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Martin Blank

Albarelli's "A Secret Order"

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Guest Robert Morrow

Anyone know why this keeps getting pushed back? it's the third time it's been delayed i believe.

I don't know. It is very common for authors to keep adding stuff, editing stuff, etc.

Here is the link to buy H.P. Albarelli's "A Secret Order: Investigating the High Strangeness and Synchronicity in the JFK Assassination:"

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Order-Investigating-Synchronicity-Assassination/dp/1936296551/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1334517481&sr=8-1

He also wrote "A Terrible Mistake: The Murder of Frank Olson and the CIA's Secret Cold War Experiments"

http://www.amazon.com/Terrible-Mistake-Murder-Secret-Experiments/dp/0977795373/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1334517481&sr=8-2

"A Terrible Mistake" is an awesome book with 14 "five stars" at Amazon and no ratings. Just solid gold.

Here is an Amazon review by Jeffrey Kaye of the first book:

"H.P. Albarelli, Jr. has written a fully detailed, compelling account of the murder of CIA-linked 1950s Army biochemist Frank Olson. The somewhat surprising death of an otherwise little-known Midwestern scientist would become for contemporary historians, journalists, and researchers -- years after the event -- a crucial nexus providing a gathering point for the multitudinous strands connecting a welter of secretive Cold War intelligence and military programs.

The Olson case burst upon the public's consciousness in the mid-1970s, along with other revelations at the time concerning CIA and military domestic spying and medical experimentation upon unwitting victims, thanks in part to a landmark expose by then-New York Times reporter Seymour Hersh. Pursued by Olson's family, attorneys, government commissions, newspaper reporters, and even some CIA agents, the truth behind Olson's death after a hundred-foot fall from a Manhattan hotel window on November 28, 1953, has been obscured over the years by a combination of myth, government misdirection, amateurish or hack "research," and, crucially, a lack of access to essential documentation. Now, after almost a decade of research, writer and researcher Albarelli has produced his magnum opus on Olson's death, and it has been well worth the wait.

"A Terrible Mistake" is part history book, part biography, part memoir, and part mystery tale. In order to understand the story of Frank Olson's life and death, and the cover-up surrounding that death, Mr. Albarelli must take the reader on a journey into the history of Cold War experimentation on mind and behavioral control, implemented by a welter of CIA and military programs whose names have passed into the iconic nomenclature regarding the underworld of American covert activities: Project Bluebird, Project MKULTRA, Project Artichoke, MKNAOMI, and others. In addition, because Olson was a government scientist with top secret clearance working on biological weaponry programs for the Special Operations Division at Fort Detrick, the book also offers a peek into this very little reported corner of U.S. history.

The book is quite long, yet remains a page-turner. I won't reveal the mystery Albarelli solves, i.e., who killed Frank Olson and why, but the long build-up describing the various covert operations of the intelligence agencies, well-documented in the book, builds to a startling pay-off.

In the first half of the book, the author describes Olson's life, the government programs that touch upon his work, Olson's death and its aftermath. The latter part of the book picks up from the initial public revelations surrounding his death, coming over 20 years after it occurred, and the following investigations, including the reopening of the murder investigation by the New York City's District Attorney's office in 1996. Throughout, we are entertained by a kaleidoscopic sequence of characters, including former CIA chiefs Allen Dulles and William Colby, CIA psychiatrists, Watergate burglars (for instance, we learn James McCord was the CIA agent initially sent out to deal with Olson's death), former CIA agents, hotel managers, hired assassins, mobsters, high-priced attorneys, dubious informants, U.S. diplomats and generals, politicians (including a mid-1970s appearance by both Don Rumsfeld and Richard Cheney), and many, many more.

This is not just a book about a dusty, decades-old murder case. With the news of the past few years around U.S. use of torture, as well as recent revelations by Nobel Prize-winning Physicians for Human Rights surrounding possible torture experimentation upon detainees held by the CIA, the history of similar activities by the same United States agencies, as narrated in Albarelli's book, has direct significance to crucial news events of our own day.

I strongly recommend this book. The author's honesty and willingness to look at the facts, rather than wishful thinking, or rely upon accepted wisdom, makes this investigatory journey well-worth the reader's time. The book has a fully-documented "Notes" section, which will satisfy the most avid researcher, or those who wish to double-check the author's assertions. Also included is a section with photographs of key documents.

It seems certain that "A Terrible Mistake" will take its place along other classics of its historical genre. But it is also the most fascinating and entertaining book you will purchase for a long time."

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Albarelli's book is scheduled to be released in a week or two, according to Amazon: http://www.amazon.co...2&pf_rd_i=typ01

Hopefully it happens this time.

Other TrineDay books in the works include Baker's book on David Ferrie, Scott Kaiser's book on his father, Todd Elliot's book on Rose Cherami,

Robert "Tosh" Plumlee's Deep Cover, Shallow Graves, and an update of Vince Palamara's Survivor's Guilt.

http://trineday.com/

Kris Millegan deserves credit for not shying away from controversial topics.

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Guest Robert Morrow

Albarelli's book is scheduled to be released in a week or two, according to Amazon: http://www.amazon.co...2&pf_rd_i=typ01

Hopefully it happens this time.

Other TrineDay books in the works include Baker's book on David Ferrie, Scott Kaiser's book on his father, Todd Elliot's book on Rose Cherami,

Robert "Tosh" Plumlee's Deep Cover, Shallow Graves, and an update of Vince Palamara's Survivor's Guilt.

http://trineday.com/

Kris Millegan deserves credit for not shying away from controversial topics.

A good one is going to be "Confessions of a D.C. Madame: the Politics of Sex, Lies, and Blackmail" by Henry Vinson.

Henry Vinson was the #1 gay pimp ("madame") for Washington, DC in the 1980's. Let's just say he knows a LOT of stuff about a LOT of people,

http://www.trineday.com/images/upcoming/DC_Madame_coverSample-big.jpg

In fact, I would call this a must-buy book.

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The Trine Day site - www.trineday.com - lists all their upcoming books, JFK and otherwise, on the right side of the page. The cover image is pretty small, but the only 'Baker' that I can see listed on the cover of the Ferrie book doesn't seem to be a guy...

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If anyone has the book en route, be aware that a printing error has affected one page of the text, between pages 419 and 420. (A picture appears between those pages but a brief portion of the text has been skipped). Kris Millegan advises that future printings will be corrected. The complete section of missing text is below:

.............

Following Buick's trial, during which he was found guilty, Robert Buick wrote a series of additional letters to the U.S. Attorney. After receiving a telephone call from Buick, and after consulting with Buick's attorney, Assistant U.S. Attorney Richard M. Coleman agreed to meet with Buick. Reads an FBI report: "Coleman had received information that Buick, in a letter to his wife, made reference to the `news from New Orleans' saying `it adds perfectly well' with what he has."

Coleman and a U.S. Secret Service agent met with Buick on March 23, 1967, but Coleman stated at the start of the meeting that he was only there to "discuss matters pertaining to [buick's] trial." The FBI report states, "Attorney Coleman refused stating they were present to discuss information Buick claimed to have concerning the assassination." Again, Buick refused to discuss his trial if the assassination could not also be included in any discussion. The meeting ended on this note.

On March 24, 1967, Buick telephoned Coleman to tell him that he was "writing to the President of the United States with copies for the Attorney General, the Director of the FBI, and others. Buick asked Coleman if the jail where he was being held would censor the letters. Coleman told Buick "that the FBI had no control over jail regulations."

An FBI report written about Buick's problems with Coleman reads: "Review of psychiatric reports on Buick disclose that Buick in these interviews also indicated he had information concerning the assassination. One psychiatrist reported "this defendant is playing a very skillful game of trying to convey the impression that he has valuable information but is unable to divulge it except to such people as the Chief Justice of the United States. He has the typical effrontery of the sociopath."

A February 2, 1972 FBI report provides more details about Robert Buick's ongoing case. The report reveals that on February 1, 1972 a man named August Ricard von Kleist, who lived in New Mexico, contacted the FBI and advised the Bureau that he had "certain information concerning a plot to assassinate President John Fitzgerald Kennedy. According to von Kleist, this information came to his attention from Robert Clayton Buick, a convicted bank robber on whom he was preparing a story for publication in True magazine; however, this story was not accepted by True magazine and remains unpublished to date. The story about Buick is not connected with the alleged assassination plot, but rather reports he was a bullfighter in Mexico at the same time he was robbing banks in California." (Von Kliest was most likely unaware that True magazine maintained a very close relationship with both the FBI and CIA through its editor and several of its top feature writers.)

................

H.P. Albarelli Jr. notes that Pt. 2 of the book is in preparation, and a couple of chapters from that forthcoming volume may appear in the near future on Russ Baker's site.

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Mike:

Who is Baker that is writing a book on Ferrie?

Also, a publisher, not Trine Day, wanted me to do a book on Rose Cheramie.

I declined. I said, look to do a book about her today would take a very large advance and then expenses. Because you would have to do a lot of on the ground research, knocking on doors, and getting leads to family members etc. And I knew this publisher would not come up with the money since they were a smaller house, a university press.

Trine Day doesn't have that kind of money either. So I will be interested to see what this guy comes up with.

Jim...the "Baker" is JVB:

http://www.amazon.com/David-Ferrie-Participant-Anti-Castro-Assassination/dp/1937584542/ref=sr_sp-atf_title_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1368176672&sr=1-2-fkmr0&keywords=jdtyh+vary+baker

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"Holy Fetzerooni batman".

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Forum member Steve Rosen collaborated on the Rose Cherami chapter and Steve Duffy collaborated on the Adele Edisen chapter.

Readers will notice a substantial number of EF members mentioned in the Acknowledgements section.

Hank Albarelli thanks Steven Rosen for especially insightful feedback and information and describes Steven Duffy as a rock among a sea of pebbles.

I always knew those guys were good.

I read the last chapter first, which is a lengthy study of the Viola June Cobb story.

Albarelli is planning a second volume.

I look forward to reading A Secret Order and I think most EF members would probably enjoy it.

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I bought this as an E book, but quickly found it was poorly written and full of undocumented innuendo. I've had three best selling books on ammunition published so my comments on this book are not without foundation.

Destiny Betrayed is a much better book

Edited by Evan Marshall

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Hi jim i think judith baker of suppsed oswald lover fame is writing the rose cheramie book ...i believe that ms baker is just a very good writer if you get my drift.

Mike:

Who is Baker that is writing a book on Ferrie?

Also, a publisher, not Trine Day, wanted me to do a book on Rose Cheramie.

I declined. I said, look to do a book about her today would take a very large advance and then expenses. Because you would have to do a lot of on the ground research, knocking on doors, and getting leads to family members etc. And I knew this publisher would not come up with the money since they were a smaller house, a university press.

Trine Day doesn't have that kind of money either. So I will be interested to see what this guy comes up with.

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I just finished reading "A Secret Order", which I had difficulty putting down until I finished it from cover to cover. A masterful work full of revelations by a skilled writer at the top of his trade.

Excerpt from recently published “A Secret Order: Investigating the High Strangeness and Synchronicity in the JFK Assassination” by H.P. Albarelli, Jr.:

The author, who is not easily given to wild speculation or conspiracy theories, did not originally intend to offer the above chain of intriguing coincidences and high strangeness in an effort to induce readers to believe that Lee Harvey Oswald may have been the unwitting subject of some devious government sponsored mind-control scheme that eventually placed him on a path toward the murder of President John F. Kennedy. That, in my view would have been irresponsible and outlandish, but when most of these odd connections between young Oswald and the CIA’s MK/ULTRA programs were first detected I was unaware that the CIA and U.S. Army had funded and engaged in substantial behavioral modifications involving children.

…While there remains little direct evidence that Oswald was some sort of programmed assassin or covert operative there certainly are enough circumstantial facts that nudge this possibility into areas for serious consideration.

Was there time in New York City to perform such scientific manipulation on Oswald? Without question there was. Lee Harvey Oswald was reportedly absent from school for at least 50 days while in New York City. Surely, he did not spend all these unaccounted for days at the Bronx zoo or riding the subway.

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I'm about halfway through the volume and am enjoying it, particularly the long central chapter on David Morales. The early parts of the book (linking Oswald's documented activities with similar timelines involving various MK-Ultra personnel) is a little overwhelming and I'll probably have to re-read it to pick up some of the names and implications. Even if I buy only half of what Albarelli is suggesting regarding Oswald as a focus of MK-Ultra experimentation (and much of it is left ambiguous) it would have been a clever move by Angleton to pick a patsy with a background that covered so much covert intelligence activity, giving all and sundry good cause to keep things covered up. I look forward to thoughts from others here as they read it - Forum head honcho John Simkin is quoted approvingly within the book as a historian.

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