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John Dolva
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Could someone say what this insignia signifies, please? One of the policemen leading the arrested tramps has it on his sleeve.

(It's the same as emblems of many right wing groups use including the KKK. A variant of a celtioc cross I believe. It is probably just something innocent like traffic perhaps. But it would be good to know as various people have described elements in the DPD as very right wing.)

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Could someone say what this insignia signifies, please? One of the policemen leading the arrested tramps has it on his sleeve.

(It's the same as emblems of many right wing groups use including the KKK. A variant of a celtioc cross I believe. It is probably just something innocent like traffic perhaps. But it would be good to know as various people have described elements in the DPD as very right wing.)

John, looks like the Minute Man symbol, if I recall it right there was a thread about this group in connection with General Walker.

George

Edited by George Bollschweiler
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Could someone say what this insignia signifies, please? One of the policemen leading the arrested tramps has it on his sleeve.

(It's the same as emblems of many right wing groups use including the KKK. A variant of a celtioc cross I believe. It is probably just something innocent like traffic perhaps. But it would be good to know as various people have described elements in the DPD as very right wing.)

Finally found it, its part of Jack White's work

George

http://www.jfkresearch.com/morningstar/morningstar5.htm

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Could someone say what this insignia signifies, please? One of the policemen leading the arrested tramps has it on his sleeve.

(It's the same as emblems of many right wing groups use including the KKK. A variant of a celtioc cross I believe. It is probably just something innocent like traffic perhaps. But it would be good to know as various people have described elements in the DPD as very right wing.)

Here are two other photos of what you're referring to:

Not being in color, it's hard to say, but to me it looks suspiciously like a first-aid Red Cross! :)

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Maybe a better look at it.

- lee

--------------------------------

The patch on the officer's lower left sleeve means that he is "Certified" as having passed "The American Red Cross Life Saving Course". The course before the late 1960s centered on Swimmer/Drowning "Rescuscitation", as "C.P.R." [and "mouth-to-mouth"] was not yet approved by the A.R.C. !!

In order for a police officer [or firefighter] to be elegible for the "Water-Recovery Squad", he had to: Not only have passed said course of instruction; but must exhibit the patch on his sleeve upon showing up at a "Water Incident" -- or he would be prohibited from donning the rescue gear !!

Chairs,

GPH

__________________________

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Maybe a better look at it.

- lee

--------------------------------

The patch on the officer's lower left sleeve means that he is "Certified" as having passed "The American Red Cross Life Saving Course". The course before the late 1960s centered on Swimmer/Drowning "Rescuscitation", as "C.P.R." [and "mouth-to-mouth"] was not yet approved by the A.R.C. !!

In order for a police officer [or firefighter] to be elegible for the "Water-Recovery Squad", he had to: Not only have passed said course of instruction; but must exhibit the patch on his sleeve upon showing up at a "Water Incident" -- or he would be prohibited from donning the rescue gear !!

Chairs,

GPH

__________________________

Thank you all, the firstaid Redcross makes sense.

The Minute men angle is interesting to look at as well, as they seem to have a number of first aid/emergency groups that use a similar cross. In looking at that, a booklet on minute men and CAP connections was found. (correction) which as an aside links to a cordial Luce-Churchill relationship. I wonder if the term 'Minute men' is used too broadly here to cover different groups?

Edited by John Dolva
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Thank you all, the firstaid Redcross makes sense.

The Minute men angle is interesting to look at as well, as they seem to have a number of first aid/emergency groups that use a similar cross. In looking at that, a booklet on minute men and CAP connections was found. Also connection to antiChurcill irish minute men.(which as an aside links to a cordial Luce-Churchill relationship. I wonder if the term 'Minute men' is used too broadly here to cover different groups?

In the United States - or actually, a little before that - the first "Minute Men" were New England revolutionaries who would be "ready in a minute" to defend against British soldiers. For the most part, similarly named organizations are referring to being "ready in a minute."

The Morris Minute Men whose patch you displayed, for example, are a non-profit volunteer organization providing emergency medical services to Morris Township and Morris Plains, New Jersey. They were formed in 1941, well before the "Minutemen" connected with Edwin Walker. The Morris Minute Men are not the medical corps for the Minutemen now volunteering to secure our southern borders! :)

I'd be interested in hearing about "connections" between Minutemen and the Civil Air Patrol. I've been in contact with folks at CAP Headquarters about the supposed connection with them and one Colonel D Harold Byrd, who supposedly co-founded the CAP (but who I - associated with CAP from 1964 through 1978 myself - had never heard of), who was a friend of LBJ and who owned the TSBD. It would be interesting to hear what they've got to say about their "connections" with the extreme right ....

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Thank you all, the firstaid Redcross makes sense.

The Minute men angle is interesting to look at as well, as they seem to have a number of first aid/emergency groups that use a similar cross. In looking at that, a booklet on minute men and CAP connections was found. Also connection to antiChurcill irish minute men.(which as an aside links to a cordial Luce-Churchill relationship. I wonder if the term 'Minute men' is used too broadly here to cover different groups?

In the United States - or actually, a little before that - the first "Minute Men" were New England revolutionaries who would be "ready in a minute" to defend against British soldiers. For the most part, similarly named organizations are referring to being "ready in a minute."

The Morris Minute Men whose patch you displayed, for example, are a non-profit volunteer organization providing emergency medical services to Morris Township and Morris Plains, New Jersey. They were formed in 1941, well before the "Minutemen" connected with Edwin Walker. The Morris Minute Men are not the medical corps for the Minutemen now volunteering to secure our southern borders! :)

I'd be interested in hearing about "connections" between Minutemen and the Civil Air Patrol. I've been in contact with folks at CAP Headquarters about the supposed connection with them and one Colonel D Harold Byrd, who supposedly co-founded the CAP (but who I - associated with CAP from 1964 through 1978 myself - had never heard of), who was a friend of LBJ and who owned the TSBD. It would be interesting to hear what they've got to say about their "connections" with the extreme right ....

http://history.nhq.cap.gov/Historical_Reading.htm

the other two photos here are from protest against Churchill* and from a minute men air force ammunition management unit. I thought it was interesting because of the Klan hood look of the airplane and with a cross background.

(*umbrella man)

Edited by John Dolva
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http://history.nhq.cap.gov/Historical_Reading.htm

the other two photos here are from protest against Churchill* and from a minute men air force ammunition management unit. I thought it was interesting because of the Klan hood look of the airplane and with a cross background.

(*umbrella man)

CAP's deal is a three-blade propellor, but I'm sure you knew that. :)

I suspect it will be a while before I hear from CAP about Byrd: I just sent the query this morning, tho' I'd drafted it weeks ago. Your post prompted me to finish and send it, so thanks! They've read it (just got the read-receipt), but any amount of money it has to go through channels - and legal! - before any substantive response.

Luckily, I've got some good (albeit old) creds with them! ;)

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Thank you all, the firstaid Redcross makes sense.

The Minute men angle is interesting to look at as well, as they seem to have a number of first aid/emergency groups that use a similar cross. In looking at that, a booklet on minute men and CAP connections was found. Also connection to antiChurcill irish minute men.(which as an aside links to a cordial Luce-Churchill relationship. I wonder if the term 'Minute men' is used too broadly here to cover different groups?

In the United States - or actually, a little before that - the first "Minute Men" were New England revolutionaries who would be "ready in a minute" to defend against British soldiers. For the most part, similarly named organizations are referring to being "ready in a minute."

The Morris Minute Men whose patch you displayed, for example, are a non-profit volunteer organization providing emergency medical services to Morris Township and Morris Plains, New Jersey. They were formed in 1941, well before the "Minutemen" connected with Edwin Walker. The Morris Minute Men are not the medical corps for the Minutemen now volunteering to secure our southern borders! :)

I'd be interested in hearing about "connections" between Minutemen and the Civil Air Patrol. I've been in contact with folks at CAP Headquarters about the supposed connection with them and one Colonel D Harold Byrd, who supposedly co-founded the CAP (but who I - associated with CAP from 1964 through 1978 myself - had never heard of), who was a friend of LBJ and who owned the TSBD. It would be interesting to hear what they've got to say about their "connections" with the extreme right ....

The sysmbol of the "official" Minutemen was a cross-hairs in a circle. This was Bob's DPugh's organization. He wrote a monthly newsletter called "On Target" with this symbol on the front. Here's a small bit from

http://dneiwert.blogspot.com/2005/05/minuteman-history.html

"Led by a Missouri man named Robert DePugh, the Minutemen not only believed that government had been infiltrated at its highest levels by Communists, but that a Communist takeover was virtually inevitable; therefore, they told their believers, you should arm yourselves with whatever weaponry would be effective as a counterforce to strike back when the takeover occurred. DePugh, a onetime associate of [JBS founder] Robert Welch before DePugh was dropped from the John Birch Society, also told his followers to harass "the enemy," and compiled at his headquarters a list of 1,500 people he identified as members of the "Communist hidden

government," with the intent to assassinate them in the event of the Communist coup.

The Minutemen soon became associated with groups like Wesley Swift's Church of Jesus Christ Christian, a Christian Identity church located in Hollywood. Swift preached the "two-seed" brand of Identity, holding that not only are white people are the true Israelites and descendants of Adam, but that blacks, Asians, and other non-whites thus are "pre-Adamic" people without souls, and Jews are either descendants of Satan himself (the offspring of conjugal relations with Eve) or practitioners of a Satanic religion. Among Swift's more notable adherents: retired Col. William Potter Gale, a former MacArthur aide who eventually became a key figure in Posse Comitatus; and a quiet-spoken Lockheed engineer named Richard Girnt Butler.

Also in attendance at Swift's Sunday services was Keith Gilbert, a gunshop owner who also was a Minutemen member. Gilbert was arrested in 1965 and convicted for the theft of 1,400 pounds of TNT that he later said was part of a plot to plant a bomb under the stage of the Hollywood Palladium during an Anti-Defamation League convention, and to detonate it during the keynote speech by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. -- a plot only disrupted by his arrest.

Other Minutemen were getting into trouble around the nation. The group was connected to an October 1966 plot, broken up by the FBI in New York City, to bomb three summer camps operated by liberal East Coast organizations. And illegal caches of weapons and ammunition linked to Minutemen kept popping up around the countryside.

By this point, though, DePugh had decided to move into the political arena. Using the Minutemen's agenda as a platform, he formed the Patriotic Party and made public speeches around the country touting its potential in the wake of Barry Goldwater's 1964 presidential election defeat. Two of those appearances were in Seattle in 1966. A mail-room employee of Seattle City Light named Duane I. Carlson put up $500 of his own money to sponsor the Northwest convention of the Patriotic Party at the Hyatt House. A few months later, DePugh made a stump speech for a November Patriotic Party gathering; some 600 people, paying $1 apiece, were in attendance. DePugh, however, only spoke to the crowd by a telephone hookup. The Minutemen's fearless leader was temporarily indisposed: he and an associate had been recently convicted on a variety of felony firearms violations and sentenced just the week before to four years in prison.

Over the next year, DePugh fought that conviction, and managed to stay out of jail through a string of appeals. But the legal troubles started taking their toll on the organization's finances -- and pressure mounted to find alternative sources of revenue.

Soon, Duane Carlson's activities moved well beyond public meetings. He gathered a group of six other Seattle-area men -- a longshoreman, a church sexton, a grocery clerk, a civilian driver at the Fort Lewis Army Base, a self-employed draftsman, and an unemployed ship's oiler -- and began plotting ways to finance the Minutemen's arms operations and strike a blow against the "Communist controlled" government at the same time. Their plan: set off a bomb at the city hall of a small Seattle suburb, Redmond, while simultaneously detonating another at the local power station, thereby creating a major distraction while taking out police communications at the same time. This would enable the gang to strike three Redmond banks they had targeted for a series of successive robberies.

Their downfall, however, came when a federal informant infiltrated the group. On the day the Minutemen planned to strike -- January 26, 1967 -- the FBI swooped down on them in two parking lots, one in Bellevue and another in Lake City, where the conspirators were meeting to carry out their plot, and arrested all seven. DePugh denied they were part of his organization, claiming Carlson had been dropped from his rolls for "non-payment of dues." Federal prosecutors, who found evidence that DePugh actually was party to the plan from its early stages, put out a warrant for his arrest."

---------------------------------------------------------

(Me)

Walker became an "official" member of the Minutemen after he donated some money to DePugh. I'm sure Bill Turner could provide a lot more detail.

Dave

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The sysmbol of the "official" Minutemen was a cross-hairs in a circle. This was Bob's DPugh's organization. He wrote a monthly newsletter called "On Target" with this symbol on the front. Here's a small bit from http://dneiwert.blogspot.com/2005/05/minuteman-history.html

...

Walker became an "official" member of the Minutemen after he donated some money to DePugh. I'm sure Bill Turner could provide a lot more detail.

Dave

It is interesting that groups such as these often adopt something, whether a name or a symbol, that seems innocuous at least, and can be mistakenly associated with something else benign or benevolent at best. Another good example is the States Rights Parties (or National SRP), which was an offshoot of KKK and JBS if I remember my history correctly: one of the founders' explicit comments was to the effect that membership in an organization with a name like that "wouldn't cause you to lose your job."

Walker denied membership with the Minutemen in his WC deposition, even though he was recognized in Dallas and parts beyond as one of its "leaders." He was not asked about JBS membership.

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The sysmbol of the "official" Minutemen was a cross-hairs in a circle. This was Bob's DPugh's organization. He wrote a monthly newsletter called "On Target" with this symbol on the front. Here's a small bit from http://dneiwert.blogspot.com/2005/05/minuteman-history.html

...

Walker became an "official" member of the Minutemen after he donated some money to DePugh. I'm sure Bill Turner could provide a lot more detail.

Dave

It is interesting that groups such as these often adopt something, whether a name or a symbol, that seems innocuous at least, and can be mistakenly associated with something else benign or benevolent at best. Another good example is the States Rights Parties (or National SRP), which was an offshoot of KKK and JBS if I remember my history correctly: one of the founders' explicit comments was to the effect that membership in an organization with a name like that "wouldn't cause you to lose your job."

Walker denied membership with the Minutemen in his WC deposition, even though he was recognized in Dallas and parts beyond as one of its "leaders." He was not asked about JBS membership.

(I'm working from memory here again.) The National States Rights Party was founded circa 1957 by J.B. Stoner and Ed Fields. It was pretty small at the time but grew over the years.

Members of the NSRP that are of interest - Guy Banister's secretary Delphine Roberts, Joe Milteer, Dan Burros. Burros name and address were in Oswald's address book.

Dave

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Don't overlook the potential of .22 long rifles, pistols or rifles, as guerilla warfare or resistance weapons...The .22 can be silenced completely with materials that are always available. Although the .22 lacks killing power, this can be readily increased by filling hollow point bullets with poison.

Robert DePugh, Jan. 1962

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Could someone say what this insignia signifies, please? One of the policemen leading the arrested tramps has it on his sleeve.

John:

Twenty five years ago [or thereabouts.... where does the time go?], I wrote to the Dallas Police Department inquiring about just that insignia. I received a gracious reply from the Chief of the DPD [billy Joe Lord? ...memory is not what it used to be....] with an insignia as a keepsake. It is, in fact, a Red Cross badge.

FWIW.....

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