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Larrie Schmidt


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Harry Dean has argued that the gunman who killed JFK were soldiers who served under General Edwin Walker. I only know of two of Walker's soldiers who were in Dallas on the day of the assassination: Bernard Weissman and Larrie Schmidt. There is already a discussion on Weissman here:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=660

I think it is worth taking a look at Larrie Schmidt. He was born in 1937. He joined the U.S. Army and served in Germany under Walker. Like several soldiers serving under Walker, Schmidt developed extreme right-wing views. In April 1961 Walker was accused of indoctrinating his troops with right-wing literature from the John Birch Society. With the agreement of President Kennedy, Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara relieved Walker of his command and announced an investigation into the affair. JFK was accused of trying to suppress the anti-Communist feelings of the military. Walker resigned from the army in protest about the way he had been treated.

While in the army Schmidt made friends with Bernard Weissman. While in Germany the two men discussed the possibility of establishing a right-wing political group when they returned to the United States.

Weissman was discharged in August 1963 but was unable to find work. Short of money, Weissman contacted Schmidt who at that time was living in Dallas. Schmidt told Weissman about his involvement in the attack on the liberal politician, Adlai Stevenson. According to Schmidt, this had been organized by Walker. Schmidt added that his brother was working as Walker's chauffeur and general aide.

Schmidt invited Weissman to Dallas. Weissman later told the Warren Commission that Schmidt argued: "If we are going to take advantage of the situation, or if you are," meaning me, "you better hurry down here and take advantage of the publicity, and at least become known among these various right-wingers, because this is the chance we have been looking for to infiltrate some of these organizations and become known," in other words, go along with the philosophy we had developed in Munich."

Weissman arrived in Dallas on 4th November, 1963. Soon afterwards Schmidt got Weissman to join an organization called the Young Americans for Freedom. Schmidt also introduced Weissman to Joe Grinnan of the John Birch Society. Grinnan was involved in organizing protests against the visit of John F. Kennedy. Grinnan seemed to know about the visit before it was officially announced to the public. Grinnan suggested that they should place a black-bordered advert in the Dallas Morning News on 22nd November, 1963. The advert cost $1,465. Grinnan supplied the money. He claimed that some of this came from Nelson Bunker Hunt, the son of Haroldson L. Hunt. Weissman was given the task of signing the advert and taking it to the newspaper office.

The advert attacked Kennedy's foreign policy as being anti-American and communistic. This included the claim that Gus Hall, "head of the US Communist Party praised almost every one of your policies and announced that the party will endorse and support your re-election in 1964". It also attacked Kennedy's domestic policies. Another passage asked why Robert Kennedy had been allowed "to go soft on Communists, fellow-travelers, and ultra-leftists in America."

On 22nd November, 1963, Schmidt and Weissman met in a bar. Weissman was shocked by the assassination of JFK and told Schmidt he feared he would be accused of being involved in the killing. Weissman suspected that Kennedy had been killed by supporters of General Edwin Walker and that as a result he would be implicated in the plot. However, he told the Warren Commission he felt relieved when he discovered that Lee Harvey Oswald had been arrested for the murder. The Warren Commission did not ask how he knew that Oswald was not a right-winger. Despite this news, Schmidt, Weissman and Grinnan decided to leave Dallas staight away.

Weissman was found by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and was forced to testify before the Warren Commission. However, Larry Schmidt was never caught by the authorities.

Does anyone else have any information on Schmidt?

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So this is guilt by association, John?

Young Americans for Freedom was, as I recall, a moderate conservative organization with intellectual underpinnings. I believe that William F. Buckley was instrumental in its founding. I will research its background.

This is not to say there were not right-wing "nuts" in YAF. I have already stated that there were some fairly far-out right-wingers in the 1960s, just as there were far-out left-wingers. But you may not recall this but in 1962 or 1963 Buckley had essentially "removed" the Birchers and others of their ilk from the intellectual conservative movement.

If Schmidt was involved, that certainly does not indict YAF as an organization; nor does it indict any of its other members. Nor does it indict the conservative movement.

One of the reasons why I think Schmidt should be pursued is because flight can be an indication of guilt.

If Schmidt was involved and is still alive, he ought to be tried and sentenced to death. And I would gladly PAY for the privilege of injecting the poison into his veins.

Why on earth, John, did you think I would think Schmidt should not be pursued merely because he belonged to YAF?

Edited by Tim Gratz
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Young Americans for Freedom was, as I recall, a moderate conservative organization with intellectual underpinnings.  I believe that William F. Buckley was instrumental in its founding.  I will research its background.

This is not to say there were not right-wing "nuts" in YAF.  I have already stated that there were some fairly far-out right-wingers in the 1960s, just as there were far-out left-wingers.  But you may not recall this but in 1962 or 1963 Buckley had essentially "removed" the Birchers and others of their ilk from the intellectual conservative movement. 

I have started a new thread on this topic here:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=4437

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John, do I read your original post that Schmidt simply "dropped off radar" never to be seen again?  Or was I reading too much into what you wrote?

Tim, John,

Dick Russell had some interesting information on Weisman, Schmidt and Walker in his original verson of The Man Who Knew Too Much. He managed to track down and interview Weisman and also interviewed Walker. He also had some interesting information on what happened to Schmidt just after the assassination. It's been a while since I read Russell's book but I believe Schmidt was beat up and told to keep his mouth shut.

Dave

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David, thank you for your information.

I don't want to rehash the old "Dillon Didn't Do It" material here except to make the point I attempted to make on the "misdirection" thread. I believe there are enough "suspects" or "persons of interest" to be researched and investigated that we waste precious time arguing about Dillon and Papich. Based on Mr. Dean's reports and Schmidt's flight, it certainly seems he should be investigated. So should Albert Osborne, the Paines and (now I am beginning to think) Roy Truly.

If Schmidt was involved, is it possible he did not just disappear but was murdered?

Is it possible Schmidt was being manuevered to be a "right-wing" patsy?

Speaking of the possibility that Schmidt was murdered, conspiratorialists have discussed at length the issue of "mysterious deaths". Has anyone a list of witnesses and/or suspects who either disappeared or dropped out of sight?

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David, thank you for your information.

I don't want to rehash the old "Dillon Didn't Do It" material here except to make the point I attempted to make on the "misdirection" thread.  I believe there are enough "suspects" or "persons of interest" to be researched and investigated that we waste precious time arguing about Dillon and Papich.  Based on Mr. Dean's reports and Schmidt's flight, it certainly seems he should be investigated.  So should Albert Osborne, the Paines and (now I am beginning to think) Roy Truly.

If Schmidt was involved, is it possible he did not just disappear but was murdered?

Is it possible Schmidt was being manuevered to be a "right-wing" patsy?

Speaking of the possibility that Schmidt was murdered, conspiratorialists have discussed at length the issue of "mysterious deaths".  Has anyone a list of witnesses and/or suspects who either disappeared or dropped out of sight?

los escondidos, los desaparecidos...

:o coincidence or conspiracy, Tim, just in the last couple of days I've been wondering the same as I've got a slowly growing list of such disappeared ones.

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Most interesting, John! I do not recall ever seeing a treatise or discussion on "the disappeareds".

I see that John knows where Schmidt lives. From what has been stated, it certainly appears he ought to be interviewed--but only by a competent interviewer.

I had once suggested that the assassination research community could establish a fund to hire a very competent investigator to interview the witnesses and suspects who are still alive.

Edited by Tim Gratz
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Does anyone else have any information on Schmidt?

John, what about Larrie's brother Volkmar, who, according to Mae Brussel, started working for Walker on a full time base before Larrie did? Does he deserves the same attention as Larrie and if so, what about his role in the case. I think Jim Root maybe could have some more information because of his intrest and research of Gen. Edwin Walker.

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By way of background, Schmidt told the FBI he was, to quote the report, "originally from Lincoln, Nebraska... entered the army in 1954 and was discharged in 1957 as an enlisted man. He then worked for a while in 1959 as editor of the Culver City Citizen, Culver City, California. after that he again served in the US Army from 1959 to October, 1962..."

What he left out was what he was doing between 1957 and his commencent in 1959 with the Culver City Citizen.

The Feb 17, 1959 edition of the Lincoln Evening Journal and Nebraska State Journal fills in the gap. On page 16 it is reported in a School Notes column that "Larrie Henry Schmidt, son of Reuben Schmidt, was re-elected news editor of the Hurricane, University of Miami weekly student newspaper. He is a sophomore journalism major at UM's College of Arts and Sciences."

I have no idea why he would have left out telling the FBI about his Miami days, but I do wonder what the Hurricane was saying about Castro, and what friendships he may have made in Miami.

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By way of background, Schmidt told the FBI he was, to quote the report, "originally from Lincoln, Nebraska... entered the army in 1954 and was discharged in 1957 as an enlisted man. He then worked for a while in 1959 as editor of the Culver City Citizen, Culver City, California. after that he again served in the US Army from 1959 to October, 1962..."

What he left out was what he was doing between 1957 and his commencent in 1959 with the Culver City Citizen.

The Feb 17, 1959 edition of the Lincoln Evening Journal and Nebraska State Journal fills in the gap. On page 16 it is reported in a School Notes column that "Larrie Henry Schmidt, son of Reuben Schmidt, was re-elected news editor of the Hurricane, University of Miami weekly student newspaper. He is a sophomore journalism major at UM's College of Arts and Sciences."

I have no idea why he would have left out telling the FBI about his Miami days, but I do wonder what the Hurricane was saying about Castro, and what friendships he may have made in Miami.

Interesting information. Could it be that Schmidt was working as a FBI agent at the University of Miami? It is also strange that he should leave the job as editor of the Culver City Citizen to rejoin the army. He of course served under General Walker in Germany. After leaving the army in October, 1962, he moves to Dallas. Schmidt's brother then becomes Walker's chauffeur and general aide.

Schmidt invited Bernard Weissman to Dallas. Weissman later told the Warren Commission that Schmidt argued: "If we are going to take advantage of the situation, or if you are," meaning me, "you better hurry down here and take advantage of the publicity, and at least become known among these various right-wingers, because this is the chance we have been looking for to infiltrate some of these organizations and become known," in other words, go along with the philosophy we had developed in Munich."

Weissman arrived in Dallas on 4th November, 1963. Soon afterwards Schmidt got Weissman to join the Young Americans for Freedom. Schmidt also introduced Weissman to Joe Grinnan of the John Birch Society. Grinnan was involved in organizing protests against the visit of JFK. Grinnan seemed to know about the visit before it was officially announced to the public. Grinnan suggested that they should place a black-bordered advert in the Dallas Morning News on 22nd November, 1963. The advert cost $1,465. Grinnan supplied the money. He claimed that some of this came from Nelson Bunker Hunt, the son of Haroldson L. Hunt. Weissman was given the task of signing the advert and taking it to the newspaper office.

Do you know what job Schmidt did in Dallas? If his brother was Walker's general aide, what did Larrie do?

Have you got the date of this interview with the FBI? I thought the Warren Report said the FBI could not find Schmidt after the assassination (along with Weissman he fled from Dallas).

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By way of background, Schmidt told the FBI he was, to quote the report, "originally from Lincoln, Nebraska... entered the army in 1954 and was discharged in 1957 as an enlisted man. He then worked for a while in 1959 as editor of the Culver City Citizen, Culver City, California. after that he again served in the US Army from 1959 to October, 1962..."

What he left out was what he was doing between 1957 and his commencent in 1959 with the Culver City Citizen.

The Feb 17, 1959 edition of the Lincoln Evening Journal and Nebraska State Journal fills in the gap. On page 16 it is reported in a School Notes column that "Larrie Henry Schmidt, son of Reuben Schmidt, was re-elected news editor of the Hurricane, University of Miami weekly student newspaper. He is a sophomore journalism major at UM's College of Arts and Sciences."

I have no idea why he would have left out telling the FBI about his Miami days, but I do wonder what the Hurricane was saying about Castro, and what friendships he may have made in Miami.

Interesting information. Could it be that Schmidt was working as a FBI agent at the University of Miami? It is also strange that he should leave the job as editor of the Culver City Citizen to rejoin the army. He of course served under General Walker in Germany. After leaving the army in October, 1962, he moves to Dallas. Schmidt's brother then becomes Walker's chauffeur and general aide.

Schmidt invited Bernard Weissman to Dallas. Weissman later told the Warren Commission that Schmidt argued: "If we are going to take advantage of the situation, or if you are," meaning me, "you better hurry down here and take advantage of the publicity, and at least become known among these various right-wingers, because this is the chance we have been looking for to infiltrate some of these organizations and become known," in other words, go along with the philosophy we had developed in Munich."

Weissman arrived in Dallas on 4th November, 1963. Soon afterwards Schmidt got Weissman to join the Young Americans for Freedom. Schmidt also introduced Weissman to Joe Grinnan of the John Birch Society. Grinnan was involved in organizing protests against the visit of JFK. Grinnan seemed to know about the visit before it was officially announced to the public. Grinnan suggested that they should place a black-bordered advert in the Dallas Morning News on 22nd November, 1963. The advert cost $1,465. Grinnan supplied the money. He claimed that some of this came from Nelson Bunker Hunt, the son of Haroldson L. Hunt. Weissman was given the task of signing the advert and taking it to the newspaper office.

Do you know what job Schmidt did in Dallas? If his brother was Walker's general aide, what did Larrie do?

Have you got the date of this interview with the FBI? I thought the Warren Report said the FBI could not find Schmidt after the assassination (along with Weissman he fled from Dallas).

Sorry John... should have searched for this thread before posting.

Schmidt was interviewed by the FBI in Dallas on the 5th of Dec, '63. He worked as an insurance salesman for Mutual of New York through the office at 2595 Turtle Creek. Walker lived at 4011. 3505 Turtle Creek was somehow associated with Sam Bloom, advertising guru, a power in the Dallas Citizen's Council, and major force behind the building of the Dallas Trade Mart. Found in Ruby's apartment were some "Vote the Conservative Democratic Slate" cards - written on the back of one card was:

"Sam Bloom - turtle

3505 Turtle Creek

Luke RI 7-6965

Times Herald

Weissman denied they served directly under Walker in Germany.

Mr. JENNER. Who was the overall commander in Germany at that time?

Mr. WEISSMAN. The overall commander?

Mr. JENNER. Was General Walker one of the commanders at that time?

Mr. WEISSMAN. No; he had been removed at that time. In any case, he would have been about 60 or 70 miles--he was based in Landshut, Germany.

Weissman did leave Dallas on the Wednesday following the assassination, and I believe Schmidt did go into hiding for a while, but within Dallas.

Yes, I think it's possible he was working for the FBI in Miami - though nil evidence I know of to support it.

Weissman and Burley were employed on a strictly commission basis with the Carpet Engineers at 1002 South Beckley. By his own admission, neither he nor Burley sold any carpet during this employment. Asked how they survived, he claimed they lived of $200 in savings, and a credit card supplied by Schmidt.

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