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A new Holt-Files-Baker revelation?


Jack White
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Command area on the second floor of the Texas School Book Depository (TSBD): Cliff Carter, Carlos Marcello, Jack Rubenstein, George Reese;

Carlos was in court in N. O., no?

You are correct, David. Carlos Marcello was in court that day and David Ferrie was with him.

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Has the Defense Industrial Security Command (DISC) ever been found to exist anywhere outside of the Torbitt Document (and works like MacKenzie's who reference it)?

MacKenzie even throws in Saul from Appointment in Dallas. What I remember about Saul is that he claimed he heard the sirens of the approaching motorcade. The only reference I have ever seen to sirens as the motorcade approached Dealey Plaza.

JFK (so the Secret Service claimed) didn't like SS agents on his limo. How about sirens blowing around him?

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Has the Defense Industrial Security Command (DISC) ever been found to exist anywhere outside of the Torbitt Document (and works like MacKenzie's who reference it)?

MacKenzie even throws in Saul from Appointment in Dallas. What I remember about Saul is that he claimed he heard the sirens of the approaching motorcade. The only reference I have ever seen to sirens as the motorcade approached Dealey Plaza.

JFK (so the Secret Service claimed) didn't like SS agents on his limo. How about sirens blowing around him?

This guy is a Quacker, and has all BS and no real info that you can hang your hat on. He almost had me going with the Rosselli call from the Baylor Med Cafateria, but his whole speil is just a blend of a little of every other BS book that's out there.

But yes, there really is a Defense Industrial Security Command - and they were based and still might be based in Columbus, the capitol of Ohio and also the home of Larry Flint and others of interest, like Gordon Novel.

It comes into play in regards to Dealey Plaza in regards to Bell Hell, Gen. Dynamics, Lockhead, KODAK, Jaggers/Chiles/Stoval, Collins Radio and a few other defense contractors that employed subjects and suspects, including Michael Paine, Malcolm Wallace, Max Clark, Carl Mather and Paperclip Nazis Von Braun and Dornberger.

Also note that Oswald twice tried to get a job with Collins Radio, and Hosty's investigation of Oswald was primarily concerned with identifying his place of employment to ensure that it was not a defense contractor or sensitive security company, and when he learned Oswald was at the TSBD, he deemed that not a security sensitive company and backed off his investigation.

BK

http://www.dss.mil/psco/disco.html

DISCO furnishes National Industrial Security Program forms pertaining to personnel security clearances to authorized requestors, i.e., DSS Regional offices, User Agencies, and contractors that have a facility security clearance. To request a specific form, email occ.rqst.forms@dss.mil. For the request to be fulfilled, required information includes complete company name and mailing address; CAGE code; the specific form being requested; and form quantity.

DISC: http://www.archives..../dss.html#disco

The National Industrial Security Program at DSS

The National Industrial Security Program (NISP) is the largest of the three industrial programs present at DSS. Under the NISP, the Director of the Defense Security Service (DSS) administers the NISP on behalf of the Secretary of Defense and user agencies and is responsible for the administration of the Industrial Security Program for DoD and 23 non-DoD User Departments and Agencies of the Executive Branch, which are signatories to an agreement with DoD.

Currently, DSS has Industrial Security oversight and assistance responsibility for over 12,000 cleared facilities participating in the NISP and estimates that there are around 11 million classified documents in the hands of U.S. industry.

The Defense Security Service (DSS) has implemented a modernization initiative to enhances the effectiveness of the entire security community through standardized data sharing with customers and end users. Some current initiatives include:

  • Facility Verification Request (FVR)
  • The Defense Clearance and Investigations Index (DCII)
  • Joint Personnel Adjudicating Systerm (JPAS)
  • Electronic Questionnaire for Investigations Processing (e-QIP)

The U.S. Government relies upon cleared facilities to administer sound security programs on its behalf. A facility clearance (FCL) is a government decision that a facility is eligible for access to classified information. The granting of an FCL to a contractor marks the start of a partnership between the Government and the contractor.

More information on the Facility Security Clearance (FCL) may be found at http://www.dss.mil/i.../fac_clear.html

DSS provides assurance to its Government customers that:

  • A facility is eligible to receive classified information.
  • The contractor has security systems in place to protect the classified information with which they have been entrusted.
  • Contractors implement and maintain sound security programs in accordance with the National Industrial Security Operating Manual (NISPOM).

The contractor works with DSS to ensure that:

  • They have security systems in place to protect the classified information with which they have been entrusted in a manner equivalent to its protection within the executive branch of Governemnt.

Initial Facility Security Clearances Process

This includes:

  • the introduction of contractor management and key personnel to the requirements of the NISP;
  • the adjudication of any elements of Foreign Ownership, Control, or Influence (FOCI); and
  • the initial facility accreditation.

Maintenance of the Facility Security Clearance

This includes all services required to maintain a facility clearance, to include:

  • security reviews
  • advice and assistance
  • administrative inquires
  • AIS accreditations
  • processing contractor clearance actions
  • government agency assistance
  • security briefings.

Facility Clearance Life Cycle

  • The facility life cycle begins when the contractor is awarded a contract that involves handling classified information.
  • An initial survey of the contractor starts the FCL process. The end result of the survey is that the facility and the Key Management Personnel are cleared, or that they have been denied a clearance during the process of adjudication.
  • If the contractor has been cleared, then the DSS Industrial Security Representative then begins the cycle of:
  • Educating contractor employees who will be safeguarding classified information;
  • Approving the security containers for storing classified information;
  • Accrediting automated information systems that process classified information;
  • Providing advice and assistance to the security office and contractor employees, as requested;
  • Assisting the contractor in investigating security violations, to include determining if compromise occurred and putting procedures in place to prevent recurrences;
  • Ensuring transfer of classified information between nations (government to government) is done in compliance with appropriate agreements; and
  • Reviewing the contractor's overall security program, on an annual basis, to ensure all information is being safeguarded properly.

The Defense Industrial Security Clearance Office (DISCO)

The DISCO, located in Columbus, Ohio, processes, issues and maintains industrial security program facility clearances and industrial security personnel security clearances.

The Security, Education, Training and Awareness Program

Security education, training, professional development support, and counterintelligence awareness is the third major mission area of DSS.

<A name=academy>The Defense Security Service Academy

The Defense Security Service Academy plays an integral part of this mission area for DSS. The DSS Academy (DSSA), located in Linthicum, MD, trains almost 10,000 students within the DoD and Defense Industry each year. DSSA offers formal classroom training, computer-based training, correspondence/distance learning and tele-training. More information on DSSA may be found at http://dssa.dss.mil/seta/seta.html

Organization Chart:

http://www.dss.mil/p..._org_chart.html

FAQ:

http://www.dss.mil/psco/ps_faqs.html

1. WHAT IS AN INDUSTRIAL PERSONNEL SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: An industrial personnel security clearance, referred to as a “PCL”, is an administrative determination that an industrial employee is eligible for access to classified information. This determination is based on investigation and review of available personal data and a finding that access is clearly consistent with national interests.

2. WHO ISSUES THE PERSONNEL SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: The Department of Defense issues the personnel security clearances for U.S. citizen employees of a contractor who require access to classified information. Clearances may be at the TOP SECRET, SECRET, or CONFIDENTIAL level. Requests for clearances are sent to the Defense Industrial Security Clearance Office (DISCO) which issues clearances for industry personnel on behalf of the DoD and User Agencies. Personnel Security Clearances must be kept to an absolute minimum based on contractual needs.

3. WHO MAY HAVE ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED INFORMATION?

A: Only those persons who have a bona fide need-to-know and who possess a personnel security clearance at the same or higher level as the classified information to be disclosed may have access to classified information. Back to Top

4. WHEN MAY AN INDIVIDUAL BE PROCESSED FOR A PERSONNEL SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: An individual may be processed for a personnel security clearance when employed by a cleared contractor in a job requiring access to classified information. As an exception, a candidate for employment may be processed for a personnel security clearance provided a written commitment for employment has been made by the contractor, and the candidate has accepted the offer in writing. The commitment for employment will indicate that employment shall commence within 30 days of the granting of eligibility for a PCL.

5. ARE NON-U.S. CITIZENS ELIGIBLE FOR A PERSONNEL SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: No. However, under rare circumstances, a non-U.S. citizen may be issued a Limited Access Authorization for access to classified information. Specific criteria and limitations are provided in the NISPOM. You may also contact your IS Rep for additional information.

6. MAY AN INDIVIDUAL WHO HAS BEEN GRANTED A SECURITY CLEARANCE BE AUTHORIZED ACCESS TO ANY AND ALL CLASSIFIED INFORMATION?

A: No. The individual must have both the appropriate level of personnel security clearance and a need-to-know for the classified information.

7. DO CONTRACTORS HAVE THE AUTHORITY TO GRANT, DENY, OR REVOKE PERSONNEL CLEARANCES FOR THEIR EMPLOYEES?

A: No. This authority is reserved by the Government.

8. HOW LONG DOES A PERSONNEL SECURITY CLEARANCE REMAIN IN EFFECT?

A: Generally speaking, a personnel security clearance remains in effect as long as the individual remains continuously employed by the cleared contractor and can reasonably be expected to require access to classified information. To preclude excessive clearances, the Facility Security Officer should continually review the number of employees with the personnel security clearances and reduce the number of clearances whenever possible.

9. WHO MAY APPLY FOR A SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: Individuals cannot apply for a personnel security clearance application on their own. Rather, the company determines whether an employee will require access to classified information in performance of tasks or services related to the fulfillment of a classified contract. Once the company makes this determination, the individual may be processed for a security clearance.

10. WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF A SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: The purpose of a security clearance is to determine whether a person is able and willing to safeguard classified national security information, based onhis or herloyalty, character, trustworthiness, and reliability.

11. WHO DECIDES WHAT LEVEL OF CLEARANCE A PERSON RECEIVES?

A: The company determines the positions that require a security clearance, as well as the level required, based upon the duties and responsibilities of each position. This determination is based on contractual needs and requirements.

12. WHAT KIND OF INVESTIGATION IS CONDUCTED TO MAKE THIS DETERMINATION?

A: The kind, or type, of investigation conducted depends on the access level that the individual is required to have to perform his or her official duties. For access to CONFIDENTIAL or SECRET information, a National Agency Check with Local Agency Checks and Credit Check (NACLC) is completed. For access to TOP SECRET or Sensitive Compartmented Information (SCI) information, a Single Scope Background Investigation (SSBI) is required.

13. HOW MANY TYPES OR LEVELS OF SECURITY CLEARANCE ARE THERE?

A: There are three levels of security clearance, with the highest level being TOP SECRET. SECRET is the next level of clearanceand CONFIDENTIAL is the lowest level. In addition, some classified information has extra protection measures applied such as SCI and Special Access Programs (SAP). Special approval must be given to have access to this information. "For Official Use Only" is not a security classification. It is used to protect information covered under the Privacy Act and other sensitive data.

14. WHAT WORK DOES EACH CLEARANCE ALLOW A PERSON TO DO?

A: A clearance allows a person filling a specific position to have access to classified national security information up to and including the level of clearance that they hold, so long as the person has a need to know for the information to perform his or her duties.

15. WILL MY CLEARANCE TRANSFER TO OTHER FEDERAL AGENCIES?

A: In most cases it will transfer. All federal agencies adjudicate using the 13 Adjudication Guidelines and reciprocal recognition of existing personnel security clearance adjudications throughout the national security community is strongly emphasized by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). OMB has issued guidance regarding reciprocity of access eligibility determinations to ensure that investigations are only conducted to grant new security clearances when they are actually required.

16. DOES HAVING A SECURITY CLEARANCE GUARANTEE EMPLOYMENT WITH AN ORGANIZATION?

A: No. The hiring process addresses whether someone will be initially selected for a particular position within an organization. The security clearance process does not begin until after an applicant is hired or the organization has made a written commitment for employment and the applicant has accepted the offer in writing. Further, personnel security clearances are only initiated when employees will have a need for access to classified information to perform his or her duties.

17. WHO CONDUCTS THE INVESTIGATION?

A: The Department of Defense has entered into an agreement with the Office of Personnel Management to conduct the majority of the personnel security investigations (PSIs) performed in connection with granting access to classified information. OPM uses government and contract investigators to conduct these investigations.

18. ARE MEMBERS OF MY FAMILY OR PEOPLE LIVING WITH ME SUBJECT TO A SECURITY CHECK?

A: There are circumstances in which limited records checks or an investigation may be conducted on a spouse or cohabitant. National agency checks are conducted on spouses and/or cohabitants of individuals being processed for a TOP SECRET clearance. Additional investigations may be conducted when the spouse or cohabitant is a foreign national.

*A cohabitant is defined as someone with whom you live together as husband and wife and the relationship involves the mutual assumption of marital rights, duties, and obligations, which are usually manifested by married people, including, but not necessarily dependent on, sexual relations.

19. WHY WOULD I BE DENIED A SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: The Adjudicative Guidelines for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Information are used by DoD Central Adjudication Facilities to determine both initial and continued eligibility for access to classified information. The adjudication process is an examination of a sufficient period of a person's life to make an affirmative determination that the person is an acceptable security risk. Eligibility for access to classified information is predicated upon the individual meeting these personnel security guidelines. The adjudication process is the careful weighing of a number of variables known as the whole-person concept. All available, reliable information about the person, past and present, favorable and unfavorable, is considered in reaching a clearance determination. When an individual’s life history shows evidence of unreliability or untrustworthiness, questions arise whether the individual can be relied on and trusted to exercise the responsibility necessary for working in a secure environment where protection of classified information is paramount.

20. WHAT OPTION DO THOSE WHO HAVE A SECURITY CLEARANCE REVOKED OR DENIED HAVE TO REGAIN OR ATTAIN A CLEARANCE?

A: An individual whose security clearance has been denied or revoked by a central adjudication facility has the opportunity to appeal the decision. The process for doing so differs between military and civilian personnel and contractors. Executive Order 12968, "Access to Classified Information," prescribes the process for military and civilian personnel. Executive Order 10865, "Safeguarding Classified Information Within Industry," outlines the process for contactors.

For contractor personnel, the denial, revocation and appeal process is the responsibility of the Defense Office of Hearings and Appeals (DOHA). The individual may request a hearing before a DOHA administrative judge in order to provide additional, relevant information and will have the opportunity to cross-examine witnesses. Upon completion of the hearing, the administrative judge will render a decision. If the decision is to deny or revoke the security clearance, the individual has the opportunity to appeal the decision to the Appeal Board. The Appeal Board will review the case file and render its decision. This decision is final and concludes the appeal process.

At the conclusion of the appeal process, an individual whose security clearance has been denied or revoked may not reapply for a security clearance for one year from the date of the final decision. The individual may reapply for a security clearance through his or her employing activity if there is a need for access to classified information. The individual is responsible for providing documentation that the circumstances or conditions which resulted in the denial or revocation have been rectified or sufficiently mitigated to warrant reconsideration. The central adjudication facility may accept or reject the reapplication.

21. HOW OFTEN IS A SECURITY CLEARANCE RENEWED?

A: An individual is normally subject to periodic reinvestigation at a minimum of every five years for a TOP SECRET level clearance, every 10 years for a SECRET level clearance and every 15 years for a CONFIDENTIAL level clearance.

22. WHAT CAN CAUSE A DELAY IN THE SECURITY CLEARANCE PROCESS?

A: The most common areas of delay include the submission of incomplete security application packages, poorly collected fingerprints and investigations that involve coverage of extensive overseas activities.

Individuals can help expedite the process by ensuring they have completed all forms in a thorough and accurate manner; familiarizing themselves with the appearance of a properly rolled set of fingerprints, to ensure they are recorded properly; and when possible, providing stateside references that can verify foreign activities.

23. HOW DO I PROCESS RELEASE(S), FINGERPRINT CARDS, AND SF-312 CLASSIFIED INFORMATION NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENTS?

A: Release(s) and certification forms may be scanned and attached to JPAS. This is the acceptable means for providing handwritten comments or markings to indicate the request is for periodic reinvestigation and no fingerprint cards are required. If the company can not scan attachments in, an option is to fax the release(s) and certification forms to DSS. When sending the forms via fax, do not send any other pages; no cover page or fingerprint cards should be sent. The fax number is 866-804-0686. No hand written comments or markings are acceptable on pages that are faxed.

Fingerprint Cards are submitted to the Office of Personnel Management after DISCO has processed the request for investigation and forwarded it to OPM. Visit the JPAS web site, e-QIP FAQs for the current OPM mailing address. OPM holds fingerprint cards for 30 days and checks three times for the investigation request. If no match is made at the end of the 30 day period, OPM returns the attachments to the requesting agency. For industry, all OPM returns are sent to DISCO. Facility Security Officers (FSO) should ensure that the Fingerprint Card is not sent to DISCO until the FSO confirms in JPAS and the SII that OPM has received the investigation request.

The SF-312 Classified Information Non-Disclosure Agreement should be mailed to DISCO after the FSO has completed the in-brief of their employee. The mailing address is:

Defense Industrial Security Clearance Office

2780 Airport Drive, Suite 400

Columbus, OH 43219-2268

24. WHAT CAN I DO TO SPEED THE PROCESS?

A: A lot of detailed information is required to conduct a background investigation. Information such as complete names, addresses, telephone numbers, and dates of birth for relatives will be required. The form the clearance applicant completes is on-line and permits information to be gathered even after the process fill out the form (once), complete and submit it. When periodic updates are required, the applicant will only need to update information that has changed since the initial submission. If the applicant would like to preview the type of information that will be required, access the Questionnaire for National Security Positions(Standard Form 86) and begin collecting information so it will be available when needed.

25. WHERE CAN I GET ASSISTANCE COMPLETING MY SECURITY CLEARANCE PACKAGE OR INQUIRE ABOUT THE STATUS OF MY SECURITY CLEARANCE?

A: The company Facility Security Officer (FSO) should be the first contact for assistance in completing a security clearance package or to inquire into the status of a security clearance. The DoD Security Services Center is also available.

Edited by William Kelly
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