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McBride vs Myers on the Murder of Tippit


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Jim,


Thanks for posting this. I've always thought Tippit was somehow involved (I disagree with him being up on the knoll), and he knew what was going on, but had no idea he himself would be gunned down on the street to further frame Oswald as the crazy communist. And the throw down wallet of Oswald's is the clincher for me (he'd have to be the dumbest murderer in history to have lost his wallet at the crime scene).


As for Dale Myers, we all know he's an award-winning fraud. Myers is critical of Tippit's father being "slightly scrambled" in his old age, yet he and the network who allowed him to made his disgraceful, fraudulent and downright comical cartoon based on the Z film (photo from Pat Speers's website):


murderbycoldcrone.jpg

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Thanks Mike. I thought Joe made a nice reply to the hack Myers.

I agree that with the throw down wallet, which Myers is in denial about, the whole Tippit scenario now deepens.

I think Joe makes a good case for TIppit and his partner pursuing Oswald instead of just the accidental meeting.

Yes, Pat Speer does a nice job demolishing the Myers' cartoon of the Z film. Others have also, like Mili Cranor and Bob Harris.

And don't leave out his sock puppetry about Reclaiming History.

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I thought that was a very interesting article, and I agree that the Tippit shooting is underexplored.

McBride names Dallas policeman Harry Olsen, Jack Ruby, and Ruby connected hoodlum Darrell Wayne (Dago) Garner as people of interest in the Tippit shooting. He also seems to confirm that William Duane Mentzel was the other officer sent in pursuit of Oswald at that time.

In my opinion, the WC version of the Tippit shooting is wildly suspicious on its own. When you add the police car stopping outside Oswald's place and honking twice before driving away, I believe it's even more so.

Why would a cop, believing he might have had the president's assassin in view, not call in for backup? That is one big red flag for me.

Would that cop, seeing the most important suspect he might ever see in his life, wave him over and interrogate him through a car window in a casual manner? That is suspicious.

Would the president's assassin walk toward a cop or away from a cop at that moment? I find it very unlikely that he would approach a policeman calmly, though I will concede that it's possible. Maybe Oswald (assuming he's a guilty lone nut) didn't know that his description was out at that point and wanted to remain plausibly unsuspicious. But, could the police car outside Oswald's rooming house explain why Oswald was amiable to approaching a police car at the time he was a fugitive from the law? Perhaps he had confederates who were cops or dressed as cops. Perhaps he was told a police car would be part of the getaway?

After the window conversation between Oswald and Tippit, Tippit declined a second opportunity to call in for backup. This, IMHO, is an even bigger red flag for me. Clearly, by his subsequent actions of getting out of his police car and drawing his gun, Tippit thought Oswald to be a dangerous individual in need of further interrogation or to be detained. I think that Tippit not calling in to HQ after the window conversation is a clear sign that his intention was not to apprehend Oswald alive.

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I thought that was a very interesting article, and I agree that the Tippit shooting is underexplored.

McBride names Dallas policeman Harry Olsen, Jack Ruby, and Ruby connected hoodlum Darrell Wayne (Dago) Garner as people of interest in the Tippit shooting. He also seems to confirm that William Duane Mentzel was the other officer sent in pursuit of Oswald at that time.

In my opinion, the WC version of the Tippit shooting is wildly suspicious on its own. When you add the police car stopping outside Oswald's place and honking twice before driving away, I believe it's even more so.

Why would a cop, believing he might have had the president's assassin in view, not call in for backup? That is one big red flag for me.

Would that cop, seeing the most important suspect he might ever see in his life, wave him over and interrogate him through a car window in a casual manner? That is suspicious.

Would the president's assassin walk toward a cop or away from a cop at that moment? I find it very unlikely that he would approach a policeman calmly, though I will concede that it's possible. Maybe Oswald (assuming he's a guilty lone nut) didn't know that his description was out at that point and wanted to remain plausibly unsuspicious. But, could the police car outside Oswald's rooming house explain why Oswald was amiable to approaching a police car at the time he was a fugitive from the law? Perhaps he had confederates who were cops or dressed as cops. Perhaps he was told a police car would be part of the getaway?

After the window conversation between Oswald and Tippit, Tippit declined a second opportunity to call in for backup. This, IMHO, is an even bigger red flag for me. Clearly, by his subsequent actions of getting out of his police car and drawing his gun, Tippit thought Oswald to be a dangerous individual in need of further interrogation or to be detained. I think that Tippit not calling in to HQ after the window conversation is a clear sign that his intention was not to apprehend Oswald alive.

Denny,

I've read somewhere that Oswald turned around and started walking in the other direction when he saw Tippit's car coming down the street. I don't know if it's true or not but I thought I'd throw that out there.

Of course even if he did so, it doesn't prove that he assassinated JFK.

Anyone else remember reading that, or am I imagining things?

-- Tommy

Edited by Thomas Graves
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