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David Ferrie


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I found this on the Internet. I couldn't believe it, but apparently it is true. Ferrie was once a Jesuit. In an ad for a new book about the Jesuit Assassins, they show a picture of Ferrie dressed as a priest. He did not look like a novitiate. Here he is:

November 23, 2009: Kennedy Assassination, Jesuit David Ferrie

Posted by EJP on Nov 24th, 2009 and filed under Jesuits, Radio. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

The Kennedy Assassination is reviewed with special emphasis put upon the Jesuit Order and one of its pawns, David Ferrie. Educated by Jesuits and having prepared for the priesthood, Ferrie was both a CIA agent and mafioso affiliated with New Orleans Mafia Don Carlos Marcello. Ferrie was also connected to the Jesuits of Loyola University in New Orleans according to Joan Mellon in her Farewell to Justice. The Jesuit Order, in command of its CIA via Knight of Malta John A. McCone, murdered President Kennedy. Four days later, on November 26, 1963, the Chivalric Alliance of Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem was consolidated with the signing of a joint declaration between the Sovereign Military Order of Malta and the Most Venerable Order at St. John’s Gate, London, by the Prince of Resuttano—the Grand Chancellor of the Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of Malta (SMHOM), and Lord Wakehurst—Lord Prior of the Most Venerable Order. The formal alliance further solidified the Black Pope’s International Intelligence Community—the clandestine Holy Office of the Inquisition. Overseeing the planning, the assassination and subsequent cover-up was “the American Pope,” Francis Cardinal Spellman.

Categories: Jesuits, Radio

Tags: CIA, Kennedy Assassination

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I have known about this for years, and have seen that picture of Ferrie as a Priest 100s of times

I just assumed all researchers and students of the assassination knew about Ferrie trying to become a priest

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I have known about this for years, and have seen that picture of Ferrie as a Priest 100s of times

I just assumed all researchers and students of the assassination knew about Ferrie trying to become a priest

I never saw that photo before and I remember something vaguely about his studying for the priesthood. I think he was gay.

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I'm lacking research works to make comparison - is this Catholic involvement separate from Ferrie's membership, with Raymond Broshears, in a thing called, I think, the Old Catholic Church, basically a bunch of diploma-mill mystic pederasts claiming to be Catholic apostates? Just want to be sure.

Edited by David Andrews
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I have known about this for years, and have seen that picture of Ferrie as a Priest 100s of times

I just assumed all researchers and students of the assassination knew about Ferrie trying to become a priest

I never saw that photo before and I remember something vaguely about his studying for the priesthood. I think he was gay.

I think thats the reason he could not become a priest or the reason he was disfellowshipped (I dont know the Catholic term for when you are kicked out)

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"I don't know the Catholic term for when you are kicked out"

>

>

Defrocked. Because they're men in skirts, ostensibly practicing celibacy at close quarters.*

+++

* No offense doctrinally or otherwise, I was raised Catholic and still observe the prayer forms. And I don't care what people enjoy absent child abuse and other atrocities - including assassination.

Edited by David Andrews
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when one is kicked out of the church it is called Excommunication .b

Priests may be defrocked - ejected from the priesthood - without being excommunicated, which is to be denied participation in worship and church community, and refused the blessings of the Sacraments. Henry VIII was excommunicated for rejecting the Pope's authority; David Ferrie, defrocked for homosexuality. This is eight years of Catholic school talking, Bernice.

Edited by David Andrews
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when one is kicked out of the church it is called Excommunication .b

Priests may be defrocked - ejected from the priesthood - without being excommunicated, which is to be denied participation in worship and church community, and refused the blessings of the Sacraments. Henry VIII was excommunicated for rejecting the Pope's authority; David Ferrie, defrocked for homosexuality. This is eight years of Catholic school talking, Bernice.

This is 17 years of Catholic School speaking. I know of the Old Roman Church. I don't think Ferrie belonged to them -- but I'll recheck. They're an older society and different from the Roman Catholics and much smaller in membership, to say the least. The article about Ferrie said Jesuits.

Kathy C

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Ferrie's religious history is twofold:

First, he was raised strictly Catholic and began as an altar boy, choir member and organist (no jokes, please.) Then he attended Saint Mary Seminary in Cleveland. He was asked not to return due to unsureness of his calling. A few years later, he attended St. Charles Seminary in Carthagena. He was asked not to return there due to several factors, not least that he came into conflict with teachers and other seminarians. I don't recall if either group was Jesuit; I'll check. The records of his dismissal are vague. He may have had one or more nervous breakdowns. While there is no overt mention of homosexuality, there may be a hint or two. A possibly related reason for dismissal is that he was antinomian: he believed that a strict traditional moral code did not apply to a person of sufficient faith, in terms if getting to Heaven.

In later years, he applied unsuccessfully to 2 or 3 other seminaries in Ohio, Texas and Louisiana. He stayed close to the legitimate Catholic Church in Louisiana: He interacted with clergymen at Tulane and other colleges; he helped boys matriculate to seminaries; he helped them convert to Catholicism and become baptized; and he tried to set up connections between his CAP cadets and several New Orleans area churches.

In late 1961, he was asked to help Jack S. Martin in an investigation of "ordination mills", "Old Orthodox Catholic Church of North America" type offshoots (not affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church) to obtain evidence of a fraudulent ordination. (Ferrie was ordained, but this group excommunicated him after the bad publicity from Ferrie's morals arrests). This put Ferrie in touch with several members/leaders of these offshoots, and Ferrie seems to have taken it seriously. By 1963, he was ordained in one of them, but he drifted in and out for the next few years.

The picture of Ferrie in priest garb in front of a seminary was mislabeled by me when I first posted it, and has ricocheted over the years. It is St. Charles, NOT Saint Mary.

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Guest Tom Scully
Ferrie's religious history is twofold:

.........

And you are citing, what? Is your own research of original records, the foundations of your claims?

My posts, for example, take a long time to put together, but anybody reading them can view my sources for nearly every key detail.

Pardon me....I do not mean to single you out; I'm just growing weary after reading the unsubstantiated nonsense about "flechette-transported poison," in the now 75 posts long, Alen J Salerian, MD thread.

Fantasy and poorly supported claims dilute the trove of reliable references accumulated on these pages. The more this happens, the more of an obligation all of us have to share how we know what we know in every one of our posts.

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Ferrie's religious history is twofold:

First, he was raised strictly Catholic and began as an altar boy, choir member and organist (no jokes, please.) Then he attended Saint Mary Seminary in Cleveland. He was asked not to return due to unsureness of his calling. A few years later, he attended St. Charles Seminary in Carthagena. He was asked not to return there due to several factors, not least that he came into conflict with teachers and other seminarians. I don't recall if either group was Jesuit; I'll check. The records of his dismissal are vague. He may have had one or more nervous breakdowns. While there is no overt mention of homosexuality, there may be a hint or two. A possibly related reason for dismissal is that he was antinomian: he believed that a strict traditional moral code did not apply to a person of sufficient faith, in terms if getting to Heaven.

In later years, he applied unsuccessfully to 2 or 3 other seminaries in Ohio, Texas and Louisiana. He stayed close to the legitimate Catholic Church in Louisiana: He interacted with clergymen at Tulane and other colleges; he helped boys matriculate to seminaries; he helped them convert to Catholicism and become baptized; and he tried to set up connections between his CAP cadets and several New Orleans area churches.

In late 1961, he was asked to help Jack S. Martin in an investigation of "ordination mills", "Old Orthodox Catholic Church of North America" type offshoots (not affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church) to obtain evidence of a fraudulent ordination. (Ferrie was ordained, but this group excommunicated him after the bad publicity from Ferrie's morals arrests). This put Ferrie in touch with several members/leaders of these offshoots, and Ferrie seems to have taken it seriously. By 1963, he was ordained in one of them, but he drifted in and out for the next few years.

The picture of Ferrie in priest garb in front of a seminary was mislabeled by me when I first posted it, and has ricocheted over the years. It is St. Charles, NOT Saint Mary.

Thanks, Stephen, for your research. I should have tried to pin it down more. So it's true. Ferrie wanted to be a Jesuit, according to what I found. Where did you get all this info about Ferrie? He was into so many things. He probably heard about the Jesuit order and the "Vatican Assassins" and thought he'd be in good fellowship.

Kathy C

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Ferrie's religious history is twofold:

.........

And you are citing, what? Is your own research of original records, the foundations of your claims?

My posts, for example, take a long time to put together, but anybody reading them can view my sources for nearly every key detail.

Pardon me....I do not mean to single you out; I'm just growing weary after reading the unsubstantiated nonsense about "flechette-transported poison," in the now 75 posts long, Alen J Salerian, MD thread.

Fantasy and poorly supported claims dilute the trove of reliable references accumulated on these pages. The more this happens, the more of an obligation all of us have to share how we know what we know in every one of our posts.

Yes, an overview of this type represents my observations from a mountain of original research. Much of the material related to Saint Mary and St. Charles comes from documents provided by both seminaries to Eastern Air Lines in connection with an investigation of Ferrie, 1961-3. I obtained them from the archives. These are supplemented by interviews with various people, some of which I personally conducted.

The info on the Old Orthodox Catholic Church of North America (and related groups) comes from MANY sources: Interviews of Ferrie and Martin, newspaper accounts, some of Ferrie's correspondence (some of which I proved to Flammonde, and is in his book) and interviews with many people, some of which I conducted myself.

While there is no single source I can cite for all of it, I will be listing individual sources when I finally finish my Ferrie biography. If you have a specific question, I can probaby point to a specific source.

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Thanks, Stephen, for your research. I should have tried to pin it down more. So it's true. Ferrie wanted to be a Jesuit, according to what I found. Where did you get all this info about Ferrie? He was into so many things. He probably heard about the Jesuit order and the "Vatican Assassins" and thought he'd be in good fellowship.

Kathy C

See my reply to Tom. I started researching Ferrie many years ago. I found lots of stuff at the National Archives, at AARC and other places. When the HSCA report came out, it echoed much of what I found, but pointed me to new sources. Most of that eventually came out in the NA under the ARRB releases.

As I read through each document, I made notes about certain sections referring to certain things, and kept a running chronology. When the time came to write a particular section, I would review all the relevant documents and write it up. Not unlike doing a puzzle, finding pieces that went together and organizing the whole thing. Where I had missing pieces, I would try to contact the persons involved for clarification (which, of course, often led to more things!) The final result will be hepful in understanding Ferrie.

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Thanks, Stephen, for your research. I should have tried to pin it down more. So it's true. Ferrie wanted to be a Jesuit, according to what I found. Where did you get all this info about Ferrie? He was into so many things. He probably heard about the Jesuit order and the "Vatican Assassins" and thought he'd be in good fellowship.

Kathy C

See my reply to Tom. I started researching Ferrie many years ago. I found lots of stuff at the National Archives, at AARC and other places. When the HSCA report came out, it echoed much of what I found, but pointed me to new sources. Most of that eventually came out in the NA under the ARRB releases.

As I read through each document, I made notes about certain sections referring to certain things, and kept a running chronology. When the time came to write a particular section, I would review all the relevant documents and write it up. Not unlike doing a puzzle, finding pieces that went together and organizing the whole thing. Where I had missing pieces, I would try to contact the persons involved for clarification (which, of course, often led to more things!) The final result will be hepful in understanding Ferrie.

I hope to read your book someday. (Everytime I think of Ferrie, I think of Joe Pesci.)

Kathy C

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