reporting, not operations... What Colby has done is a disgrace." Dr Kissinger tells the president.

He goes on: "All these stories are just the tip of the iceberg. If they come out, blood will flow. For example, Robert Kennedy (the former attorney general and president Kennedy's brother) personally managed the operation on the assassination of Castro."

Mr Ford says he agrees but Dr Kissinger continues his rant: "The Chilean thing - that is not in any report. That is sort of blackmail on me." The comment is not explained. Salvador Allende, president of Chile, died in a US-backed military coup in September 1973.

Announcing the decision to release the "family jewels" next week, plus 11,000 pages of "hard target" intelligence gathered about the Soviet Union and China between 1953 and 1973, General Michael Hayden, the CIA director, said they offered a "glimpse of a very different time and a very different agency".

In an apparent attempt to persuade Americans that the agency has changed its spots, Gen Hayden added: "The CIA recognises the very real benefits that flow from greater public understanding of our work."

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National Archive Release

See The Documents........

The CIA's Family Jewels

Agency Violated Charter for 25 Years,

Wiretapped Journalists and Dissidents

CIA Announces Declassification of 1970s "Skeletons" File,

Archive Posts Justice Department Summary from 1975,

With White House Memcons on Damage Control

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 222

Edited by Thomas Blanton

Posted - June 21, 2007

Seymour Hersh broke the story of CIA's illegal domestic operations with

a front page story in the New York Times on December 22, 1974.

In the news

"CIA to Air Decades of Its Dirty Laundry"

By Karen DeYoung and Walter Pincus

Washington Post

June 22, 2007

"CIA Kidnapping, Wiretapping of '60s, '70s Revealed"

Morning Edition (National Public Radio)

June 22, 2007

"C.I.A. to Release Documents on Decades-Old Misdeeds"

By Scott Shane

New York Times

June 22, 2007

Chronology of the CIA's record on declassification

CIA Proposed Rule on FOIA Fees Would Burden Requesters and the Agency

February 7, 2007

CIA Had Single Officer in Hungary 1956

October 31, 2006

CIA Claims the Right to Decide What is News

June 14, 2006

Secret Understanding Between National Archives and CIA Exposes Framework for Surreptitious Reclassification Program

April 19, 2006

CIA Wins 2006 "Rosemary Award" for Worst Freedom of Information Performance by a Federal Agency

March 13, 2006

Declassification in Reverse

February 21, 2006

PDB News - The President's Daily Brief

January 27, 2006

Judge Refuses In Camera Review of CIA Estimate on Iraq

October 21, 2005

Public Interest in Hidden CIA Operational Records Is High

January 21, 2005

Professor Sues CIA for President's Daily Briefs

December 23, 2004

Archive Calls on CIA and Congress to Address Loophole Shielding CIA Records From the Freedom of Information Act

October 15, 2004

CIA Whites Out Controversial Estimate on Iraq Weapons

July 9, 2004

Dubious Secrets

May 21, 2003

The Secret CIA History of the Iran Coup

November 29, 2000

Lawsuit calls CIA secrecy claims "facially incredible"

August 2, 2000

Archive Sues CIA

May 13, 1999

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CIA's Broken Promises on Declassification

What Others Say about CIA's Promises

"C.I.A., Breaking Promises, Puts Off Release of Cold War Files"

By Tim Weiner

New York Times (Select)

July 15, 1998

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB222/index.htm

B.......

Edited by Bernice Moore
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Robert: "...think the big picture, with these types of thing's is not even the actions themselves as much, as the ones who order it, or allow it to happen. Which us why I despise Cheney and Rumsfeld, they were part of Nixon's goon squad, and now American's seem to have forgotten what goon's are."

Interestingly, a republican initiative apparently centered in Dallas is a cyber division aimed at disrupting opponenets.

'Cybergoons'

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...p;hl=Cybergoons

"During the Republican National Convention, a group of hackers called RightWingExtremist.net was formed by Brett Chance (elac, clorox, awb0t, etc) from Plano TX. This group came out of the ultra conservative ProtestWarrior.com who advocates disrupting and attacking leftist organizations.

.....a group calling itself the g00ns.com have attacked and defaced a dozen indymedia websites using the vulnerability posted to dadaimc. On the hacked websites, a message calling indymedia 'liars' and 'anti-republicans' were posted. Soon after, hackers and indymedia techs started working together to fix each other's code and bring backups back online as well as find information about the g00ns.

The g00ns started out by targetting and attacking online gaming clan websites, but eventually Elac from RightWingExtremist.net joined up and started to turn the group farther to the right. When the IndyMedia sites were hacked, people started to gather information and infiltrate their organization and soon after all of their private details were released to the public to show like actions like this will not go unnoticed.

Many other right-wing trolls continue to try to disrupt IndyMedia and left-wing protest groups. These individuals operate under several different names including ProtestWarrior.com, RightWingExtremist.net, FreeRepublic.com, KobeHQ.com, FreeDominion.com, LittleGreenFootballs.com, and more. Many of these groups are suspected of being financed operations from governments or corporations similar to the COINTELPRO program from the 60s and 70s. Common activities range from flooding message boards, faking votes and reviews in online polls, releasing personal information of key organizers, spreading false rumors and scandals, etc."

OrgName: ThePlanet.com Internet Services, Inc.

OrgID: TPCM

Address: 1333 North Stemmons Freeway

Address: Suite 110

City: Dallas

StateProv: TX

PostalCode: 75207

Country: US

ReferralServer: rwhois://rwhois.theplanet.com:4321

NetRange: 70.84.0.0 - 70.87.127.255

CIDR: 70.84.0.0/15, 70.86.0.0/16, 70.87.0.0/17

NetName: NETBLK-THEPLANET-BLK-13

NetHandle: NET-70-84-0-0-1

Parent: NET-70-0-0-0-0

NetType: Direct Allocation

NameServer: NS1.THEPLANET.COM

NameServer: NS2.THEPLANET.COM

name: www.g00ns.com

data: 147.70-84-85.reverse.theplanet.com

Edited by John Dolva
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One of the components here will be the supposed 'faint connections' the Agency had to the Trujillo assassination. This potentially is a real can of worms.

Arturo Espaillat went public back in 1962 saying that American Intel types were behind the killing. Trujillo plotters and participants Luis Amiama Tio and heavyweight Antonio Imbert Barreras worked with an American named Plato Cox to secure the weapons needed to get the job done. Cox being Robert Emmett Johnson. Imbert Barreras is still alive so it would be interesting if he offers an opinion once the material is made public.

I also think the program run by James Angelton and Richard Ober where securing foreign links to American dissidents will be included. This is another potentially explosive aspect with some serious implications.

Fascinating indeed.

James

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Just curious, are there no legal implications at all for the individuals or agency in regard

to witholding this information from Congress and various Congressional inquiries.

Can they deny they have it, say so under oath and then a few years later say...oh yeah, we

just didn't happen to mention these documents when you asked for them....

Arguably the question could be applied to a wide variety of topics, all very pertinent to events very timely, wink, wink.....The point should be made that if a child reaches his hand into the cookie jar and knows he doesent face any risk of disciplinarian action, grins then there is nothing to worry about, what is there to be afraid of. Conversely........

That is a very perceptive remark, IMO.

Has anyone ever being charged in a major western jurisdiction with falsifying archives or withholding material by incorrec classification or other means to obstruct its timely release? It may have happened, but I can't recall a case.

How can we possibly trust that due process is followed with archival releases in the USA, Britain etc - given the deep sickness in our political cultures through infection by unaccountable and out of control 'state security' networks?

That's not to discount all the new information that becomes available over time, but the national archives must be read, as others have pointed out, with eyes wide open. Perhaps a Government Health warning should be on each page? Warning: This material may expose you to 'limited hangouts' and other blind alleys.

Weeding archives (even planting a few deliberate deceits) is, I imagine, relatively easy for those in control of 'national security'.

After all, they have plenty of time to do it.

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Robert: "...think the big picture, with these types of thing's is not even the actions themselves as much, as the ones who order it, or allow it to happen. Which us why I despise Cheney and Rumsfeld, they were part of Nixon's goon squad, and now American's seem to have forgotten what goon's are."

Interestingly, a republican initiative apparently centered in Dallas is a cyber division aimed at disrupting opponenets.

'Cybergoons'

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...p;hl=Cybergoons

"During the Republican National Convention, a group of hackers called RightWingExtremist.net was formed by Brett Chance (elac, clorox, awb0t, etc) from Plano TX. This group came out of the ultra conservative ProtestWarrior.com who advocates disrupting and attacking leftist organizations.

.....a group calling itself the g00ns.com have attacked and defaced a dozen indymedia websites using the vulnerability posted to dadaimc. On the hacked websites, a message calling indymedia 'liars' and 'anti-republicans' were posted. Soon after, hackers and indymedia techs started working together to fix each other's code and bring backups back online as well as find information about the g00ns.

The g00ns started out by targetting and attacking online gaming clan websites, but eventually Elac from RightWingExtremist.net joined up and started to turn the group farther to the right. When the IndyMedia sites were hacked, people started to gather information and infiltrate their organization and soon after all of their private details were released to the public to show like actions like this will not go unnoticed.

Many other right-wing trolls continue to try to disrupt IndyMedia and left-wing protest groups. These individuals operate under several different names including ProtestWarrior.com, RightWingExtremist.net, FreeRepublic.com, KobeHQ.com, FreeDominion.com, LittleGreenFootballs.com, and more. Many of these groups are suspected of being financed operations from governments or corporations similar to the COINTELPRO program from the 60s and 70s. Common activities range from flooding message boards, faking votes and reviews in online polls, releasing personal information of key organizers, spreading false rumors and scandals, etc."

OrgName: ThePlanet.com Internet Services, Inc.

OrgID: TPCM

Address: 1333 North Stemmons Freeway

Address: Suite 110

City: Dallas

StateProv: TX

PostalCode: 75207

Country: US

ReferralServer: rwhois://rwhois.theplanet.com:4321

NetRange: 70.84.0.0 - 70.87.127.255

CIDR: 70.84.0.0/15, 70.86.0.0/16, 70.87.0.0/17

NetName: NETBLK-THEPLANET-BLK-13

NetHandle: NET-70-84-0-0-1

Parent: NET-70-0-0-0-0

NetType: Direct Allocation

NameServer: NS1.THEPLANET.COM

NameServer: NS2.THEPLANET.COM

name: www.g00ns.com

data: 147.70-84-85.reverse.theplanet.com

Little Green Footballs brought down the DellaRosa JFKforum two or three times,

mostly by flooding with messages. The Swiftboat Veterans also did similar

things.

Jack

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