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In the profile of DPD officer Paul K. Wilkins in the Dealey Plaza Echos that was just posted at MF - he mentions that he was one of the first car patrol officers to arrive at the TSBD.

Parking his patrol car outside the front door, Wilkins says he went up the back steps to the Sixth Floor and saw a lot of officers from a number of different departments and agencies, including the DPD and Sheriff's Department, but also mentions "a couple of officers from the Games Management Agency."

Who were these guys?

Do we know who from the Texas Game Commission were on the Sixth Floor and whether they wrote a report on their activities there?

This must be the Texas Game Commission.

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/TT/mdttk.htmlTEXAS GAME AND FISH COMMISSION. The idea of managing the state's wildlife resources developed over several decades in the latter half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries. As the state's human population began to increase, especially after the arrival of the first railroads in the 1850s, the wildlife population began to decline. The state's first effort to regulate hunting occurred 1861, when the legislature established a two-year closed season on quail. Fishing regulations, in the form of restrictions on coastal seining and netting, were instituted in 1874. In 1879 the legislature established the office of Fish Commissioner to enforce such regulations; the office was abolished five years later because of intense controversy surrounding the introduction of German carp to Texas waterways . In 1883 130 counties in Texas claimed exemption from all game laws. By 1895, however, it had become clear that some regulatory office was needed to control the depletion caused by overfishing; in response to this need the legislature established the office of Fish and Oyster Commissioner. In 1907 the legislature also gave the commissioner the responsibility for hunting regulations, and the name of the office was changed to Game, Fish, and Oyster Commissioner. The first hunting licenses were sold in 1909. In 1919 the state had only six game wardens to enforce regulations, and many counties continued to claim exemptions; the number of wardens was increased to forty-five by 1923 and to eighty by 1928. In the 1920s the commissioner's office began developing extensive fish hatcheries in order to supplement the dwindling natural supply of fish; restocking of deer and releases of nilgai antelope began in the late 1920s and early 1930s. In 1929 the duties of the commissioner were transferred to a board-called the Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission-which was composed of six members, appointed by the governor for overlapping six-year terms. The commission appointed an executive secretary, who acted as chief executive officer. With the commission format, the agency had more stable leadership than the earlier single-commissioner style did, and as a result it became more consistent in its policy-making and enforcement. The major duties of the commission were to enforce the laws of the state pertaining to birds, game, fur-bearing animals, fish, and marine life; to issue hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses; to proclaim open seasons and bag limits on various types of game and fish; to operate fish hatcheries; to administer game preserves; to supervise the oyster beds of the state; to control the sand, shell, and gravel in the state's public waters; and to inform the public about the state's wildlife resources. In 1942 the commission began publishing Texas Game and Fish magazine, and in 1946 it began a statewide conservation education program. In 1951 the legislature expanded the commission to nine members and removed the term "oyster" from the commission's name. In 1958 the commission controlled hunting and fishing regulations in eighty counties; by 1962 hunting and fishing activities in 129 counties were under full or partial control of the commission's regulatory authority. The Texas Game and Fish Commission merged with the State Parks Board in 1963 to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Ed H. Ferguson, Jr., Ellen Schmidt, and Shirley Ratisseau Sweeney, "Let's Get Acquainted," Texas Game and Fish, October 1954-June 1955. Texas Parks and Wildlife Conservation Chronicle (Austin: Texas Parks and Wildlife, 1990).

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tslac/20151/tsl-20151.html

Texas Game and Fish Commission:

An Inventory of Game and Fish Commission Records at the Texas State Archives, 1896, 1899-1969, 1976, bulk 1928-1963

Overview

Creator:Texas. Game and Fish Commission.Title:Game and Fish Commission recordsDates:1896, 1899-1969, 1976Dates: bulk 1928-1963Abstract:The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting and fishing activities; enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in 1963. Types of records consist of minutes, correspondence, various reports, clippings and other printed materials, news releases, memoranda, proclamations, petitions, legislative information, maps, and photographs. These records cover the Texas Game and Fish Commission's administrative activities, finances and operations, educational material, wildlife research and findings, and federal aid to wildlife project reports. The records date 1896, 1899-1969, 1976, bulk 1928-1963.Quantity:21.5 cubic ft.Language:These materials are written in English.Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas' fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting activities and enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas' waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in 1963 (House Bill 21, 58th Legislature, Regular Session). The Texas Game and Fish Commission traces its history back to early government conservation efforts during the late 1870s. Charged with monitoring compliance to fish preservation legislation, the Texas Office of the Fish Commissioner was established in 1879 (Chapter 78, 17th Legislature, Regular Session) and lasted until 1885. In 1895 the Legislature (House Bill 55, 24th Legislature, Regular Session) authorized the creation of the Office of the Fish and Oyster Commissioner. Early duties included protecting marine life and oyster beds along Texas bays and coastal waters.

Due to growing concerns over regulating hunting and preserving wild game, a game department was added in 1907 (House Bill 379, 30th Legislature, Regular Session) and the office was renamed the Texas Office of Game, Fish, and Oyster Commissioner. This department was designated to issue hunting licenses with the idea that the department would sell enough licenses to absorb its operating costs. During 1909, the year the first hunting license law was passed in Texas, the department sold five thousand licenses. Throughout the 1910s and 1920s the Office of the Fish and Oyster Commissioner continued its conservation efforts with projects focusing on gathering specimens of native birds, promoting awareness of growing pollution problems, and exploring water sewage issues. The department grew considerably in 1923 (House Bill 85, 38th Legislature, 3rd Called Session) when the game fund was turned over to the agency (instead of remaining under the Legislature's control) and forty-five game wardens were hired. This development made the enforcement of game laws possible, and two years later the activities of the Commissioner expanded further when fish hatchery construction resumed and game sanctuaries were created. Along with these activities came a new emphasis on public education and awareness of environmental issues, and the Division of Education, Publicity, and Research was formed in 1926 to oversee publications and establish a relationship with the press.

In 1929 the Legislature (Senate Bill 83, 41st Legislature, Regular Session) eliminated the Office of the Fish and Oyster Commissioner and, in its place, created the Texas Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission. Composed of six members appointed by the governor with six-year overlapping terms, the Commission held regular quarterly meetings as well as special session meetings around the state every year. William J. Tucker was appointed the first Executive Secretary of the Commission and A.E. Wood its first Chairman. The Commission handled written and personal requests on designating areas as land preserves and changes in game laws and regulations. The Commission also made decisions about fish hatchery, oyster, and predatory animal control activities, and instituted departmental policies and reviewed departmental projects. With the 1930s came increased rebuilding of fish hatcheries and growth in the killings of predatory animals, though the Great Depression and ensuing dwindling financial resources forced the Commission to conduct departmental salary reductions and layoffs. Despite the influx of federal relief funds during the early 1930s, in 1933 the number of game wardens was reduced from one hundred twenty-five to sixty-five. Educational and research efforts continued to increase, however, and in 1935 the Texas Wildlife Research Unit was established at Texas A&M and a game warden's school was created at Texas A&M in 1946. Public outreach continued to grow as well during the 1940s, and the Commission conducted radio programs and produced a number of educational films. The Commission also replaced its monthly bulletin with Texas Game and Fish magazine, published monthly and reaching over six thousand subscribers.

In 1951 (Senate Bill 463, 52nd Legislature, Regular Session), the Commission was renamed as the Texas Game and Fish Commission and the number of commissioners was increased from six to nine. During the 1950s the Commission was organized into seven divisions. The Administrative Division handled office operations and accounting and fiscal matters; the Law Enforcement Division enforced the Commission's laws and regulations relating to game, fishing, and pollution; the Education and Publications Division produced Texas Game and Fish magazine, published educational materials, housed a library of wildlife films, and oversaw conservation courses at the university level; the Wildlife Restoration Division, in partnership with the United States Federal Aid to Wildlife Restoration Act, oversaw the Commission's projects that focused on researching restoration of wildlife; the Marine Fisheries Division managed and researched the gulf coast's marine resources; the Inland Fisheries Division monitored fish hatchery operations and conducted research and management projects; and the Sand, Shell, and Gravel Division administered the sale of sand, shell, and gravel from public waters to businesses and its distribution to the State Highway Department for use in constructing highways. By 1961 the Game and Fish Commission had been reorganized into three major divisions with five regional headquarters and twenty district headquarters, and consisted of over six hundred employees. Two years later, in 1963, the Commission merged with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (House Bill 21, 58th Legislature, Regular Session).

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In the profile of DPD officer Paul K. Wilkins in the Dealey Plaza Echos that was just posted at MF - he mentions that he was one of the first car patrol officers to arrive at the TSBD.

Parking his patrol car outside the front door, Wilkins says he went up the back steps to the Sixth Floor and saw a lot of officers from a number of different departments and agencies, including the DPD and Sheriff's Department, but also mentions "a couple of officers from the Games Management Agency."

Who were these guys?

Do we know who from the Texas Game Commission were on the Sixth Floor and whether they wrote a report on their activities there?

This must be the Texas Game Commission.

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/TT/mdttk.htmlTEXAS GAME AND FISH COMMISSION. The idea of managing the state's wildlife resources developed over several decades in the latter half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries. As the state's human population began to increase, especially after the arrival of the first railroads in the 1850s, the wildlife population began to decline. The state's first effort to regulate hunting occurred 1861, when the legislature established a two-year closed season on quail. Fishing regulations, in the form of restrictions on coastal seining and netting, were instituted in 1874. In 1879 the legislature established the office of Fish Commissioner to enforce such regulations; the office was abolished five years later because of intense controversy surrounding the introduction of German carp to Texas waterways . In 1883 130 counties in Texas claimed exemption from all game laws. By 1895, however, it had become clear that some regulatory office was needed to control the depletion caused by overfishing; in response to this need the legislature established the office of Fish and Oyster Commissioner. In 1907 the legislature also gave the commissioner the responsibility for hunting regulations, and the name of the office was changed to Game, Fish, and Oyster Commissioner. The first hunting licenses were sold in 1909. In 1919 the state had only six game wardens to enforce regulations, and many counties continued to claim exemptions; the number of wardens was increased to forty-five by 1923 and to eighty by 1928. In the 1920s the commissioner's office began developing extensive fish hatcheries in order to supplement the dwindling natural supply of fish; restocking of deer and releases of nilgai antelope began in the late 1920s and early 1930s. In 1929 the duties of the commissioner were transferred to a board-called the Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission-which was composed of six members, appointed by the governor for overlapping six-year terms. The commission appointed an executive secretary, who acted as chief executive officer. With the commission format, the agency had more stable leadership than the earlier single-commissioner style did, and as a result it became more consistent in its policy-making and enforcement. The major duties of the commission were to enforce the laws of the state pertaining to birds, game, fur-bearing animals, fish, and marine life; to issue hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses; to proclaim open seasons and bag limits on various types of game and fish; to operate fish hatcheries; to administer game preserves; to supervise the oyster beds of the state; to control the sand, shell, and gravel in the state's public waters; and to inform the public about the state's wildlife resources. In 1942 the commission began publishing Texas Game and Fish magazine, and in 1946 it began a statewide conservation education program. In 1951 the legislature expanded the commission to nine members and removed the term "oyster" from the commission's name. In 1958 the commission controlled hunting and fishing regulations in eighty counties; by 1962 hunting and fishing activities in 129 counties were under full or partial control of the commission's regulatory authority. The Texas Game and Fish Commission merged with the State Parks Board in 1963 to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Ed H. Ferguson, Jr., Ellen Schmidt, and Shirley Ratisseau Sweeney, "Let's Get Acquainted," Texas Game and Fish, October 1954-June 1955. Texas Parks and Wildlife Conservation Chronicle (Austin: Texas Parks and Wildlife, 1990).

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tslac/20151/tsl-20151.html

Texas Game and Fish Commission:

An Inventory of Game and Fish Commission Records at the Texas State Archives, 1896, 1899-1969, 1976, bulk 1928-1963

Overview

Creator:Texas. Game and Fish Commission.Title:Game and Fish Commission recordsDates:1896, 1899-1969, 1976Dates: bulk 1928-1963Abstract:The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting and fishing activities; enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in 1963. Types of records consist of minutes, correspondence, various reports, clippings and other printed materials, news releases, memoranda, proclamations, petitions, legislative information, maps, and photographs. These records cover the Texas Game and Fish Commission's administrative activities, finances and operations, educational material, wildlife research and findings, and federal aid to wildlife project reports. The records date 1896, 1899-1969, 1976, bulk 1928-1963.Quantity:21.5 cubic ft.Language:These materials are written in English.Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas' fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting activities and enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas' waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in 1963 (House Bill 21, 58th Legislature, Regular Session). The Texas Game and Fish Commission traces its history back to early government conservation efforts during the late 1870s. Charged with monitoring compliance to fish preservation legislation, the Texas Office of the Fish Commissioner was established in 1879 (Chapter 78, 17th Legislature, Regular Session) and lasted until 1885. In 1895 the Legislature (House Bill 55, 24th Legislature, Regular Session) authorized the creation of the Office of the Fish and Oyster Commissioner. Early duties included protecting marine life and oyster beds along Texas bays and coastal waters.

Due to growing concerns over regulating hunting and preserving wild game, a game department was added in 1907 (House Bill 379, 30th Legislature, Regular Session) and the office was renamed the Texas Office of Game, Fish, and Oyster Commissioner. This department was designated to issue hunting licenses with the idea that the department would sell enough licenses to absorb its operating costs. During 1909, the year the first hunting license law was passed in Texas, the department sold five thousand licenses. Throughout the 1910s and 1920s the Office of the Fish and Oyster Commissioner continued its conservation efforts with projects focusing on gathering specimens of native birds, promoting awareness of growing pollution problems, and exploring water sewage issues. The department grew considerably in 1923 (House Bill 85, 38th Legislature, 3rd Called Session) when the game fund was turned over to the agency (instead of remaining under the Legislature's control) and forty-five game wardens were hired. This development made the enforcement of game laws possible, and two years later the activities of the Commissioner expanded further when fish hatchery construction resumed and game sanctuaries were created. Along with these activities came a new emphasis on public education and awareness of environmental issues, and the Division of Education, Publicity, and Research was formed in 1926 to oversee publications and establish a relationship with the press.

In 1929 the Legislature (Senate Bill 83, 41st Legislature, Regular Session) eliminated the Office of the Fish and Oyster Commissioner and, in its place, created the Texas Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission. Composed of six members appointed by the governor with six-year overlapping terms, the Commission held regular quarterly meetings as well as special session meetings around the state every year. William J. Tucker was appointed the first Executive Secretary of the Commission and A.E. Wood its first Chairman. The Commission handled written and personal requests on designating areas as land preserves and changes in game laws and regulations. The Commission also made decisions about fish hatchery, oyster, and predatory animal control activities, and instituted departmental policies and reviewed departmental projects. With the 1930s came increased rebuilding of fish hatcheries and growth in the killings of predatory animals, though the Great Depression and ensuing dwindling financial resources forced the Commission to conduct departmental salary reductions and layoffs. Despite the influx of federal relief funds during the early 1930s, in 1933 the number of game wardens was reduced from one hundred twenty-five to sixty-five. Educational and research efforts continued to increase, however, and in 1935 the Texas Wildlife Research Unit was established at Texas A&M and a game warden's school was created at Texas A&M in 1946. Public outreach continued to grow as well during the 1940s, and the Commission conducted radio programs and produced a number of educational films. The Commission also replaced its monthly bulletin with Texas Game and Fish magazine, published monthly and reaching over six thousand subscribers.

In 1951 (Senate Bill 463, 52nd Legislature, Regular Session), the Commission was renamed as the Texas Game and Fish Commission and the number of commissioners was increased from six to nine. During the 1950s the Commission was organized into seven divisions. The Administrative Division handled office operations and accounting and fiscal matters; the Law Enforcement Division enforced the Commission's laws and regulations relating to game, fishing, and pollution; the Education and Publications Division produced Texas Game and Fish magazine, published educational materials, housed a library of wildlife films, and oversaw conservation courses at the university level; the Wildlife Restoration Division, in partnership with the United States Federal Aid to Wildlife Restoration Act, oversaw the Commission's projects that focused on researching restoration of wildlife; the Marine Fisheries Division managed and researched the gulf coast's marine resources; the Inland Fisheries Division monitored fish hatchery operations and conducted research and management projects; and the Sand, Shell, and Gravel Division administered the sale of sand, shell, and gravel from public waters to businesses and its distribution to the State Highway Department for use in constructing highways. By 1961 the Game and Fish Commission had been reorganized into three major divisions with five regional headquarters and twenty district headquarters, and consisted of over six hundred employees. Two years later, in 1963, the Commission merged with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (House Bill 21, 58th Legislature, Regular Session).

Bill

The only thing that springs to mind is an endangered species(The Patsy) under threat.But this would mean foreknowledge of Oswalds Imminent demise.

Ian

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People prob wont like this much but there were large areas throughout the south that primarily were such things as waterways, swamps et.c. that had horrific stories connected with them, from haunted swamps where up to 2000 black families had been driven, not to return. Emmett Till thrown, weighted down, into a river,''n hunts'', White Rock lake in Dallas ( a KKK stronghold) having some gruesome tales about strange night rituals and concrete feet, later when the mississippi three were searched for numerous and various bodyparts were found, reasonably indicating the water systems had a long tradition as dumping grounds.

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So, According to one of the first uniformed police officers to enter the TSBD after the assassination, when he arrived on the sixth floor there were law enforcement officers from many agencies and departments, including two from the Game Management Agency, or officially known as the Game Commission, which regulates hunting and wildlife.

This is news to me, and I'd like to identify these two guys, if possible.

BK

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  • 2 weeks later...

So, According to one of the first uniformed police officers to enter the TSBD after the assassination, when he arrived on the sixth floor there were law enforcement officers from many agencies and departments, including two from the Game Management Agency, or officially known as the Game Commission, which regulates hunting and wildlife.

This is news to me, and I'd like to identify these two guys, if possible.

BK

I remember when it was news that the Texas Department of Public Safety was assigned for presidential security on November 22, 1963. Even maryferrell.org

does not seem to have any information on the Game Management Agency and that database, is supposed to have over 30,000 listings.

Below is what I have, more or less.

85. Commission Document 81.1 - AG Texas 418 pages

page 2 begins with The Walker File

page 29 marks the beginning of Section C

page 32 mentions that there were a total of 493 members of the Dallas Police Department assigned in one way or another to duties pertaining to President Kennedy's trip to Dallas on

11/26/63, with the qualifier that of that number were 46 men from the Texas Department of Public Safety and 14 men from the Sheriff's Department who were to be used for security at the Trade Mart. The breakdown is as follows:

56 men assigned to security at Love Field

173 men assigned for traffic and security along the parade route

190 men assigned for security inside the Trade Mart Building

74 men assigned for security and traffic outside the Trade Mart Building

see

http://www.maryferre...84&relPageId=32

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http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/TT/mctrp.html

''TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY. The Texas Department of Public Safety was established by the Texas legislature on August 10, 1935 (ed: coinciding with Alabama dps), to enforce laws to protect public safety and to provide for crime prevention and detection. A three-member Public Safety Commission, appointed by the governor for six-year terms, oversaw the department and in turn named the director and assistant director. Originally department operations were classified into six divisions: the Texas Highway Patrol, Texas Rangersqv, Bureau of Communications, Bureau of Intelligence, Bureau of Education, and Bureau of Identification and Records. In 1937 the state licensing of drivers was added to the tasks of the department, as was the first narcotics section. The driver-license section expanded in 1941 with the addition of an accident-record section, later evolving into the Statistical Division (1946). By the early 1950s still more driver-related duties were added, with the enactments of the Motor Vehicle Inspection Act and the Safety Responsibility Act. In 1957 the Department of Public Safety underwent a major reorganization, which included consolidation into four major divisions: Identification and Criminal Records, Personnel and Staff Services, Driver and Vehicle Records, and Inspection and Planning. In 1963 the department also became responsible for the State Civil Defense Office (later the Division of Emergency Management), established to aid local governments during times of natural disaster or social upheaval...''

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There was.......one interesting item I did find however, and before I go on to mention it, it has become increasingly noticeable over the last, well, awhile....that every single topic that appears to be related to the threads I am actively working on, has a very deep history.....

Example, on the Oswald in Russia/Bernstein threads, if you have read Secret Intelligence by Ernest Volkman and Blaine Bagget; the Chapter

entitled On The Road To Shevogarsk, you discover that the British and United States had troops in Russia, fighting the Bolsheviks, this is important when you consider

some of the persons on that thread. As well as the fact that ONI was involved in this particular aspect of history.

I suppose with the Operation Valkyrie Thread, something not commonly known was the Alsos Mission, which was connected to Colonel Boris Pash, and there were

lots of interesting people who connect with the ahem, dare I say, military industrial complex. Mary Ferrell's website has at least one, if not more documents on Boris,

and the Alsos Mission is also prominent in the book Harnessing the Genie......

With the Paines and the Quaker world pre-1963, and in this book the Paines are not mentioned by name, there is a very strange book that came out in 1963,

entitled The Day They Shook The Plum Tree, it has some very bizarre sections in it, that I believe make it of interest to those interested in the JFK assassination.

With this thread, it is a little more complicated. Although, as I said there was not a document that linked with the subject of this thread.

I did find something, on August 14, 1966 the following headline appeared in the Dallas Morning News.

Shelby Kritser Killed in Airplane Accident

Some of the facts associated with Krister were:

He had been active in the aviation business since 1941 in Amarillo.

Prior to 1941 he was an assistant engineering officer for Pan American

Airways for four years.

In 1952 Krister was named to fill the unexpired term of Gene Howe

of Amarillo on the Texas Game and Fish Commission

He was President of Trade-Wind Aircraft Corp., owners and operators

of the Tradewind Airport here, [Dallas]

He had piloted aircraft for 30 years.

Pan American Airways is usually associated with Juan Trippe, which is another

subject in itself.

In 1963 Juan Trippe was also on the board of the National Geographic Society, I have a post somewhere

on the Forum that mentions who also was on that Board, I believe it was the

One of The Good Guys Loren Coleman, thread.

Where it gets interesting, if your familiar with the words Trade-Winds, one there is coincidentally,

a lot of Trade-Wind's Motel, Restaurant, etc...in the WC Documents, which is probably a

coincidence,

BUT, in a list that is known as CIA proprietaries, there are

two listings......

* Trade Winds Motel (part of National Intelligence Agency, and sharing the same name as Operation

* Trade Winds, a project involving Robert Peloquin an Robert Vesco interests), see

Jim Hougan, Spooks

Robert

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There was.......one interesting item I did find however, and before I go on to mention it, it has become increasingly noticeable over the last, well, awhile....that every single topic that appears to be related to the threads I am actively working on, has a very deep history.....

Example, on the Oswald in Russia/Bernstein threads, if you have read Secret Intelligence by Ernest Volkman and Blaine Bagget; the Chapter

entitled On The Road To Shevogarsk, you discover that the British and United States had troops in Russia, fighting the Bolsheviks, this is important when you consider

some of the persons on that thread. As well as the fact that ONI was involved in this particular aspect of history.

I suppose with the Operation Valkyrie Thread, something not commonly known was the Alsos Mission, which was connected to Colonel Boris Pash, and there were

lots of interesting people who connect with the ahem, dare I say, military industrial complex. Mary Ferrell's website has at least one, if not more documents on Boris,

and the Alsos Mission is also prominent in the book Harnessing the Genie......

With the Paines and the Quaker world pre-1963, and in this book the Paines are not mentioned by name, there is a very strange book that came out in 1963,

entitled The Day They Shook The Plum Tree, it has some very bizarre sections in it, that I believe make it of interest to those interested in the JFK assassination.

With this thread, it is a little more complicated. Although, as I said there was not a document that linked with the subject of this thread.

I did find something, on August 14, 1966 the following headline appeared in the Dallas Morning News.

Shelby Kritser Killed in Airplane Accident

Some of the facts associated with Krister were:

He had been active in the aviation business since 1941 in Amarillo.

Prior to 1941 he was an assistant engineering officer for Pan American

Airways for four years.

In 1952 Krister was named to fill the unexpired term of Gene Howe

of Amarillo on the Texas Game and Fish Commission

He was President of Trade-Wind Aircraft Corp., owners and operators

of the Tradewind Airport here, [Dallas]

He had piloted aircraft for 30 years.

Pan American Airways is usually associated with Juan Trippe, which is another

subject in itself.

In 1963 Juan Trippe was also on the board of the National Geographic Society, I have a post somewhere

on the Forum that mentions who also was on that Board, I believe it was the

One of The Good Guys Loren Coleman, thread.

Where it gets interesting, if your familiar with the words Trade-Winds, one there is coincidentally,

a lot of Trade-Wind's Motel, Restaurant, etc...in the WC Documents, which is probably a

coincidence,

BUT, in a list that is known as CIA proprietaries, there are

two listings......

* Trade Winds Motel (part of National Intelligence Agency, and sharing the same name as Operation

* Trade Winds, a project involving Robert Peloquin an Robert Vesco interests), see

Jim Hougan, Spooks

Robert

Get ready for the proverbial kitchen sink.......

According to the 1964 Compton Yearbook, ie Encyclopedia for the year

1963, Fish and Wildlife agencies fell under the domain of the

The Department of the Interior formed in 1849 page 583-84;

In 1963, the Secretary of the Interior was Morris W. Udall

Specifically, "The United Fish and Wildlife Service was comprised of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries and

the Bureau of Sports Fisheries and Wildlife."

While firearms fell under the domain of the Post Office Department.

Obviously, there were other areas of government more traditionally

associated with firearms, such as the Dodd Committee, the FBI

and ATF.

Interestingly, under the topic of Hunting, in Colliers, there was a passage

that read..."Following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

in November 1963 a clamor arose for stricter laws regualting the sale of

firearms. His death spotlighted the ease with which deadly weapons

of all kinds could be bought

ibid page 155

Anybody have any info (BuNo) on this Bearcat, fatally wrecked in Amarillo, TX in 1966?

Warbirds Directory #1 has

58-63 J.W Dorr- Orinda, Ca

65-66 W. Fuller-Fort Worth, Tx

Crashed and destroyed Amarillo AFB, Tx 8-13-66

Here is the NTSB report form the accident:

http://www.ntsb.gov/...id=23955&key=0#

This link is not working

The CAF's Bearcat is N7825C (Bu122674)

Amarillo News-Globe August 14, 1966 wrote:

Tragedy terminated Aviation Day activities at Amarillo Air Terminal Saturday afternoon when Shelby M. Krister, a well-known veteran Amarillo flier, crashed and died before a crowd of about 2000 persons. His WWII Grumman F8F Bearcat knifed into the edge of a runway and exploded in an orange-red ball of roaring flame.

The tragedy occurred at 2:32 pm about 200 yards from two grandstands crowded with persons on hand for the aerial demonstrations.

Krister, 52, who was president of Tradewind Aviation and chairman of the Texas Aeronautics Commision completed a series of intricate and difficult manouvers with the plane before attempting the one which cost him his life - a hammerhead stall.

Krister brought the Navy fighter in low over the field and went into a vertical climb, executing a 360-degree roll as he approached stalling speed. At the top of the stall, he slid off into a fluttering spin with his power off. He was able to recover from the spin, but his 2350 horsepower Pratt & Whitney engine apparently failed him and he could not recover from his dive.

Persons watched the stubby black plane crash and burn with unbelieving horror. A red emergency fire truck raced to the crash scene and the crew began extinguishing the fire with chemical foam. They quickly had it under control.

Krister was killed in his second performance of the day. In the morning, he had given a brilliant performance in a Bucker Jungmann biplane.

In 1937, Krister joined Pan American Airways as an apprentice engineer in the Atlantic Division. He served on the Bermuda-United States route for about a year, then, after attending school in Seattle, was assigned as assistant engineering officer on the famed Yankee Clipper.

In the Church Committee Files, under the heading

Volume 1 - Hearings on Unauthorized Storage of Toxic Agents

Current Section: 11. List of persons who received toxins from Fort Detrick

was Dr. Wayne I Jensen [botulinum Toxin]

U.S. Dept. of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

P.O. Box 459

Bear River Research Station

Brigham City, Utah

See

http://www.maryferre...3&relPageId=230

DODD, THOMAS J. (SEN.)

Sources: WC Vol 24, p. 852; Oswald: Assassin or Fall Guy? Joesten, p. 79; The Last Investigation, Fonzi, p. 237; Spy Saga, Melanson, p. 59; JFK & Vietnam, Newman, pp. 92-93; Crime & Coverup, Scott, p. 8; Deep Politics, Scott, pp. 215-216, 370; Official & Confidential, Summers, p. 196; Espionage Establishment, Wise & Ross, pp. 56-57; Cuban Invasion, Meyer, p. 38

Mary's

Comments: The Dodd bill was attempting to control guns. Speculation that LHO was attempting to help Dodd get the bill passed.

Another Krister articles

DMN Private Pilot Future in Texas Said Bright; September 28, 1961; Page 4

The Vice-Chairman of the Texas Aeronautics Commission presented

an optimistic picture to Dallas flying enthusiasts this week about the

private pilot's future in Texas.

Shelby Kritser, general manager of the Amarillo Globe-News

Publishing Co and an active pilot said at a recent luncheon

Shelby Kritser Killed in Airplane Accident; August 14, 1966

Shelby Krister, 52, chairman of the Texas Aeronautics Commission

and former general manager of the Amarillo Globe News Publishing Co.,

plunged to his death in an airplane accident Saturday.

Krister was flying an FBF Bearcat in an airshow watched by several

thousand persons. He was doing a power-off stall maneuver at about 600

feet, and apparently did not regain enough power soon enough to pull

out of the dive. The Bearcat was the last propellor-driven plane to be

developed by the Navy during World War II. Krister, prominent member

of a Panhandle ranching family, was appointed to the Texas Aeronautics

Commission in 1959 by then Gov. Price Daniel. He was reappointed to a

second six-year term last November by Gov. John Connally.

He was President of Trade-Wind Aircraft Corp., owners and operators

of the Tradewind Airport here, [Dallas]

He was active in the aviation business since 1941 in Amarillo.

Prior to 1941 he was an assistant engineering officer for Pan American

Airways for four years.

He was General Manager of the Globe News from 1952 until this year

and remained as a consultant to the newspaper.

Krister had piloted aircraft for 30 years and held an air-transport rating,

highest given by the Federal Aviation Agency.

In 1952 he was named to fill the unexpired term of Gene Howe*

of Amarillo on the Texas Game and Fish Commission, and in 1956

was appointed to the Texas Tourism Commission.

His widow, a son, Sloan, and a daughter survive.

Services will be at 11:00 a.m. Monday in Amarillo.

DMN October 7, 1953

Shiver appoints three to Game and Fish

Austin, Texas Three new members were appointed to

the Texas Game and Fish Commission by Governor Shivers Tuesday.

They are Henry Coffield, rancher and former mayor of Marfa;

Henry LeBlanc, Standard Brass Manufacturing Co., and President

of the Port Arthur Hunting Club, and Herbert J. Frensley, formerly with the Texas Employment

Commission and now with Brown and Root Construction Company

They succeed Richard M. Kleberg, Jr., Kingsville, Shelby Kistler, Amarillo

and V.F. (Doc) Neuhaus, McAllen. Their terms extend to September 1, 1959

DMN June 29, 1952 Krister To Head Game Commission

Austin Texas, June 28

Shelby Krister of Amarillo was named Saturday to fill the unexpired term

of the late Gene Howe on the Texas Game and Fish Commission.

Krister, Howe's son-in-law was closely associated with him in

game conservation matters, an announcement from Gov. Allen Shiver's office

said. Krister is the manger of the Amarillo Daily News. Howe's term would have expired

on September 1, 1953

DMN May 23, 1928; Vote Merger of Oil Scouts;

others motored to the Sloan Krister Ranch for a stag barbeque

DMN August 31, 1948 Tough Cousin of D.D.T. Kills Insects

.....but Dr C.J. Krister, with E.I. Du Pont Nemours & Co., said it is the least toxin harmful to plants

Possible Inter-relationships

ARNOLD ----- SAGALYN

CE 1654; CD 219 Director, Office of Law Enforcement Coordination, United States Treasury Department

MADDOX, AL -----

Sources: -----

Mary's

Comments: Former "partner" of Buddy Walthers. Opened Special Services International (detective agency) with R. E. "Bob" Hickman.

CLARY, H. P.

Sources: 1/14/64 Memo from Alcohol and Tobacco Tax, to Forrest Sorrels.

Mary's

Comments: Chief, Enforcement Branch, A&TT, 1114 Commerce Street, Dallas, TX 214 749-2854. Participated in search of TSBD 11/22/63.

although Paul Wilkins doesnt appear in Larry Sneed's No More Silence, he is mentioned in the account given by Donald Flutsche See pages 457-458

Donald Flusche..."When I got up to the sixth floor, there were several other people, mostly in plain-clothes. I can't recall the names

of those I saw, but I found out later that most of them were federal officers, either from ATF, or Federal Game Enforcement.

I thought this was rather unusual because why were they so involved in all of this, especially since murder, even a president, at that time was a

state crime, thus it was our crime and our investigation that would have to be conducted. There was some confusion on the part of

the people there as to what their roles should be in this thing.

END

Robert: It is interesting to me that Roy Westphal, who was also with Flutsche and Wilkins on the sixth floor at that time, does not make any reference to

the Game and Fish Commission, when interviewed for No More Silence, whereas both the former did mention it. Oh well, age does impair cognitive skills

BTW Westphal was head of the Criminal Intelligence Division, which did intertwine with several different law enforcement agencies

http://www.tshaonlin...s/TT/mdttk.html

TEXAS GAME AND FISH COMMISSION. The idea of managing the state's wildlife resources developed over several decades in the latter half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries. As the state's human population began to increase, especially after the arrival of the first railroads in the 1850s, the wildlife population began to decline. The state's first effort to regulate hunting occurred 1861, when the legislature established a two-year closed season on quail. Fishing regulations, in the form of restrictions on coastal seining and netting, were instituted in 1874. In 1879 the legislature established the office of Fish Commissioner to enforce such regulations; the office was abolished five years later because of intense controversy surrounding the introduction of German carp to Texas waterways . In 1883 130 counties in Texas claimed exemption from all game laws. By 1895, however, it had become clear that some regulatory office was needed to control the depletion caused by overfishing; in response to this need the legislature established the office of Fish and Oyster Commissioner. In 1907 the legislature also gave the commissioner the responsibility for hunting regulations, and the name of the office was changed to Game, Fish, and Oyster Commissioner. The first hunting licenses were sold in 1909. In 1919 the state had only six game wardens to enforce regulations, and many counties continued to claim exemptions; the number of wardens was increased to forty-five by 1923 and to eighty by 1928. In the 1920s the commissioner's office began developing extensive fish hatcheries in order to supplement the dwindling natural supply of fish; restocking of deer and releases of nilgai antelope began in the late 1920s and early 1930s. In 1929 the duties of the commissioner were transferred to a board-called the Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission-which was composed of six members, appointed by the governor for overlapping six-year terms. The commission appointed an executive secretary, who acted as chief executive officer. With the commission format, the agency had more stable leadership than the earlier single-commissioner style did, and as a result it became more consistent in its policy-making and enforcement. The major duties of the commission were to enforce the laws of the state pertaining to birds, game, fur-bearing animals, fish, and marine life; to issue hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses; to proclaim open seasons and bag limits on various types of game and fish; to operate fish hatcheries; to administer game preserves; to supervise the oyster beds of the state; to control the sand, shell, and gravel in the state's public waters; and to inform the public about the state's wildlife resources. In 1942 the commission began publishing Texas Game and Fish magazine, and in 1946 it began a statewide conservation education program. In 1951 the legislature expanded the commission to nine members and removed the term "oyster" from the commission's name. In 1958 the commission controlled hunting and fishing regulations in eighty counties; by 1962 hunting and fishing activities in 129 counties were under full or partial control of the commission's regulatory authority. The Texas Game and Fish Commission merged with the State Parks Board in 1963 to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Ed H. Ferguson, Jr., Ellen Schmidt, and Shirley Ratisseau Sweeney, "Let's Get Acquainted," Texas Game and Fish, October 1954-June 1955. Texas Parks and Wildlife Conservation Chronicle (Austin: Texas Parks and Wildlife, 1990).

KENNETH ----- HOWE

FBI agent. Saw LHO's note to Hosty.

WILLIAM WAYNE HOWE

Sources: CD 1528b Mary's Comments: He and his wife offered a home to Marina Oswald and her children. He was employed by Pitney-Bowes, 1410 L St., NW, Wash., DC

CHEEVER, BRUCE BISSELL

Sources: Dirty Work 2, Ray, p. 330; State Dept. Biographic Register, 1969; CU-313

Mary's

Comments: William King Harvey's Deputy (CU-313). DOB: 2/2/16; POB: Illinois. Received BA from Univ. of Washington in 1938. U.S. Marine Corps 1938-1946 - Overseas, Lieutenant Colonel. 1946-1948, Associate at Univ. of Washington. Received MA from Univ. of Washington in 1948. 1948-1950, Instructor at Western Washington College of Education. 1950-1953, Special Assistant, Dept. of the Navy. July 1953, Dept. of State, Stockholm, Sweden, Attache & political officer (CIA Chief of Station). 1956-1967, Unspecified government experience (Wm. King Harvey's Deputy in 1961 - CU 313). Jan. 1968, Dept of State, Pretoria, South Africa, First Secretary and Political Officer. As of Sept. 1968, Chief of Station. As of Feb. 1972, No entry in Dept. of State Records. Wife: Helen Howe.

And if you think any of this is interesting, you will be amazed at what you are about to read in the context of the above.

Juan Trippe, the Yale graduate who created the Pan American empire.

Juan Trippe was born into a wealthy banking family, descended from English seafarers who settled on the Maryland coast in the 1600s. He was educated in the finest schools (though he was, at best, an average student) and was graduated from Yale in 1919 after an active collegiate and extra-collegiate career that included playing on the football team, a brief stint as a navy flier in the war, reporting for the Yale newspaper on the NC flights of 1919, and starting a flying club.

As a businessman, Trippe regarded competition as an annoyance—he either joined forces with his competitors to create an even more powerful corporation or brushed them aside. Trippe was very comfortable in the world of high finance and the government movers and shakers, yet he did not hesitate to use the Spanish flavour of his name (even though he hated the name)—given to him by his mother who had expected to give birth to a girl whom she had wanted to name after a favorite Aunt Juanita— to open doors for him in Latin America.

The Sikorsky 5-42, the 32-passenger flying boat that pioneered Pan Am's routes to South America and the South Pacific in the 1930s.

Trippe saw himself and his company as instruments of American foreign policy in Latin America and in the Pacific. He engaged Lindbergh as a technical advisor and rubbed elbows with virtually every power broker and politico of influence to further not only the interests of Pan Am, but also of the entire American presence in the air. Some admired him and considered him a patriot; at least as many despised him and viewed him a megalomaniacal cut-throat and robber-baron. But the entire aviation community had to acknowledge that Trippe created the largest and best-run distance airline in the world during the four decades of his stewardship.

His first effort in airline-building was a small ferry line that ran from Long Island, New York, to various mountain resorts; this airline used war surplus navy planes. He spent a great deal of time studying the history of the railroads and applied many of the techniques of the great railroad builders—fair and otherwise—to the air transport industry. In 1922 he formed Colonial Air Transport, which was awarded a CAM contract for carrying mail between New York and Boston.

In 1927 Trippe won a contract for an air mail run from Florida to Havana, even though he had no planes to fly and two other airlines already operating in the Southeast were run by respected airmen like Eddie Rickenbacker and H.H. "Hap" Arnold. Trippe accomplished this magic by convincing the Cuban dictator Garado Machad to allow only his airline to land in Havana. Industry observers thought it particularly cheeky of Trippe to adopt the name of Arnold's operation, Pan American, when he forced that flier's company out of 71 business and took over the company's airplanes. Over the next decade, Trippe expanded farther out into Latin America and into the Pacific.

At each step, he cultivated a friendship with aircraft builders and encouraged them to build better, more powerful, and more luxurious aircraft. He would make large purchases, for which the manufacturers were grateful. Yet Trippe dealt with a variety of manufacturers and kept all of them guessing (along with his Board in which direction he was going to go. He viewed with alarm the inroads LuftHansa and its parent company, Condor Syndicate, were making in Latin America, and overtly made his efforts to establish commercial air dominance in the region a geopolitical matter. Many flights and activities of Pan Am during the prewar period were nothing short of espionage or diplomatic missions carried out for the State Department.

Pan Am encouraged Boeing to build large wide-body planes for land use: the Stratocruiser, inaugurated in 1949, made the New York—to -Paris flight in under ten hours, establishing once and for all the viability of the wide-body air transport.

Trippe first used Fokker Trimotor F-7s, equipped with the best Wright engines, for the Key West—Havana run in 1927. In 1928 these planes were joined by Sikorsky S-38 amphibian planes with Wasp engines. When Pan Am opened routes to Mexico and Central America in 1929, it used a fleet of Fort 5-AT-B Trimotors, the most expensive and advanced commercial plane of its day, and when Pan Am acquired Ralph O'Neil's New York—Rio de Janeiro—Buenos Aires Air Line (NYRBA, and known popularly as "Near Beer"), the new owner commandeered its fleet of fourteen Consolidated Commodore flying boats and flew them on the first Pan Am routes to South America beginning in 1930. Trippe's "secret weapon" in all the development of air routes was his chief pilot, Edwin C. "Eddie" Musick, a veteran Navy flier who built a training, communication, and weather forecasting and reporting system that was unmatched in aviation for decades.

Musick flew ahead to stake out the best landing facilities, establish communication relays and weather stations, and plan the best routes and schedules. His contribution was acknowledged by Trippe to be the key to Pan Am's success in South America and the Pacific. (Musick died in 1938 while on a scouting mission for Pan Am near Pago Pago in the Pacific; he was flying the Samoan Clipper, a Sikorsky S-42B aircraft.)

It was clear by then that a leap in airplane design was going to be required if commercial aviation was to be extended further. Trippe worked closely with Sikorsky in creating the S-40, the first of the "Clipper" flying boats (so named by Trippe himself). The first of the S-40s, the Caribbean Clipper, began service in 1931 (it was christened by Mrs. Herbert Hoover in a ceremony on the Potomac River) and was followed by the American Clipper.

The Pan Am seaplanes (here, the Boeing Atlantic Clipper) were virtually flying luxury hotels, with spacious accommodations for fifty to seventy-five passengers

These aircraft carried forty passengers and were equipped with four Pratt & Whitney Hornet engines that churned out 575 horsepower each and kept the seven- teen-ton (15.5t) mammoth flying at a cruising speed of 117 miles per hour (l88kph)—not very fast for so much horsepower, but the planes were built for luxury and safety, not speed. The plane looked like something assembled from different aircraft—the wing, the empennage (tail assembly), the engines, and the fuselage were held together by struts and wires—but it flew reliably and efficiently.

In 1934 Sikorsky stunned the aviation world by building an even better and more luxurious clipper: the S- 42. This time, the nacelles (the engine and propeller housings) were built into the wing so that the wing could be mounted just over the fuselage. The craft still relied on pontoons extending down from each wing for balance in the water, but the entire aircraft was sleeker, which accounted for its cruising speed's going up to 140 miles per hour (225kph). Meanwhile Trippe had joined forces with the W.R. Grace Company, which had formerly been a bitter rival, to form a subsidiary airline, Panagra, that would service the west coasts of North and South America.

Eyeing the Japanese expansion into the Pacific as yet another threat to the United States, he expanded Pan Am into the Pacific in 1935. For this, he needed yet another new Clipper: the M- 130, built by Glenn Martin (who took Sikorsky's S-42 as his starting point). This aircraft was even larger than the S-42 and was more luxuriously appointed. Its main advantage, however, was that it more than doubled the nonstop range of the S-42—three thousand miles (4,827km) com- pared with twelve hundred miles (1,931km). It was an M-130, the China Clipper, that became the most famous of the Pan Am flying boats in the 1930s. Pan Am ordered several smaller Clipper aircraft— some from Sikorsky, who manufactured the twin-engine "baby clippers," and others from Donald Douglas, who built the Dolphin, an eight-passenger flying boat that saw a great deal of service in the routes from the United States to China.

The grandest Clipper was still to come in 1939, in the form of the Boeing B-3 14, the largest and most powerful of the Clipper aircraft, and the one that proved most profitable, with a passenger capacity of more than seventy (plus a crew of up to sixteen). The B-3 14, of which only a dozen were built, represented the pinnacle of flying luxury. It contained sleeping quarters, fine dining rooms and bar lounges, deluxe suites and powder rooms, and a walkway inside the wings that allowed engineers to make in-flight repairs.

Another famous Pan Am aircraft, the Yankee Clipper, was a B-3 14. The Europeans were hard pressed to keep up with Pan Am's aircraft builders. England's Short Company built the Empire, a clipperlike aircraft and a flying-boat—mail- carrying-seaplane combination that was intended to carry both mail and passengers across the Atlantic; it saw limited service in Europe and in the Atlantic before the late 193Os, when Pan Am finally turned its attention there.

The Germans built ever larger flying boats, beginning with the Dornier Wals flying boats of the early 1920's and culminating in the gigantic Dornier Do X, an aircraft that dwarfed anything else then in the air. This plane had twelve engines mounted in six pairs atop a 157-foot (48m) wing. It carried 169 passengers in unparalleled luxury. The maiden voyage of the Do X in the spring of 1931 took so long and was plagued by so many problems that support for the plane among investors dried up amid jokes the media made of the plane. Claude Dornier, builder-designer of the Do X, was forced to donate the plane to a museum.

The Dornier Do X over Lake Constance in 1930. Like the airships that flew from the same lake, the Do X teas designed and operated more like an ocean liner than an airplane—the plush furniture, for example, was not attached to the floor. After a promotional tour of Europe and South America, the aircraft never flew commercially and was retired to a museum in Berlin where it was destroyed by bombing during the War.

The Do X was not the biggest of the 1930s aircraft to fly: that distinction goes to a Russian land-based aircraft, the Tupolev ANT-20, only one of which was built, the Maxim Gorky. Dubbed by Western journalists the "propaganda plane" (and called by some the Maximum Gawky), the ANT-20 was an immense needle of an airplane with a wingspan of 210 feet and powered by eight engines: six designed into the wing and a pair mounted above the fuselage. In flight, the Maxim Gorky was magnificent; it was also used effectively by the Soviets in many military parades. The Maxim Gorky crashed in May 1935 during a ceremonial flight, when an escort airplane crashed into its wing. The plane came apart in the air and none of the forty people aboard survived. The incident finally caused the aviation community to question the wisdom of building larger and larger aircraft.

The Russians produced the giant ANT-20, the Maxim Gorky (with money raised by the Soviet writers union), an eight-engine aircraft that seemed to have had only propaganda value. It was destroyed when an escort plane (piloted by a flier showing oft) crashed into it.

http://www.century-o...er%20ships3.htm

So I guess you could say everything is connected, at least in the world of intelligence operations.

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There was.......one interesting item I did find however, and before I go on to mention it, it has become increasingly noticeable over the last, well, awhile....that every single topic that appears to be related to the threads I am actively working on, has a very deep history.....

Example, on the Oswald in Russia/Bernstein threads, if you have read Secret Intelligence by Ernest Volkman and Blaine Bagget; the Chapter

entitled On The Road To Shevogarsk, you discover that the British and United States had troops in Russia, fighting the Bolsheviks, this is important when you consider

some of the persons on that thread. As well as the fact that ONI was involved in this particular aspect of history.

I suppose with the Operation Valkyrie Thread, something not commonly known was the Alsos Mission, which was connected to Colonel Boris Pash, and there were

lots of interesting people who connect with the ahem, dare I say, military industrial complex. Mary Ferrell's website has at least one, if not more documents on Boris,

and the Alsos Mission is also prominent in the book Harnessing the Genie......

With the Paines and the Quaker world pre-1963, and in this book the Paines are not mentioned by name, there is a very strange book that came out in 1963,

entitled The Day They Shook The Plum Tree, it has some very bizarre sections in it, that I believe make it of interest to those interested in the JFK assassination.

With this thread, it is a little more complicated. Although, as I said there was not a document that linked with the subject of this thread.

I did find something, on August 14, 1966 the following headline appeared in the Dallas Morning News.

Shelby Kritser Killed in Airplane Accident

Some of the facts associated with Krister were:

He had been active in the aviation business since 1941 in Amarillo.

Prior to 1941 he was an assistant engineering officer for Pan American

Airways for four years.

In 1952 Krister was named to fill the unexpired term of Gene Howe

of Amarillo on the Texas Game and Fish Commission

He was President of Trade-Wind Aircraft Corp., owners and operators

of the Tradewind Airport here, [Dallas]

He had piloted aircraft for 30 years.

Pan American Airways is usually associated with Juan Trippe, which is another

subject in itself.

In 1963 Juan Trippe was also on the board of the National Geographic Society, I have a post somewhere

on the Forum that mentions who also was on that Board, I believe it was the

One of The Good Guys Loren Coleman, thread.

Where it gets interesting, if your familiar with the words Trade-Winds, one there is coincidentally,

a lot of Trade-Wind's Motel, Restaurant, etc...in the WC Documents, which is probably a

coincidence,

BUT, in a list that is known as CIA proprietaries, there are

two listings......

* Trade Winds Motel (part of National Intelligence Agency, and sharing the same name as Operation

* Trade Winds, a project involving Robert Peloquin an Robert Vesco interests), see

Jim Hougan, Spooks

Robert

Get ready for the proverbial kitchen sink.......

According to the 1964 Compton Yearbook, ie Encyclopedia for the year

1963, Fish and Wildlife agencies fell under the domain of the

The Department of the Interior formed in 1849 page 583-84;

In 1963, the Secretary of the Interior was Morris W. Udall

Specifically, "The United Fish and Wildlife Service was comprised of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries and

the Bureau of Sports Fisheries and Wildlife."

While firearms fell under the domain of the Post Office Department.

Obviously, there were other areas of government more traditionally

associated with firearms, such as the Dodd Committee, the FBI

and ATF.

Interestingly, under the topic of Hunting, in Colliers, there was a passage

that read..."Following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

in November 1963 a clamor arose for stricter laws regualting the sale of

firearms. His death spotlighted the ease with which deadly weapons

of all kinds could be bought

ibid page 155

Anybody have any info (BuNo) on this Bearcat, fatally wrecked in Amarillo, TX in 1966?

Warbirds Directory #1 has

58-63 J.W Dorr- Orinda, Ca

65-66 W. Fuller-Fort Worth, Tx

Crashed and destroyed Amarillo AFB, Tx 8-13-66

Here is the NTSB report form the accident:

http://www.ntsb.gov/...id=23955&key=0#

This link is not working

The CAF's Bearcat is N7825C (Bu122674)

Amarillo News-Globe August 14, 1966 wrote:

Tragedy terminated Aviation Day activities at Amarillo Air Terminal Saturday afternoon when Shelby M. Krister, a well-known veteran Amarillo flier, crashed and died before a crowd of about 2000 persons. His WWII Grumman F8F Bearcat knifed into the edge of a runway and exploded in an orange-red ball of roaring flame.

The tragedy occurred at 2:32 pm about 200 yards from two grandstands crowded with persons on hand for the aerial demonstrations.

Krister, 52, who was president of Tradewind Aviation and chairman of the Texas Aeronautics Commision completed a series of intricate and difficult manouvers with the plane before attempting the one which cost him his life - a hammerhead stall.

Krister brought the Navy fighter in low over the field and went into a vertical climb, executing a 360-degree roll as he approached stalling speed. At the top of the stall, he slid off into a fluttering spin with his power off. He was able to recover from the spin, but his 2350 horsepower Pratt & Whitney engine apparently failed him and he could not recover from his dive.

Persons watched the stubby black plane crash and burn with unbelieving horror. A red emergency fire truck raced to the crash scene and the crew began extinguishing the fire with chemical foam. They quickly had it under control.

Krister was killed in his second performance of the day. In the morning, he had given a brilliant performance in a Bucker Jungmann biplane.

In 1937, Krister joined Pan American Airways as an apprentice engineer in the Atlantic Division. He served on the Bermuda-United States route for about a year, then, after attending school in Seattle, was assigned as assistant engineering officer on the famed Yankee Clipper.

In the Church Committee Files, under the heading

Volume 1 - Hearings on Unauthorized Storage of Toxic Agents

Current Section: 11. List of persons who received toxins from Fort Detrick

was Dr. Wayne I Jensen [botulinum Toxin]

U.S. Dept. of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

P.O. Box 459

Bear River Research Station

Brigham City, Utah

See

http://www.maryferre...3&relPageId=230

DODD, THOMAS J. (SEN.)

Sources: WC Vol 24, p. 852; Oswald: Assassin or Fall Guy? Joesten, p. 79; The Last Investigation, Fonzi, p. 237; Spy Saga, Melanson, p. 59; JFK & Vietnam, Newman, pp. 92-93; Crime & Coverup, Scott, p. 8; Deep Politics, Scott, pp. 215-216, 370; Official & Confidential, Summers, p. 196; Espionage Establishment, Wise & Ross, pp. 56-57; Cuban Invasion, Meyer, p. 38

Mary's

Comments: The Dodd bill was attempting to control guns. Speculation that LHO was attempting to help Dodd get the bill passed.

Another Krister articles

DMN Private Pilot Future in Texas Said Bright; September 28, 1961; Page 4

The Vice-Chairman of the Texas Aeronautics Commission presented

an optimistic picture to Dallas flying enthusiasts this week about the

private pilot's future in Texas.

Shelby Kritser, general manager of the Amarillo Globe-News

Publishing Co and an active pilot said at a recent luncheon

Shelby Kritser Killed in Airplane Accident; August 14, 1966

Shelby Krister, 52, chairman of the Texas Aeronautics Commission

and former general manager of the Amarillo Globe News Publishing Co.,

plunged to his death in an airplane accident Saturday.

Krister was flying an FBF Bearcat in an airshow watched by several

thousand persons. He was doing a power-off stall maneuver at about 600

feet, and apparently did not regain enough power soon enough to pull

out of the dive. The Bearcat was the last propellor-driven plane to be

developed by the Navy during World War II. Krister, prominent member

of a Panhandle ranching family, was appointed to the Texas Aeronautics

Commission in 1959 by then Gov. Price Daniel. He was reappointed to a

second six-year term last November by Gov. John Connally.

He was President of Trade-Wind Aircraft Corp., owners and operators

of the Tradewind Airport here, [Dallas]

He was active in the aviation business since 1941 in Amarillo.

Prior to 1941 he was an assistant engineering officer for Pan American

Airways for four years.

He was General Manager of the Globe News from 1952 until this year

and remained as a consultant to the newspaper.

Krister had piloted aircraft for 30 years and held an air-transport rating,

highest given by the Federal Aviation Agency.

In 1952 he was named to fill the unexpired term of Gene Howe*

of Amarillo on the Texas Game and Fish Commission, and in 1956

was appointed to the Texas Tourism Commission.

His widow, a son, Sloan, and a daughter survive.

Services will be at 11:00 a.m. Monday in Amarillo.

DMN October 7, 1953

Shiver appoints three to Game and Fish

Austin, Texas Three new members were appointed to

the Texas Game and Fish Commission by Governor Shivers Tuesday.

They are Henry Coffield, rancher and former mayor of Marfa;

Henry LeBlanc, Standard Brass Manufacturing Co., and President

of the Port Arthur Hunting Club, and Herbert J. Frensley, formerly with the Texas Employment

Commission and now with Brown and Root Construction Company

They succeed Richard M. Kleberg, Jr., Kingsville, Shelby Kistler, Amarillo

and V.F. (Doc) Neuhaus, McAllen. Their terms extend to September 1, 1959

DMN June 29, 1952 Krister To Head Game Commission

Austin Texas, June 28

Shelby Krister of Amarillo was named Saturday to fill the unexpired term

of the late Gene Howe on the Texas Game and Fish Commission.

Krister, Howe's son-in-law was closely associated with him in

game conservation matters, an announcement from Gov. Allen Shiver's office

said. Krister is the manger of the Amarillo Daily News. Howe's term would have expired

on September 1, 1953

DMN May 23, 1928; Vote Merger of Oil Scouts;

others motored to the Sloan Krister Ranch for a stag barbeque

DMN August 31, 1948 Tough Cousin of D.D.T. Kills Insects

.....but Dr C.J. Krister, with E.I. Du Pont Nemours & Co., said it is the least toxin harmful to plants

Possible Inter-relationships

ARNOLD ----- SAGALYN

CE 1654; CD 219 Director, Office of Law Enforcement Coordination, United States Treasury Department

MADDOX, AL -----

Sources: -----

Mary's

Comments: Former "partner" of Buddy Walthers. Opened Special Services International (detective agency) with R. E. "Bob" Hickman.

CLARY, H. P.

Sources: 1/14/64 Memo from Alcohol and Tobacco Tax, to Forrest Sorrels.

Mary's

Comments: Chief, Enforcement Branch, A&TT, 1114 Commerce Street, Dallas, TX 214 749-2854. Participated in search of TSBD 11/22/63.

although Paul Wilkins doesnt appear in Larry Sneed's No More Silence, he is mentioned in the account given by Donald Flutsche See pages 457-458

Donald Flusche..."When I got up to the sixth floor, there were several other people, mostly in plain-clothes. I can't recall the names

of those I saw, but I found out later that most of them were federal officers, either from ATF, or Federal Game Enforcement.

I thought this was rather unusual because why were they so involved in all of this, especially since murder, even a president, at that time was a

state crime, thus it was our crime and our investigation that would have to be conducted. There was some confusion on the part of

the people there as to what their roles should be in this thing.

END

Robert: It is interesting to me that Roy Westphal, who was also with Flutsche and Wilkins on the sixth floor at that time, does not make any reference to

the Game and Fish Commission, when interviewed for No More Silence, whereas both the former did mention it. Oh well, age does impair cognitive skills

BTW Westphal was head of the Criminal Intelligence Division, which did intertwine with several different law enforcement agencies

http://www.tshaonlin...s/TT/mdttk.html

TEXAS GAME AND FISH COMMISSION. The idea of managing the state's wildlife resources developed over several decades in the latter half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries. As the state's human population began to increase, especially after the arrival of the first railroads in the 1850s, the wildlife population began to decline. The state's first effort to regulate hunting occurred 1861, when the legislature established a two-year closed season on quail. Fishing regulations, in the form of restrictions on coastal seining and netting, were instituted in 1874. In 1879 the legislature established the office of Fish Commissioner to enforce such regulations; the office was abolished five years later because of intense controversy surrounding the introduction of German carp to Texas waterways . In 1883 130 counties in Texas claimed exemption from all game laws. By 1895, however, it had become clear that some regulatory office was needed to control the depletion caused by overfishing; in response to this need the legislature established the office of Fish and Oyster Commissioner. In 1907 the legislature also gave the commissioner the responsibility for hunting regulations, and the name of the office was changed to Game, Fish, and Oyster Commissioner. The first hunting licenses were sold in 1909. In 1919 the state had only six game wardens to enforce regulations, and many counties continued to claim exemptions; the number of wardens was increased to forty-five by 1923 and to eighty by 1928. In the 1920s the commissioner's office began developing extensive fish hatcheries in order to supplement the dwindling natural supply of fish; restocking of deer and releases of nilgai antelope began in the late 1920s and early 1930s. In 1929 the duties of the commissioner were transferred to a board-called the Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission-which was composed of six members, appointed by the governor for overlapping six-year terms. The commission appointed an executive secretary, who acted as chief executive officer. With the commission format, the agency had more stable leadership than the earlier single-commissioner style did, and as a result it became more consistent in its policy-making and enforcement. The major duties of the commission were to enforce the laws of the state pertaining to birds, game, fur-bearing animals, fish, and marine life; to issue hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses; to proclaim open seasons and bag limits on various types of game and fish; to operate fish hatcheries; to administer game preserves; to supervise the oyster beds of the state; to control the sand, shell, and gravel in the state's public waters; and to inform the public about the state's wildlife resources. In 1942 the commission began publishing Texas Game and Fish magazine, and in 1946 it began a statewide conservation education program. In 1951 the legislature expanded the commission to nine members and removed the term "oyster" from the commission's name. In 1958 the commission controlled hunting and fishing regulations in eighty counties; by 1962 hunting and fishing activities in 129 counties were under full or partial control of the commission's regulatory authority. The Texas Game and Fish Commission merged with the State Parks Board in 1963 to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Ed H. Ferguson, Jr., Ellen Schmidt, and Shirley Ratisseau Sweeney, "Let's Get Acquainted," Texas Game and Fish, October 1954-June 1955. Texas Parks and Wildlife Conservation Chronicle (Austin: Texas Parks and Wildlife, 1990).

KENNETH ----- HOWE

FBI agent. Saw LHO's note to Hosty.

WILLIAM WAYNE HOWE

Sources: CD 1528b Mary's Comments: He and his wife offered a home to Marina Oswald and her children. He was employed by Pitney-Bowes, 1410 L St., NW, Wash., DC

CHEEVER, BRUCE BISSELL

Sources: Dirty Work 2, Ray, p. 330; State Dept. Biographic Register, 1969; CU-313

Mary's

Comments: William King Harvey's Deputy (CU-313). DOB: 2/2/16; POB: Illinois. Received BA from Univ. of Washington in 1938. U.S. Marine Corps 1938-1946 - Overseas, Lieutenant Colonel. 1946-1948, Associate at Univ. of Washington. Received MA from Univ. of Washington in 1948. 1948-1950, Instructor at Western Washington College of Education. 1950-1953, Special Assistant, Dept. of the Navy. July 1953, Dept. of State, Stockholm, Sweden, Attache & political officer (CIA Chief of Station). 1956-1967, Unspecified government experience (Wm. King Harvey's Deputy in 1961 - CU 313). Jan. 1968, Dept of State, Pretoria, South Africa, First Secretary and Political Officer. As of Sept. 1968, Chief of Station. As of Feb. 1972, No entry in Dept. of State Records. Wife: Helen Howe.

And if you think any of this is interesting, you will be amazed at what you are about to read in the context of the above.

Juan Trippe, the Yale graduate who created the Pan American empire.

Juan Trippe was born into a wealthy banking family, descended from English seafarers who settled on the Maryland coast in the 1600s. He was educated in the finest schools (though he was, at best, an average student) and was graduated from Yale in 1919 after an active collegiate and extra-collegiate career that included playing on the football team, a brief stint as a navy flier in the war, reporting for the Yale newspaper on the NC flights of 1919, and starting a flying club.

As a businessman, Trippe regarded competition as an annoyance—he either joined forces with his competitors to create an even more powerful corporation or brushed them aside. Trippe was very comfortable in the world of high finance and the government movers and shakers, yet he did not hesitate to use the Spanish flavour of his name (even though he hated the name)—given to him by his mother who had expected to give birth to a girl whom she had wanted to name after a favorite Aunt Juanita— to open doors for him in Latin America.

The Sikorsky 5-42, the 32-passenger flying boat that pioneered Pan Am's routes to South America and the South Pacific in the 1930s.

Trippe saw himself and his company as instruments of American foreign policy in Latin America and in the Pacific. He engaged Lindbergh as a technical advisor and rubbed elbows with virtually every power broker and politico of influence to further not only the interests of Pan Am, but also of the entire American presence in the air. Some admired him and considered him a patriot; at least as many despised him and viewed him a megalomaniacal cut-throat and robber-baron. But the entire aviation community had to acknowledge that Trippe created the largest and best-run distance airline in the world during the four decades of his stewardship.

His first effort in airline-building was a small ferry line that ran from Long Island, New York, to various mountain resorts; this airline used war surplus navy planes. He spent a great deal of time studying the history of the railroads and applied many of the techniques of the great railroad builders—fair and otherwise—to the air transport industry. In 1922 he formed Colonial Air Transport, which was awarded a CAM contract for carrying mail between New York and Boston.

In 1927 Trippe won a contract for an air mail run from Florida to Havana, even though he had no planes to fly and two other airlines already operating in the Southeast were run by respected airmen like Eddie Rickenbacker and H.H. "Hap" Arnold. Trippe accomplished this magic by convincing the Cuban dictator Garado Machad to allow only his airline to land in Havana. Industry observers thought it particularly cheeky of Trippe to adopt the name of Arnold's operation, Pan American, when he forced that flier's company out of 71 business and took over the company's airplanes. Over the next decade, Trippe expanded farther out into Latin America and into the Pacific.

At each step, he cultivated a friendship with aircraft builders and encouraged them to build better, more powerful, and more luxurious aircraft. He would make large purchases, for which the manufacturers were grateful. Yet Trippe dealt with a variety of manufacturers and kept all of them guessing (along with his Board in which direction he was going to go. He viewed with alarm the inroads LuftHansa and its parent company, Condor Syndicate, were making in Latin America, and overtly made his efforts to establish commercial air dominance in the region a geopolitical matter. Many flights and activities of Pan Am during the prewar period were nothing short of espionage or diplomatic missions carried out for the State Department.

Pan Am encouraged Boeing to build large wide-body planes for land use: the Stratocruiser, inaugurated in 1949, made the New York—to -Paris flight in under ten hours, establishing once and for all the viability of the wide-body air transport.

Trippe first used Fokker Trimotor F-7s, equipped with the best Wright engines, for the Key West—Havana run in 1927. In 1928 these planes were joined by Sikorsky S-38 amphibian planes with Wasp engines. When Pan Am opened routes to Mexico and Central America in 1929, it used a fleet of Fort 5-AT-B Trimotors, the most expensive and advanced commercial plane of its day, and when Pan Am acquired Ralph O'Neil's New York—Rio de Janeiro—Buenos Aires Air Line (NYRBA, and known popularly as "Near Beer"), the new owner commandeered its fleet of fourteen Consolidated Commodore flying boats and flew them on the first Pan Am routes to South America beginning in 1930. Trippe's "secret weapon" in all the development of air routes was his chief pilot, Edwin C. "Eddie" Musick, a veteran Navy flier who built a training, communication, and weather forecasting and reporting system that was unmatched in aviation for decades.

Musick flew ahead to stake out the best landing facilities, establish communication relays and weather stations, and plan the best routes and schedules. His contribution was acknowledged by Trippe to be the key to Pan Am's success in South America and the Pacific. (Musick died in 1938 while on a scouting mission for Pan Am near Pago Pago in the Pacific; he was flying the Samoan Clipper, a Sikorsky S-42B aircraft.)

It was clear by then that a leap in airplane design was going to be required if commercial aviation was to be extended further. Trippe worked closely with Sikorsky in creating the S-40, the first of the "Clipper" flying boats (so named by Trippe himself). The first of the S-40s, the Caribbean Clipper, began service in 1931 (it was christened by Mrs. Herbert Hoover in a ceremony on the Potomac River) and was followed by the American Clipper.

The Pan Am seaplanes (here, the Boeing Atlantic Clipper) were virtually flying luxury hotels, with spacious accommodations for fifty to seventy-five passengers

These aircraft carried forty passengers and were equipped with four Pratt & Whitney Hornet engines that churned out 575 horsepower each and kept the seven- teen-ton (15.5t) mammoth flying at a cruising speed of 117 miles per hour (l88kph)—not very fast for so much horsepower, but the planes were built for luxury and safety, not speed. The plane looked like something assembled from different aircraft—the wing, the empennage (tail assembly), the engines, and the fuselage were held together by struts and wires—but it flew reliably and efficiently.

In 1934 Sikorsky stunned the aviation world by building an even better and more luxurious clipper: the S- 42. This time, the nacelles (the engine and propeller housings) were built into the wing so that the wing could be mounted just over the fuselage. The craft still relied on pontoons extending down from each wing for balance in the water, but the entire aircraft was sleeker, which accounted for its cruising speed's going up to 140 miles per hour (225kph). Meanwhile Trippe had joined forces with the W.R. Grace Company, which had formerly been a bitter rival, to form a subsidiary airline, Panagra, that would service the west coasts of North and South America.

Eyeing the Japanese expansion into the Pacific as yet another threat to the United States, he expanded Pan Am into the Pacific in 1935. For this, he needed yet another new Clipper: the M- 130, built by Glenn Martin (who took Sikorsky's S-42 as his starting point). This aircraft was even larger than the S-42 and was more luxuriously appointed. Its main advantage, however, was that it more than doubled the nonstop range of the S-42—three thousand miles (4,827km) com- pared with twelve hundred miles (1,931km). It was an M-130, the China Clipper, that became the most famous of the Pan Am flying boats in the 1930s. Pan Am ordered several smaller Clipper aircraft— some from Sikorsky, who manufactured the twin-engine "baby clippers," and others from Donald Douglas, who built the Dolphin, an eight-passenger flying boat that saw a great deal of service in the routes from the United States to China.

The grandest Clipper was still to come in 1939, in the form of the Boeing B-3 14, the largest and most powerful of the Clipper aircraft, and the one that proved most profitable, with a passenger capacity of more than seventy (plus a crew of up to sixteen). The B-3 14, of which only a dozen were built, represented the pinnacle of flying luxury. It contained sleeping quarters, fine dining rooms and bar lounges, deluxe suites and powder rooms, and a walkway inside the wings that allowed engineers to make in-flight repairs.

Another famous Pan Am aircraft, the Yankee Clipper, was a B-3 14. The Europeans were hard pressed to keep up with Pan Am's aircraft builders. England's Short Company built the Empire, a clipperlike aircraft and a flying-boat—mail- carrying-seaplane combination that was intended to carry both mail and passengers across the Atlantic; it saw limited service in Europe and in the Atlantic before the late 193Os, when Pan Am finally turned its attention there.

The Germans built ever larger flying boats, beginning with the Dornier Wals flying boats of the early 1920's and culminating in the gigantic Dornier Do X, an aircraft that dwarfed anything else then in the air. This plane had twelve engines mounted in six pairs atop a 157-foot (48m) wing. It carried 169 passengers in unparalleled luxury. The maiden voyage of the Do X in the spring of 1931 took so long and was plagued by so many problems that support for the plane among investors dried up amid jokes the media made of the plane. Claude Dornier, builder-designer of the Do X, was forced to donate the plane to a museum.

The Dornier Do X over Lake Constance in 1930. Like the airships that flew from the same lake, the Do X teas designed and operated more like an ocean liner than an airplane—the plush furniture, for example, was not attached to the floor. After a promotional tour of Europe and South America, the aircraft never flew commercially and was retired to a museum in Berlin where it was destroyed by bombing during the War.

The Do X was not the biggest of the 1930s aircraft to fly: that distinction goes to a Russian land-based aircraft, the Tupolev ANT-20, only one of which was built, the Maxim Gorky. Dubbed by Western journalists the "propaganda plane" (and called by some the Maximum Gawky), the ANT-20 was an immense needle of an airplane with a wingspan of 210 feet and powered by eight engines: six designed into the wing and a pair mounted above the fuselage. In flight, the Maxim Gorky was magnificent; it was also used effectively by the Soviets in many military parades. The Maxim Gorky crashed in May 1935 during a ceremonial flight, when an escort airplane crashed into its wing. The plane came apart in the air and none of the forty people aboard survived. The incident finally caused the aviation community to question the wisdom of building larger and larger aircraft.

The Russians produced the giant ANT-20, the Maxim Gorky (with money raised by the Soviet writers union), an eight-engine aircraft that seemed to have had only propaganda value. It was destroyed when an escort plane (piloted by a flier showing oft) crashed into it.

http://www.century-o...er%20ships3.htm

So I guess you could say everything is connected, at least in the world of intelligence operations.

This stands out particularly:

...October 7, 1953

Shiver appoints three to Game and Fish

Austin, Texas Three new members were appointed to

the Texas Game and Fish Commission by Governor Shivers Tuesday.

They are Henry Coffield, rancher and former mayor of Marfa;

Henry LeBlanc, Standard Brass Manufacturing Co., and President

of the Port Arthur Hunting Club, and Herbert J. Frensley, formerly with the Texas Employment

Commission and now with Brown and Root Construction Company

They succeed Richard M. Kleberg, Jr., Kingsville, Shelby Kistler, Amarillo

and V.F. (Doc) Neuhaus, McAllen. Their terms extend to September 1, 1959...

Herbert J. Frensley, formerly with the Texas Employment Commisison and now with Brown and Root Construciton seems to want closer scruinty.

Thanks for that one Robert,

Another feather for your cap,

BKelly

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thank you all, a fascinating read..take care all...b

NO TITLE SUBJECTS CIP, GAMBLING

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=141308&relPageId=4

This is more of an information sharing post that a look at a document related to the TG&F Commission.....

The CIP stands for Criminal Intelligence Program which is probably associated with Westphal,

the document is dated 11/12/63, and most of these documents, I am not very familiar with them

have to do with gambling and corruption, I would doubt there are any of these document which mention Lee Harvey

Oswald, but I wouldn't bet the bank on it either.

At any rate the above document is important, because it mentions Russell Douglas Matthews aka ITAR being in Dallas

on 11/3/63. There was also a gambling raid which resulted in the arrest of around a dozen persons

at the club Montemarte, there were four women arrested for prostitution, one of them was Ramona Wagner aka Tuesday

who, in January 1963 was working for Jack Ruby at the Carousel Club.

Lt Jack Revill, is mentioned in this document.

My belief about the TG&F Commission, in relation to the 6th floor is that, [unless said document are

still classified, references to anything to do with the 6th floor are going to be in what is known as a third agency file.

Cheers

PS I have no idea why Matthews is referred to as ITAR.

But I would like to know what he was doing on Nov. 22, 1963

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I have not gotten to the bottom of all this, but I am posting the following to get an idea of just who was in the TSBD, there was also Wes Wise, if I am not mistaken

1. Papers of Capt. Will Fritz

Texas School Book Depository Building November 22, 1963 12:40 PM

Homicide and Robbery Bureau officers assisting in search were

Captain J. W. Fritz

R. M. Sims

E. L. Boyd

Marvin Johnson

F.M. Turner

B.L. Senkel

L. D. Montgomery

V. D. Monaghen

Chief G. L. Lumpkin and other officers completed search of other floors

http://www.maryferre....do?docId=29122

By the way, I noticed that Judge Joe Brown who executed all these different search warrants for the Paine, 1026 North Beckley

Ruby's residence and also his car, is mentioned more than once as aiding in the searches. How in the heck, was he even able to

be the judge in the Ruby trial? Is not that cause for being automatically ineligible to be the presiding judge?

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I have not gotten to the bottom of all this, but I am posting the following to get an idea of just who was in the TSBD, there was also Wes Wise, if I am not mistaken

1. Papers of Capt. Will Fritz

Texas School Book Depository Building November 22, 1963 12:40 PM

Homicide and Robbery Bureau officers assisting in search were

Captain J. W. Fritz

R. M. Sims

E. L. Boyd

Marvin Johnson

F.M. Turner

B.L. Senkel

L. D. Montgomery

V. D. Monaghen

Chief G. L. Lumpkin and other officers completed search of other floors

http://www.maryferre....do?docId=29122

By the way, I noticed that Judge Joe Brown who executed all these different search warrants for the Paine, 1026 North Beckley

Ruby's residence and also his car, is mentioned more than once as aiding in the searches. How in the heck, was he even able to

be the judge in the Ruby trial? Is not that cause for being automatically ineligible to be the presiding judge?

At any rate, the Texas Game and Fish Commission becomes more interesting every time I look at it, the problem is I am

finding all the outside links but slim pickens on the inside.

That will be remedied soon, unless this is all a mirage, which I don't believe it is.

In 1963, whether it was all through the year, or partially I am not quite sure,

but there were several agencies that figure in resolving this conundrum.

Joint Board of Park Commissioners

Thirteen Members

Leonard M Green Dallas

D. O. Belew Fort Worth

Julius Schepps Dallas

James W. Aston Dallas

Rufus S .Garrett Jr., Fort Worth

Perry Bass Fort Worth

Reub R. Berry Fort Worth

O. B English Dallas

Charles C. Pierce Dallas

W.R. Hawn Dallas

Ernest J. Wilemon Arlington

Robert W Leonard Fort Worth

Chairman James R Leeton Fort Worth

State Parks and Wildlife Commission

Three Members

James Dellinger, of Corpus Christi

A W Moursund of Johnson City [Robert: and also an attorney/friend of Lyndon B Johnson prominently featured in J Waddy Bullion’s In The Boat With LBJ]

Chairman William Odom of Austin

Director Weldon Watson Austin [nonmember]

Aeronautics Commission

Six Members

Paul M Fulks of Wolfe City

James N Ludlum of Austin

Shelby M Krister of Amarillo

E. M. Anderson, Jr. of

Dr Lloyd M Southwick of Edinburgh

A.G. Thompson of Hamilton

Director Cliff Green Walton Bdlg. Austin [nonmember]

Game and Fish Commission [combined with State Parks Board in 1963.]

to Form The Parks and Wildlife Commission

Source 1964 Texas Almanac covering the year 1963

pages 519 and 525

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I have not gotten to the bottom of all this, but I am posting the following to get an idea of just who was in the TSBD, there was also Wes Wise, if I am not mistaken

1. Papers of Capt. Will Fritz

Texas School Book Depository Building November 22, 1963 12:40 PM

Homicide and Robbery Bureau officers assisting in search were

Captain J. W. Fritz

R. M. Sims

E. L. Boyd

Marvin Johnson

F.M. Turner

B.L. Senkel

L. D. Montgomery

V. D. Monaghen

Chief G. L. Lumpkin and other officers completed search of other floors

http://www.maryferre....do?docId=29122

By the way, I noticed that Judge Joe Brown who executed all these different search warrants for the Paine, 1026 North Beckley

Ruby's residence and also his car, is mentioned more than once as aiding in the searches. How in the heck, was he even able to

be the judge in the Ruby trial? Is not that cause for being automatically ineligible to be the presiding judge?

At any rate, the Texas Game and Fish Commission becomes more interesting every time I look at it, the problem is I am

finding all the outside links but slim pickens on the inside.

That will be remedied soon, unless this is all a mirage, which I don't believe it is.

In 1963, whether it was all through the year, or partially I am not quite sure,

but there were several agencies that figure in resolving this conundrum.

Joint Board of Park Commissioners

Thirteen Members

Leonard M Green Dallas

D. O. Belew Fort Worth

Julius Schepps Dallas

James W. Aston Dallas

Rufus S .Garrett Jr., Fort Worth

Perry Bass Fort Worth

Reub R. Berry Fort Worth

O. B English Dallas

Charles C. Pierce Dallas

W.R. Hawn Dallas

Ernest J. Wilemon Arlington

Robert W Leonard Fort Worth

Chairman James R Leeton Fort Worth

State Parks and Wildlife Commission

Three Members

James Dellinger, of Corpus Christi

A W Moursund of Johnson City [Robert: and also an attorney/friend of Lyndon B Johnson prominently featured in J Waddy Bullion's In The Boat With LBJ]

Chairman William Odom of Austin

Director Weldon Watson Austin [nonmember]

Aeronautics Commission

Six Members

Paul M Fulks of Wolfe City

James N Ludlum of Austin

Shelby M Krister of Amarillo

E. M. Anderson, Jr. of

Dr Lloyd M Southwick of Edinburgh

A.G. Thompson of Hamilton

Director Cliff Green Walton Bdlg. Austin [nonmember]

Game and Fish Commission [combined with State Parks Board in 1963.]

to Form The Parks and Wildlife Commission

Source 1964 Texas Almanac covering the year 1963

pages 519 and 525

Robert,

Thanks for following up on this lead, as I too think its important.

The idea that there were two guys on the Sixth Floor in the aftermath of the assassination from a government agency that we had never heard of until now is quite surprising.

There might be an innocent explanation, as they could have been in court that day or with the Sheriff or some legal business, and just followed the motorcade and the other officers.

But in any case, if they were there, they should have filed a report explaining what they were doing, what they did, and what they witnessed.

BK

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I have followed this angle about as far as I can go, I will add that Gary Mack has an interview with Mcgredy, except on the 6th Floor Museum website, it is spelled

Mcgready.........

Here's the last item I found.

The Coffeyville Journal

Coffeyville, KS 67337

September 5, 2000

M. HOWARD MEGREDY

http://archiver.root...0-10/0972395988

M. Howard Megredy, 85, of Dallas, died Sunday (Sept. 3) at Dallas Presbyterian

Hospital.

Mr. Megredy was born Dec. 13, 1914, at Coffeyville to Frank and Mary Ellen

Megredy. He attended Coffeyville schools and graduated from Coffeyville

Junior College in 1937. He started his flying career in 1930 and received

his private pilot license in 1937. He graduated from Dallas Aviation School

and Air College with a commercial pilots license. He continued his training

at Ft. Worth Meacham Field and received his flight instructor rating. He

was employed as the General Manager for Funk Aircraft Manufacturing Company

at Coffeyville and test flew aircraft manufactured there.

Mr. Megredy married Jonell Ditty on Nov. 29, 1942. The couple was married

for 57 years. He was the Assistant Chief for War Training Service in 1942.

He was transferred to Dallas Transport Command as a Ferry Pilot with training

at Randolph Field. He completed his war service as a flight instructor

for the Air Force at Pittsburg. He was Chief Pilot for Research Inc. of

Dallas from 1950-1980. He served as Director of Aviation for Dallas from

1955-1980.

Mr. Megredy retired in 1980 and became a realtor. He belonged to QB, Early

Birds, and OX5. He was the Director for the Frontiers of Flight Museum

of Dallas Love Field.

Survivors include his wife, Jonell Megredy; one daughter, Marianne Beckham;

one son, Douglas; two granddaughters; one grandson.

Graveside Services will be held 11 a.m. Wedneday at the Fariview Cemetery,

Cherryvale. Friends should gather at the cemetery prior to service time.

The family will receive friends at the Ford-Wulf-Bruns Edgewood Chapel,

Tuesday for 7 p.m. until 9 p.m.

The family would welcome memorials to Coffeyville Aviation Heritage Inc.

of Coffeyville.

Memorial gifts may be left at the funeral home.

Here is the 6th floor bio summary

http://www.jfk.org/g...y-name?letter=M

Howard McGready

At the time of the assassination, McGready was a city official in charge of operations at Dallas Love Field airport. Recorded January 7, 1994.

So maybe Mr Mack would tell you more, Bill.

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