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Marina Oswald's Viewpoint


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There's long been a theory that she was threatened with being deported if she didn't agree with the official version, and some claim that Marina only changed her stance after LBJ died. I really can't say one way or the other, as I haven't done as much research into her as I'd like.

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There's long been a theory that she was threatened with being deported if she didn't agree with the official version, and some claim that Marina only changed her stance after LBJ died. I really can't say one way or the other, as I haven't done as much research into her as I'd like.

_________________________

Google Marina and Oprah, she did the show in I think 96, it's online. I have an old article of an interview she gave in about 85, I think she began speaking out publicly in the early 90's.

Many don't trust her as her story changed over the years, but I think in the beginning she must have been scared s******, being from Russia, not even speaking English, no real right to be here, and then, like all of us here on the forum, she began to get educated on the case, so of course her story changed as she learned more. But I really don't know anything as to who she really "was" before coming here. Neice of a KGB agent, so, it's pretty complicated, like the entire story of the LHO part of this case is very complex.

I'd love to hear more on this too.

Dawn

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Just to give an idea as to Marina's lack of complete grasp on the English language & American ways, here's an excerpt from her Orleans Parish Grand Jury Testimony, page 71. And doesn't it seem a bit like Garrison's leading her at times? Anyway, the reason this part is about Ruth Paine is that it was copied ( and the HTML switched into BB code ) from a personal online research journal into Ruth ( that only my close friends are able to read as it's nothing groundbreaking yet ).

Juror: How old is Ruth Paine?

Marina:Older than me, 5, 6, or 7 years.

Juror Do you still see Ruth Paine?

Marina: No, I like her and appreciate what she did. I was advised by Secret Service not to be connected with her, seems like she was .. not connected .. she was sympathizing with the CIA. She wrote letters over there and they told me for my own reputation, to stay away.

Juror: The Secret Service told you this?

Marina: Yes.

Mr. Alcock: What did they say?

Marina: They didn't say anything personal about her, but they said it's better for me to stay away from her for a while, it seemed like she was sympathizing with CIA.

Mr. Garrison: Couldn't they say she was connected with the Central Intelligence Agency, because that's our conclusion about Ruth Paine.

Marina: I don't know if she was connected with CIA, but they told me to stay away.

Mr. Sciambra: Did they say sympathize or associated with?

Marina: I don't remember right now exactly, but the way I understood...

Mr. Sciambra: Did they explain to you why it would be bad for you to associate with her if she was associated with the CIA?

Marina: I had the impression... the Civil Liberties Union, I don't know...

Juror: Marina, did the Secret Service say to you, Marina, it is better for you not to see Ruth Paine anymore because it's not good for you, she might be saying things to the CIA that might be detrimental to you, Marina?

Marina: No, because she... What is CIA?

Juror: Central Intelligence Agency.

Marina: Could she be member?

Mr. Garrison: She probably is employee.

Mr. Sciambra: In other words, they gave you the impression...

Marina: Seems like she had friends over there and it would be bad for me if people find out connection between me and Ruth and CIA.

Mr. Sciambra: In other words, you were left with the distinct impression that she was in some way connected with the CIA?

Marina: Yes.

Mr. Garrison: Were you surprised to learn that the FBI and the Secret Service were not clear as to just who was with the CIA? Did that not occur to you as rather odd?

Marina: I was not questioning them so much.

Mr. Garrison: In Russia generally, if somebody is with the Intelligence Agency, doesn't the rest of the government know about it?

Marina: I guess so..

Mr. Garrison: Did the FBI indicate any curiosity about Ruth Paine?

Marina: Yes.

Mr. Garrison: In the same way?

Marina: I don't know which way because I wasn't there, but they questioned her a lot.

Mr. Garrison: How about Michael Paine?

Marina: Him too.

Mr. Garrison: He worked for Bell Helicopter.

Marina: He used to work then I heard he lose his job. I hope not.

Mr. Garrison: No, he didn't lose it.

Edited by Nic Martin
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There's athread on this Forum where I and other members discussed Marina, June, Rachel and their possible views on the case.

I recall that we have an interview with June (Porter, Oswald) on this Forum and also the Oprah one with Marina somewhere, possibly in that thread. I'm sure a search on this Forum will prove to be fruitful.

So far we did conclude that pursuing Marina or June for an interview would be pretty much a dead-end. We have understood that Rachel might be interested in proving her biological father not-guilty.

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Wim Dankbaar Posted Yesterday, 06:57 PM

  I recently asked her if she is still interested in proving Lee's innocence.

She said she has given up because she tried all she could.

Wim

Out of all the witnesses, she is the key witness. If anyone could turn the case around, in the sense of giving new testimony towards proving Lee innocent, it's Marina. Like many fellow researchers, I bet she was not entirely honest when she testified.

Edited by Antti Hynonen
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Wim Dankbaar Posted Yesterday, 06:57 PM

  I recently asked her if she is still interested in proving Lee's innocence.

She said she has given up because she tried all she could.

Wim

Out of all the witnesses, she is the key witness. If anyone could turn the case around, in the sense of giving new testimony towards proving Lee innocent, it's Marina. Like many fellow researchers, I bet she was not entirely honest when she testified.

Marina could, IMO, open the biggest scab the US has ever seen by filing a wrongful death lawsuit against the DPD. I'm sure there are attorneys out there that would jump at the chance to represent her, and do it for free. So why wouldn't she? Although she has changed her opinion as to Lee's guilt, Marina has steadfastly stuck to two main points that have driven assassination researchers crazy for years.

1. The Walker incident

2. The backyard photos

Marina has never wavered that Lee had a rifle, and practiced with it. Her testimony to the WC and HSCA was nearly identical concerning the Walker shooting attempt and the backyard photos. She also indicated to the HSCA she was never told by anyone what to say to the WC.

HSCA deposition:

Q. Do you recall testifying before the Warren Commission?

A. Yes; I do.

Q. Did anyone ever tell you what you should testify to them?

A. No.

Q. Did anyone ever suggest to you in any way how you should testify, or what you should say to the Warren Commission?

A. No.

Q. to your knowledge, as you sit here today, is there anything which you testified to before the Warren Commission which you now believe to be incorrect?

A. No; I never read my own testimony but whatever I said was the truth.

Q. I will show you those two photographs which are marked JFK exhibit No. 1 and exhibit No. 2, do you recognize those two photographs?

A. I sure do. I have seen them many times.

Q. What are they?

A. That is the pictures that I took.

Q. What do you recall as far as the circumstances leaking up to you taking these pictures and when you actually took them and what happened?

A. I do believe it was a weekend and he asked me to take a picture of him and I refused because I don't know how to take pictures. That is the only pictures I ever took in my whole life. So we argued over it and I thought the pose, or whatever he was wearing was just horrible, but he insisted that I just click, just push the button and I believe I did it twice and that was it. I do not know whether he developed them, at home or somewhere else, I have no idea.

Q. What is he wearing in those photographs and what is he holding?

A. What was a surprise for me was for him to hold his rifle and a pamphlet, some kind of newspaper. It puzzled me, it was a ridiculous way to pose for a picture.

Q. Does he also have a pistol in his arm?

A. I don't see that, it looks like it-yes, I see now.

Q. And you recall testifying about these same two photographs when you testified to the Warren Commission?

A. Yes; I remember them asking if I ever took the pictures and I had completely forgotten because it was only once in my life and I didn't know who to take pictures. Yes, when they showed me that, yes, I did take the pictures.

Q. The camera you took them on, was that Lee Harvey Oswald's camera?

A. I believe so.

Q. Was it the same one he had in Russia or a different one, do you know?

A. I don't know, but I do believe it could be the same.

Q. What did he tell you to do with the camera as far as taking the pictures?

A. He just told me which button to push and I did.

Q. Did you hold it up to your eye and look through the viewer to take the picture?

A. Yes.

Q. And after you took the picture what did you do after you took the first picture?

A. I went into the house and did things I had to attend to.

Q. How many pictures did you take?

A. I think I took two.

Q. When you took the first picture you held it up to your eye?

A. Yes; that is what I recall.

Q. What did you do next?

A. I believe he did something with it and told me to push it again.

Q. The first time you pushed it down to take the picture?

A. Yes.

Q. And the first time, what happened before you took the second picture?

A. He changed his pose.

Q. What I am getting at is, did you give the camera to him so he would move the film forward or did you do that?

A. He did that.

Q. So you took the picture and handed the camera to him?

A. Yes.

Q. What did he do?

A. He said, "Once again," and I did it again.

Q. So he have you back the camera?

A. For the second time; yes.

Q. Did he put the rifle down?

A. You see, that is the way I remember it.

Q. Did he put the rifle down on the ground between--

A. I don't remember. I was so annoyed with all this procedure so the sooner I could get through, the better, so I don't recollect.

Q. But you do remember taking the picture?

A. Yes; I am the one who took the picture and the weather was right.

Q. What did you say?

A. Somebody speculated the picture couldn't be taken; the weather was wrong.

Q. I am not interested in what people speculated.

A. There is nobody to blame for it but me.

Q. When you took the first picture and you gave him the camera, did you walk over to him and give him the camera or did he walk over to you?

A. I don't remember.

Q. Are these the only two pictures you ever took in your life at least up to that time?

A. Yes.

Q. When was the first time when you were living in Dallas that you saw that Lee owned a rifle?

A. I really don't remember the day or month.

Q. No the day or month but what was the first occasion? What were the circumstances when you saw it?

A. I don't remember. What is the first time you remember seeing the rifle currently?

A. I believe it was in Dallas but I would not be sure. I would not swear it it. Believe me, I tried to remember my best recollection.

Q. I am just asking now that you do remember, what was the circumstance? was it in a closet? Was he holding it? What was the first time you currently remember seeing the rifle, any rifle?

A. Well, the things flash in my memory right now of him going out after dard wearing a raincoat and he told me that he was going to practice in some shooting range. I don't mean that was the first time as I see it flashing right now.

Q. It may not be the first time but you remember one incident when he was in the raincoat?

A. Yes.

Q. And you saw the rifle at that time?

A. I am not saying that is the first time.

Q. But you saw it at that time?

A. And down in New Orleans he was sitting in the dark on the porch.

Q. The time you saw him in the raincoat, was that before you moved to New Orleans or after?

A. I believe it was in Dallas because it was quite hot outside. I mean it was very silly for somebody to put a raincoat over your body in such hot weather.

Q. I was not going to rain that day?

A. No.

Q Did you see the rifle or did you ask him, "Why are you wearing a raincoat?"

A. I probably did but I do not remember the conversation.

Q. Did you ask him where he was going to go practicing?f

A. Well, he said that you can take a bus and go somewhere but I don't know where.

Q. Did you see the rifle itself at that time?

A. I don't remember if it had any cover to it. I don't remember.

Q. It was at night after--

A. I was after dark.

Q. After dark.

A. It was very dark but whatever time, it started getting kind of in between.

Q. Did you ask him how he could go target shooting in the dark?

A. It never occurred to me. I have to explain, I never had any interesting rifles.

Q. You said you didn't like guns.

A. No; but I never took Lee seriously with this thing. I thought a boy playing awith a big toy and that it would be just temporary. I never realized how serious it was at the time.

Q. When was the first time that you say that Lee possessed a gun as opposed to a rifle?

A. I honestly don't remember.

Q. What is the first time you remember seeing the gun?

A. Just a minute. Could that be when he asked me to take the picture of him and he was wearing this gun or golding the rifle?

Q. He had a gun in that picture.

A. Yes; and it was ridiculous to take a picture. I was puzzling me why anybody would want to take a picture dressed like that with all the equipment.

Q. Did you ask him?

A. Yes. We had a fuss and a fight over it.

Q. About the gun and the rifle?

A. Yes.

Q. What did he say?

A. The picture was taken and it was ridiculous.

Q. Did you ask him though about the gun and the rifle and tell him that you didn't like the guns? He knew that.

A. He knew that.

Q. What was his reaction?

A. That it was none of my business.

Q. Apart from the time Lee went ot go target shooting that you have told us about, what other times do you remember seeing the rifle?

A. Well, like in New Orleans he would be sitting and cleaning and polishing the silly thing.

Q. And when you saw cleaning, what was he doing to the rifle?

A. Oh, he was putting rags around and putting oil or something on it.

Q. Did he do that in Dallas as well?

A. He might have, but I do not remember it not to give you the detailed description of it.

Q. When was the first time that Lee told you he had used the rifle apart from the target practice?

A. I think the General Walker incident.

Q. Could you relate the details of that incident to us now?

A. Well, I really cannot describe the details but the would be quite accurate in the testimony that I gave at the Warren Commission and if you refresh my memory I might be able to tell you.

Q. What happened the days before the Walder incident; did Lee act unusual at all?

A. Well he would be sitting--he made a little kind of not an office, a little closet that he has a chair there and maybe a desk-not a desk, improvisation of a desk, and he would be writing something down and he told me to to bother him so he was quite secretive about it.

Q. And that was a few days before?

A. A few days, a few weeks. I do not remember exactly the time.

Q. Was Lee restless a few days before the incident? Was he calm? Did he sleep well?

A. I don't recall his mood.

Q. Did Lee ever talk in his sleep?

A. Not that I remember.

Q. Again in the book "Marina and Lee" you said that a few days prior to the Walker incident you recollect that he was talking in his sleep.

A. that could be true.

Q. Do you remember, would he talk in English or would he talk in Russian.

A. I don't remember the incident right now.

Q. Did Lee go to work the day that he told you he shot at General Walker?

A. I don't remember the incident right now.

Q. Did Lee go to work the day that he told you he shot at General Walker?

A. I don't remember that either. What day of the week was it?

Q. It was a Wednesday.

A. Was it Wednesday? Well, I am sorry. I simply do not remember.

Q. How did Lee first tell you about the shooting of General Walker?

A. Well, he was gone most of the night and came home very late and turned the radio on.

Q. How did you feel that evening when he did not come home?

A. He did not come home for a long time and I do believe that I found a note addressed to me what to do in case something happened to him and I was petrified and didn't know what to do.

Q. When did you find the note?

A. After he went out.

Q. Was it unusual for him to be out late?

A. No; since he was leaving the house sometimes for this practicing that he supposedly was going to.

Q. So you were not surprised that he was out that evening?

A. Well, I was surprised that he came home that late.

Q. Were you worried where he was?

A. Of course I was.

Q. Did you contact anybody?

A. No; I didn't.

Q. What did he say when he returned?

A. Well, he turned the radio on and he was very pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to station. I asked him what it was all about and he said that he tried to shoot General Walker. I told him how dare you take somebody's life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right to do it. He said, see, if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you will do justice to humanity so since I don't know anything about the man I should not talk about it.

Q. Did you know who General Walder was?

A. He told me he was a Fascist. That is all I know.

Q. Had you heard the name before?

A. No.

Q. Did Lee ever mention to you a man named Scotty?

A. No.

Q. Did Lee ever--

A. Just a minute. I heard this name before and I don't know if it came from Lee or somebody that he could be working with. I think it is a little but confusing. Scotty could be a dog. I am sorry.

Q. Did he ever mention a man who spoke with a Scottish accent?

A. Oh, you mean with a Scottish accent? No; never.

Q. Did he ever mention a man who lived with General Walker?

A. No; I thought the man lived alone after what I read later on.

Q. When Lee came back that night was he disheveled?

A. What's disheveled?

Q. Was he dirty? Were his clothes still neat?

A. Well, honestly I only remember that he was very pale and that is all I recall.

Q. When do you recall him leaving the house that day prior to his shooting at General Walker?

A. I don't recall if he came from work and then left or whether he left after work. I don't remember.

Q. Was he dressed in the same clothes that you saw him previously when he returned?

A. I just don't remember.

Q. Did he have the rifle with him when he came back?

A. No; I think he said he left it hidden somewhere and I do believe the next day at night he went and got it. That is what I remember right now. That is the testimony I am giving you, what I remember.

Q. That is what we want, your present recollection. Did he tell you he had shot at him with a rifle or did he mention that he had used a gun?

A. Well, I think it was a rifle.

Q. Did he tell you where he hid the rifle or the gun?

A. I think he might have mentioned that it was in the shrubs somewhere.

Q. Did you discuss with him whether it would be found and the police would be looking for him?

A. It was such an unpleasant and terrifying incident that I was just trembling all day long. I was looking through the windows; I was expecting police coming any second.

Q. Did you suggest to Lee that he go back and get the gun or rifle or did he do it by himself?

A. I think he did it by himself.

Q. What did he do with the gun or the rifle when he went back and got it?

A. Kept it in the house.

Q. Did you see it again?

A. Well, I never made a point of going and checking the rifle every day to see whether is was there or not.

Q. Where in the house would he keep it?

A. In the closet.

Q. On a shelf or was it on the floor?

A. I don't remember.

Q. Was it wrapped in anything?

A. It could be just kind of stanking in the corner.

Q. Proppoed up in the corner of the closet?

A. It could be.

Q. Was it covered? Was it wrapped in anything?

A. I don't remember.

Q. Was the closet crowded? Did it have many things in it?

A. Usually his personal belongings, his clothes, his books, whatever, and he told me to stay out of it; that is his own private thing.

Q. This was his closet?

A. Yes.

Q. If you opened the closet, was it easy to get the rifle or did you have to move a lot of things aside before you got it?

A. I never did it.

Q. If you opened the closet door, would you see the rifle immediately?

A. I don't remember.

Q. The photographs you took of Lee with the rifle and the pistol, do you know where Lee developed those photos?

A. Well, didn't he work for some time with photography?

Q. You don't know where he developed the films?

A. No.

Q. Did he have any photographic supplies around the house?

A. It is so hard to dig through your memory that long back. He might have; I don't know.

Q. When you saw the rifle that he had, was that the same rifle he had in Russia?

A. I don't remember. How can you transport a gun from one country to another when you have to go through the inspection on the border?

Q. So you don't think he brought the gun with him?

A. I don't see how it logically or possibly could happen. Oh, you mean the same gun. Well, he bought the rifle right here.

Q. He bought it here?

A. Yes.

Q. How did he buy the rifle here?

A. Well, I learned later afterward that he ordered through some mail.

Q. At that time did you know that he had ordered a rifle?

A. Well, since I had seen the rifle I knew he purchased it. How he purchased it I do not know.

Q. The first time you saw it did you ask him, "Where did you get the rifle?"

A. No; but I was very upset that he spent money on such an unnecessary, stupid thing then we barely could survive on what he was making.

Q. Did you ask him how much it cost?

A. No.

Q. Where did Lee keep his gun? The rifle was in the closet.

A. Well, it never was on display on the wall but everybody can see it. It was always hidden somewhere back in the closet. We did not live in one place very long; we moved from apartment to the apartment.

Q. In the apartment where the rifle was kept in the closet, was the gun also kept there or was it dept somewhere else?

A. I assume it was together.

Q. Did you see it in that closet?

A. Well, see, my recollection about-do you recall the gun?

Q. Yes.

A. The pictures I took showed two.

Q. It showed a rifle and a gun.

A. Yes.

Q. the question I have is just where did he keep the gun if the rifle was in the closet?

A. I honestly do not know.

Q. When you were living with Lee at this time, did he ever take the gun out to go target shooting with that as well as the rifle?

A. I recall only the rifle because it was quite bulky and he had to hide it under his raincoat but I do not recall the gun at all.

Q. When he brought the rifle back after he had hid it in the bushes from General Walker's house, what did he carry it in? He didn't just carry the rifle over his shoulder.

A. No; he didn't, but I told you that he was wearing this raincoat.

How does one reconcile her statements? Perhaps that why she decided "she has given up because she tried all she could".

PS: The Oprah interview: http://www.jfkresearch.com/marina/marina.htm

Edited by Richard J. Smith
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Richard

Very nice job on the Marina Oswald testimony.

It disapoints me that so many people are unwilling to deal with the Walker incident. It is as if researchers have closed the door on this topic in a misguided belief that if they accept the incident as real they will be embracing a part of the Warren Report.

Needless to say I have embraced it as true but feel that Walker is a window into a world of mirrors. In the movie JFK they make reference to an Alice in Wonderland type of world that as I have studied Walker I believe may actually exist (Nosenko case as an example where nobody is willing to reveal the whole truth perhaps because nobody is really sure of what the whole truth is).

From the Testimony of Edwin Anderson Walker

Mr. Liebeler.

I would like to have the record show that prior to the commencement of this deposition, a discussion between General Watts and General Walker and myself was had in which we reached an agreement under which a copy of the transcript of the testimony which will be taken here today will be made available here at the office of the U.S. attorney for examination by General Walker and by his counsel. They will be given an opportunity to make whatever changes in the testimony may be necessary, so that the transcript reflects accurately what happened here today.

We also agreed and confirmed in a telephone conversation with Mr. Rankin, the general counsel for the Commission, that as soon as a copy can reasonably be made available, within 2 or 3 days after this transcript has been signed by General Walker and approved by me, a copy of the transcript will be made available to General Walker at his expense. It may be purchased from the court reporter here in Dallas. We will make whatever arrangements may seem proper at that time to give the general a corrected copy. Would you state your full name for the record, please?

A) Edwin A. Walker. A stands for Anderson.

Q) What is your address?

A) 4011 Turtle Creek Boulevard, Dallas, Tex.

Q) How long have you lived there?

A) I believe since December of 1961 or January of 1962. I am not sure of the month I moved in.

Q) I don't think we have to indicate a great deal of your background for the record, since I think we all know who you are, but you are a retired major general, are you not?

A) No. I am former major general, now resigned from the U.S. Army.

I believe the Warren Report is a masterfull coverup of a great deal of information. The beginning of this testimony becomes a striking example when you open the book on Walkers military "backround." Development of Special Forces, Special Operations, Covert War (Greece), etc., etc., etc. and close association with Maxwell Taylor.

I have used the phrase, "Forrest Gump like life" to discribe General Walker. He is always everywhere but people seem to ignore his life as many people ingore the simpleton or homeless person they see on the streets of there own hometowns.

As researchers, weather we like it or not, General Edwin Anderson Walker, is on our turf. Do we continue to ignore him or do we face the reality of this ugly truth?

Jim Root

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Just to give an idea as to Marina's lack of complete grasp on the English language & American ways, here's an excerpt from her Orleans Parish Grand Jury Testimony, page 71. 

Juror Do you still see Ruth Paine?

Marina: No, I like her and appreciate what she did. I was advised by Secret Service not to be connected with her, seems like she was .. not connected .. she was sympathizing with the CIA. She wrote letters over there and they told me for my own reputation, to stay away.

Juror: The Secret Service told you this?

Marina: Yes.

Mr. Alcock: What did they say?

Marina: They didn't say anything personal about her, but they said it's better for me to stay away from her for a while, it seemed like she was sympathizing with CIA.

Nic,

Good stuff. The note in Anthony Summers' book, Not In Your Lifetime, page 424, reveals the following:

"It was an intercepted phone call between the phone numbers of Ruth Paine and her husband Michael - after the assassination - which picked up the curious remark 'We both know who is responsible' (other than Oswald)."

Tim

Edited by Tim Carroll
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I feel Marina Oswald has been deceptive about almost everything. Without her contradictory but damaging testimony before the Warren Commission, the official fairy tale would have no foundation. Virtually everthing we know (and most of us accept without question) about Oswald's actions during the weeks leading up to the assassination come from two sources; either Marina or the even more suspicious Ruth Paine. I can accept that Marina was coerced to lie before the authorities after the assassination, and out of understandable fear told them what they wanted to hear. However, when she suddenly changed her tune in the mid-'80s and started saying there was a conspiracy, she never addressed the obvious absurdity of much of her testimony.

Why didn't she reveal how she was threatened and forced to lie? Why didn't she retract the most obvious of her lies, including things almost no one believes, like her claim that she locked Oswald in the bathroom to stop him from shooting Nxon, for instance?

IMHO, believing in the validity of the backyard photos is the same as accepting the single bullet theory. Marina still touts the official line about these obviously fake photographs, and for that reason alone I don't trust her. She also have never retracted her claim about him shooting at Gen. Walker. Without her testimony about this, LHO would never have been connected to this incident.

It's interesting to hear that Marina has "done all she could" in this matter. In saying that, for once maybe she's being honest.

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I feel Marina Oswald has been deceptive about almost everything. Without her contradictory but damaging testimony before the Warren Commission, the official fairy tale would have no foundation. Virtually everthing we know (and most of us accept without question) about Oswald's actions during the weeks leading up to the assassination come from two sources; either Marina or the even more suspicious Ruth Paine. I can accept that Marina was coerced to lie before the authorities after the assassination, and out of understandable fear told them what they wanted to hear. However, when she suddenly changed her tune in the mid-'80s and started saying there was a conspiracy, she never addressed the obvious absurdity of much of her testimony.

Why didn't she reveal how she was threatened and forced to lie? Why didn't she retract the most obvious of her lies, including things almost no one believes, like her claim that she locked Oswald in the bathroom to stop him from shooting Nxon, for instance?

IMHO, believing in the validity of the backyard photos is the same as accepting the single bullet theory. Marina still touts the official line about these obviously fake photographs, and for that reason alone I don't trust her.  She also have never retracted her claim about him shooting at Gen. Walker. Without her testimony about this, LHO would never have been connected to this incident.

It's interesting to hear that Marina has "done all she could" in this matter. In saying that, for once maybe she's being honest.

_______________________________

No-one can bring a wrongful death action re LHO. Not Marnia, nor can June or Rachel. There is a statute of limitations on such, either 2 or at most 4 years in Tx. (I do criminal defense, so don't know the statutes on civil actions, but in general a tort, such as wrongful death- (or any personal injury)action is between 2-4 years, depending upon the action alleged.

Only murder has no statute of limitations, therefore we need a Dallas DA with the balls of Jim Garrison. Don't hold your breath.

But perhaps there is some other legal action a family member of Oswald could bring. I have been trying to come up with one since law school (early 80's) and learning about the concept of "standing". We have seen what our elected officials have done with this case, advancing some leads, but cutting short a true investigation. If anyone on this forum doubts that just read Fonzi's The Last Investigation. The AARB achieved success in the release of thousands of documents, but, much is still classified.

Oh sweet justice, will we ever see it???

Dawn

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I feel Marina Oswald has been deceptive about almost everything. Without her contradictory but damaging testimony before the Warren Commission, the official fairy tale would have no foundation. Virtually everthing we know (and most of us accept without question) about Oswald's actions during the weeks leading up to the assassination come from two sources; either Marina or the even more suspicious Ruth Paine. I can accept that Marina was coerced to lie before the authorities after the assassination, and out of understandable fear told them what they wanted to hear. However, when she suddenly changed her tune in the mid-'80s and started saying there was a conspiracy, she never addressed the obvious absurdity of much of her testimony.

Why didn't she reveal how she was threatened and forced to lie? Why didn't she retract the most obvious of her lies, including things almost no one believes, like her claim that she locked Oswald in the bathroom to stop him from shooting Nxon, for instance?

IMHO, believing in the validity of the backyard photos is the same as accepting the single bullet theory. Marina still touts the official line about these obviously fake photographs, and for that reason alone I don't trust her.  She also have never retracted her claim about him shooting at Gen. Walker. Without her testimony about this, LHO would never have been connected to this incident.

It's interesting to hear that Marina has "done all she could" in this matter. In saying that, for once maybe she's being honest.

_______________________________

No-one can bring a wrongful death action re LHO. Not Marnia, nor can June or Rachel. There is a statute of limitations on such, either 2 or at most 4 years in Tx. (I do criminal defense, so don't know the statutes on civil actions, but in general a tort, such as wrongful death- (or any personal injury)action is between 2-4 years, depending upon the action alleged.

Only murder has no statute of limitations, therefore we need a Dallas DA with the balls of Jim Garrison. Don't hold your breath.

But perhaps there is some other legal action a family member of Oswald could bring. I have been trying to come up with one since law school (early 80's) and learning about the concept of "standing". We have seen what our elected officials have done with this case, advancing some leads, but cutting short a true investigation. If anyone on this forum doubts that just read Fonzi's The Last Investigation. The AARB achieved success in the release of thousands of documents, but, much is still classified.

Oh sweet justice, will we ever see it???

Dawn

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