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My autobiography, Being There: Eyewitness to History, now on Amazon


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I acquired Mr. Caddy’s book during this past week when I  also acquired RFK Jr’s book, and the  Otto Skorzeny Papers and spent a lot of time on Jack Ruby’s testimony. However, I have read about a third of Mr Caddy’s book and can report clear writing, informative history,  lots of personal detail adding to the authenticity of the experience. In addition, he elaborates on the  thesis of the Hougan and Colodny books  of the past decades which open a door into the deep-state version of Watergate. Much of this book could be applied to the concept I tried to enunciate in the thread Trump and the Unspeakable?—how divisions within a government Branch can undermine a Presidency.

Not that I ever expect an actual definitive answer, but I always have felt – and Mr. Caddy’s book re-enforces that feeling – that the only “thing” that could have driven Nixon from office had to relate to the JFK killing. It was also refreshing to read details of Judge Sirica. He was portrayed as a hero by many and, other than that by Renata Adler, I had not read any in depth criticism of him. I am convinced that the tradition of the attorney-client relationship was abused by Sirica and justice suffered.

As a footnote of sorts, although I was in New York City during the actual break-in and during the Erwin Hearings, I was in Washington, D.C. during the second trial in 1975. I was appearing in a political conspiracy drama – Julius Caesar – at the Arena Stage and , once we started performing at night and I had days free, I went up to the Court house in the morning – joined by dozens of law students and other curiosity seekers—and waited in line for a chance to get a ticket to enter the courtroom. I used to joke that this production (in court) was better than ours (on stage). I  did get in one day – and heard some of John Dean talking on a tape. Judge Sirica became our hero when he “ordered” the staff to get those of us in line, some fold-up chairs to sit on while we waited.

Another thought – more than a footnote – jumps out of Mr. Caddy’s book. He doesn’t stress it or brag about it, just notes it .And that is as a 37 year old lawyer in Washington he had to face a lot of intimidating figures, traditions, and expectations that would have overwhelmed 90% of those put in that position. He stuck to his guns; he kept his integrity and maintained personal loyalties. I thought of JFK, as a 43 year old, injured Lieutenant, facing the Chiefs of Staff of the Armed Forces(the same guys who won World War II) and saying “no” to their plans called Northwoods and their invasion plans  for Cuba. It’s at moments like these that character is solidified if already in formation, or defined, if new to it all. It’s a version of the 60’s cry Question Authority and as relevant today as ever.

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  • 11 months later...

I can't give quite as glowing a review as the above poster, because I just started reading this book yesterday.  I have to confess that I'm already hooked, and I can see myself finishing it quickly before I go back to reread it more slowly for the details.

I did want to share one personal note.  When I try to describe what I'm reading to my other half, usually his eyes glaze over after about a minute.  This time, when I began my story with some of Mr. Caddy's background - including the fact that he had a personal tour of the historic Edison plant with then Governor Edison - I finally managed to hold my other half's interest.  No glazed eyes!

(Full disclosure:  My other half is more of a science/technical type who has a deep interest in the early history of audio recording.  Perhaps I should start all my stories with something similar?)

Anyway, I really look forward to finishing this book.  

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13 hours ago, Stephanie Goldberg said:

I can't give quite as glowing a review as the above poster, because I just started reading this book yesterday.  I have to confess that I'm already hooked, and I can see myself finishing it quickly before I go back to reread it more slowly for the details.

I did want to share one personal note.  When I try to describe what I'm reading to my other half, usually his eyes glaze over after about a minute.  This time, when I began my story with some of Mr. Caddy's background - including the fact that he had a personal tour of the historic Edison plant with then Governor Edison - I finally managed to hold my other half's interest.  No glazed eyes!

(Full disclosure:  My other half is more of a science/technical type who has a deep interest in the early history of audio recording.  Perhaps I should start all my stories with something similar?)

Anyway, I really look forward to finishing this book.  

I'll be interested in hearing your thoughts once you've finished the book. I was initially curious about the book, but decided against reading it. No disrespect intended, but Mr. Caddy seems to take seriously the idea that JFK was killed because of an intention to disclose the truth about UFO's. I'm not dismissing or discounting the idea of UFO's, but find the idea of the assassination to be a result of this intended disclosure to be impossible to accept. So that raised a red flag for me. I'm still curious about the book, but a little wary. If the aforementioned idea is taken seriously, what else might be be seen as credible or factual?

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21 hours ago, Darrell Curtis said:

I'll be interested in hearing your thoughts once you've finished the book. I was initially curious about the book, but decided against reading it. No disrespect intended, but Mr. Caddy seems to take seriously the idea that JFK was killed because of an intention to disclose the truth about UFO's. I'm not dismissing or discounting the idea of UFO's, but find the idea of the assassination to be a result of this intended disclosure to be impossible to accept. So that raised a red flag for me. I'm still curious about the book, but a little wary. If the aforementioned idea is taken seriously, what else might be be seen as credible or factual?

An author always finds fascinating when a new forum member reviews his book negatively and incorrectly states its content and then discloses that he has not even read the book.  Makes us old forum members wonder "what else might be seen as credible or factual" in future posts by this new member.

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4 hours ago, Douglas Caddy said:

An author always finds fascinating when a new forum member reviews his book negatively and incorrectly states its content and then discloses that he has not even read the book.  Makes us old forum members wonder "what else might be seen as credible or factual" in future posts by this new member.

Mr. Caddy, please note that what I wrote was *not* a book review. I'm unsure how you arrived at such a conclusion, as it clearly isn't. As I stated before, there's not any disrespect intended. I regret that my remarks offended you. I wasn't wanting a reaction or response necessarily, but if one was forthcoming, hoped that if that was the case, it might take the form of some sort of dialog, not this sort of resentful interaction that is so common here. I may be a new member, but I've frequented this forum since shortly after its inception. I'm all too familiar with the nature of the discussion here, and have no desire to engage in bitter or pointed exchanges. My comment is not without merit, as you appear to believe that JFK was murdered, at least in part, as a result of an intention to disclose the "truth" about UFO's.

My comments were not about the content of the book, but the content of comments and threads you've posted here over the last few years. I can't imagine why having doubts about someone else's opinion should be an issue. Opinions are not facts, and all should be free to question and doubt what others say. Otherwise all we have are a group of mindless believers, and that accomplishes nothing.

I would ask that you re-read my comments. In addition to observing that it isn't a book review, not a comment on the contents of the book, as such, also notice it isn't a personal attack. I'm simply expressing a hesitation that results from doubt. Doubt means that there's a possibility for the mind to change. I'm skeptical about the disclosure matter, but not closed minded. My comments are merely an extrapolation of your comments and threads, in regards to your book.

 

Thank you for your time.

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Talk about a fascinating book!   This was really good, a personal walk through some of the biggest events in history, accompanied by verbal snapshots of people whose names I've only previously read in newspapers and books.  What an adventure filled life, including the last chapter which deals with current events.  I kinda wish that the whole thing had been a little longer...

While I enjoyed the entire work from start to finish, I found myself captivated by the section on Gabe Caporino.  I had never previously heard of this man, and his story raises so many questions.  I saw the added letter from the FBI to his widow at the back of the book, but I was wondering if anything else has ever been determined about his fate?

 

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56 minutes ago, Stephanie Goldberg said:

Talk about a fascinating book!   This was really good, a personal walk through some of the biggest events in history, accompanied by verbal snapshots of people whose names I've only previously read in newspapers and books.  What an adventure filled life, including the last chapter which deals with current events.  I kinda wish that the whole thing had been a little longer...

While I enjoyed the entire work from start to finish, I found myself captivated by the section on Gabe Caporino.  I had never previously heard of this man, and his story raises so many questions.  I saw the added letter from the FBI to his widow at the back of the book, but I was wondering if anything else has ever been determined about his fate?

 

Well, it sounds like it's worth a read. For 12.00 and shipping it seems you can't go wrong.

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I must order this book right away as well.

Doug Caddy's life has been remarkable.

His personal one-on-one encounters with so many important key figures directly involved in the most major intrigue events in our highest levels of political power and government since before Nixon is uniquely amazing.

Billy Sol Estes, E.Howard Hunt, Guy Banister, Marina Oswald, Roger Stone just to name a few!

He stands out in this forum because of his incredibly connected life.

 

Edited by Joe Bauer
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