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Ruby and his dogs


John Geraghty
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Just found this in the Warren Commission, now you cannot say Jack Ruby wasnt a nice guy.

Affection for Dogs

Ruby was extremely fond of dogs. Numerous persons stated that he was constantly accompanied by several of the dogs he owned.450 Testimony at Ruby's trial in March 1964 indicated that he referred to his dogs as his "children." 451 He also became extremely incensed when he witnessed the maltreatment of any of his dogs.

appendix 16 biography of Jack Ruby

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An interesting question is why Ruby took his favorite dog Sheba (his "wife") with him, and left her in the car (unlocked), when he went and shot Oswald. My hunch is that Ruby was told to do so to reinforce the idea that the killing was not planned but done spontaneously after happening onto the scene.

Here's an article I wrote on this subject:

http://hobrad.angelfire.com/rubysdog.html

 

 

 

Edited by Ron Ecker
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My experience of life has suggests that you should never trust someone who appears to love dogs more than people.

I suppose I shouldn't be trusted. :]

On another note, I heard that LBJ abused animals. Not sure if it's true, though, as I've only read a few books on him.

Now, come on, it's one thing to accuse Lyndon of conspring to kill JFK, but to call him an abuser of dogs on top of it! (There is a famous photo of him picking up his beagle (I think it was) by the dog's ears.)

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An interesting question is why Ruby took his favorite dog Sheba (his "wife") with him, and left her in the car (unlocked), when he went and shot Oswald. My hunch is that Ruby was told to do so to reinforce the idea that the killing was not planned but done spontaneously after happening onto the scene.

Here's an article I wrote on this subject:

http://www.hobrad.com/acrejack.htm

Ron,

Read your article. A few notes.

Was it unusual for Ruby to keep large sums of money in his trunk? Not according to George Senator.

Mr. SENATOR. The only thing I can say is that I would have to guess on my own and say I can only surmise that he wouldn't have had any cash with him. That is what I would guess. I don't know. First of all, he carries money both ways, see. Now Jack has always been under the impression wherever he goes, daytime or nighttime, that money, I don't say all his money but a certain part of money, what ever he puts in, is safe in the trunk. He feels it is safe in the trunk.

Karen Carlin gave the following tesimony indicating Ruby was going downtown, regardless of her alleged need of $25.00.

Mrs. CARLIN. Yes. He said, "It will take me about 20 or 30 minutes to get dressed, and then I will go on down." And something that he had to do with the dogs' freedom, I think.

It seems very relevant to the whole Sheba question that the WC recorded her as indicating more that one dog i.e "dogs'" instead of "dog's". Exactly what this means is hardly clear, except that it had to do with all of his dogs - not just Sheba.

I believe Sheba was at the club, with the other dogs soon to be "freed" - not in his car.

The cop who went to retrieve the car was Vernon Smart. In his testimony, he gives as the only reason told to him by Stephenson to go to the car was to retrieve a sum of money.

Mr. GRIFFIN. How long did you remain up there on the third floor before you were asked to do something in connection with Ruby's car?

Mr. SMART. I couldn't say for sure. It was some time, though, elapsed, quite some time elapsed, and Chief Stevenson would call me on the phone and gave me the license number of his car and told me where it was parked, asked me--told me there was a sum of money in it, to go over and remove it.

Stephenson had testified that someone (name unrecalled, naturally) had contacted him and told him where Ruby's car was parked, and that there was a dog in it. But as you can see above, Smart doesn't mention that as part of Stephenson's orders.

It takes a leading question later from Griffin to get that information:

Mr. GRIFFIN. Was there a dog in that car?

Mr. SMART. Yes, sir.

So Stephenson told him about the pooch, but wait... no he didn't... "I just happened to find one in there, now that you mention it, Mr Griffin, sir." Give me a break!

There is also this from Smart's testimony:

Mr. GRIFFIN. You got out there, and I take it from your statement that you found that somebody else had already been to the car?

Mr. SMART. No, sir.

Mr. GRIFFIN. You were the first one to the car?

Mr. SMART. I don't think I said that anyone else had been to it.

Mr. GRIFFIN. I will correct the record, because his statement doesn't reflect it, what I said. All right. When you got to the car, was the car locked or unlocked?

I wonder if anyone in this whole case managed to get their first utterances correct. This is supposedly another example. Smart's statement did say someone else had been to it. Now -- before that WC, he denies that anyone had. Maybe, just maybe, someone slipped Sheba INTO the car?

Now back to Senator for a second... immediately after Senator gave the testimony shown above, Our Man Griffin suddenly wades in with this:

Mr. GRIFFIN. Let's suppose Jack Ruby had done this. Let's suppose he had taken his dog Sheba to the Carousel Club, left a note for somebody as to how to take care of Sheba, and had taken all the money out of the back of his car and locked it in the safe at the Carousel Club.

Let's suppose, indeed! Did Griffin have doubts about Sheba being in the car?

And what about Armstrong? He told the WC that asked him from jail to find his dog, and Armstrong dutifully sent Joy Dale to pick it up at the pound. Joy Dale however, denies she did this. In that event, one should probably rely more upon Armstrong's account to the HSCA. He told them that he couldn't recall whether he picked the dog up from the police or from the Carousel hinting it was probably the latter, since he didn't drive, and he could not recall anyone giving him a lift to police HQ.

In your article you also say Karen Claimed to need the money for rent and groceries. THat was indeed her calim to the WC -- AFTER the FBI had interviewed their landlord and found out that the rent was not due (She had only mentioned rent to the FBI). Bruce went even further, claiming the money was for groceries and "medicine" which they both needed, at the same time, claiming to be embarrassed about the FBI questioning the landlord.

They were caught in a lie, and tried to cover it with another.

You also mention her disappareance. An interesting doc in the DPD files on that -- the missing persons report filed by her grandmother.

Grandma let the cat right out the bag where money and Karen were concerned, saying she usually carried large amounts. Not surprising really, since other DPD files show she and Bruce were running a brothel from their apartment.

Here's the missing persons report:

missing persons report

If Sheba was in the car, it would support my belief that Ruby was brainwashed, given he would not have been aware that he was not coming back.

Based on the above, I think there is room for doubt that she was in the car, though. At least when Ruby parked it. There is nothing to indicate that he showed any concern about the dog's welfare after his arrest -- odd considering this was his "wife" :)

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Greg Parker: Grandma let the cat right out the bag where money and Karen were concerned, saying she usually carried large amounts. Not surprising really, since other DPD files show she and Bruce were running a brothel from their apartment.

Here's the missing persons report:

missing persons report

Funny that Grandma waited almost 3 weeks to file a missing persons report. From January 11th when she expected her grand daughter back, to February 2nd.

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Greg Parker: Grandma let the cat right out the bag where money and Karen were concerned, saying she usually carried large amounts. Not surprising really, since other DPD files show she and Bruce were running a brothel from their apartment.

Here's the missing persons report:

missing persons report

Funny that Grandma waited almost 3 weeks to file a missing persons report. From January 11th when she expected her grand daughter back, to February 2nd.

These are valuable comments. Thank you. For the record, I observed Jack Ruby with a roll of bills of twenty and fifty dollars, a roll so thick it made a bulge in his hip pocket. He said he did everything on a cash basis.

As for the comments about dogs, I was told that the two daschhunds were never parted and that the "husband -wife"team was the two dogs. The "wifew"was never separated from the husband, so far as I am aware. They were matched and paired and were in distress without each other. If Sheba had been alone in that car, everybody would have known it because she would have howled. There was a great deal of discussion of his dogs because I had a dog named Sparky. I still have a short story written as a little girl about my dog Sparky, a dog who couldn;t control himself. This made a merry joke as Jack Ruby was known as "Spparky."In fact, I did not know hm by a name other than "Sparky"as he was introduced to me this way, due to the dog story I had told.

I do not believe Sheba would have gone alone ANYWHERE without her husband. And her husband wasn't Jack Ruby--it was the male dog. Jack Ruby would never have left Sheba alone in an unlocked car because she could have been taken. And would have screamed her head off in the interim. BOTH dogs would have been in that vehicle, or none at all. Period.

Best regards,

Judyth Vary Baker

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Judyth,

As for the comments about dogs, I was told that the two daschhunds were never parted and that the "husband -wife"team was the two dogs. The "wifew"was never separated from the husband, so far as I am aware. They were matched and paired and were in distress without each other.

As of November 22nd, did Ruby only own two dogs?

If what you say is true, it makes the story of shipping a dog to Alex Gruber all the more suspicious.

Steve Thomas

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Greg, I'll try to address the questions raised by you and others here.

Carlin testified that when she called Ruby, he said "something about the dog," which would mean Sheba, whom Ruby usually kept with him. When Carlin later refers to "something he had to do with the dogs' freedom, I think," she would be referring to the dogs that was kept in a back room of the club. So I see no inconsistency in her testimony with regard to Ruby's dogs.

Senator testified that Sheba had 6 puppies at one time. These were "the children" who were kept at the club. Ruby had as many as 9 or 10 dogs, but Senator indicated that Ruby gave some away, and Armstrong testified that at the time Ruby killed Oswald, only the male dog Clipper and another dog were at the club. Counting Sheba, that would mean that Ruby was down to only three dogs at that time.

Ruby calling Sheba his "wife" was also discussed in Senator's testimony, and at Ruby's trial Rabbi Silverman testified that Ruby once began crying and told him, "I'm unmarried, I have no children, this is my wife" - and he pointed to one of the dogs - "and these are my children."

I see no reason not to believe that Ruby took Sheba with him when he went to kill Oswald. Why Ruby did it is the question, but Senator testified that when Ruby left that morning he said, "George, I am taking the dog down to the club." Detective Smart told the FBI on 11/25/63 that Asst Chief Stevenson told him to go and search Ruby's car, get the money out of it, put the car in the pound, and "take a dog from the car and have it placed in an animal shelter." Smart said that Ruby must have told Captain Fritz where the car was.

Stevenson testified that he couldn't recall who told him about the car, but that someone advised him that Ruby "had a dog in the car." When Griffin asked Smart, "Was there a dog in that car?", I therefore don't see it as a leading question. Smart had already told the FBI there was a dog in the car, and Stevenson testified about a dog being there.

I don't see anywhere in Smart's statement where he said that someone had already been to the car. He corrects the WC's Griffin on that point. Griffin was apparently thinking of the testimony of Detective McMillon, who said that he was instructed to take keys that were taken from Ruby's pockets and see if he could get into Ruby's car. McMillon went to the lot and couldn't find the car, because Smart had already been there and had it impounded. So it was McMillon, not Smart, who stated that someone had already been to the car.

On Griffin saying to Senator let’s suppose that Ruby took Sheba to the Carousel, left all the money in the safe there, etc., I think Griffin was simply trying to get at the question of how Ruby handled his money, i.e. is that something he would have done, and was not expressing doubt that Sheba was in the car.

Only Armstrong’s testimony puzzles me. He told the WC that Joy Dale went to the pound and got Sheba and brought her to the club. He later tells the HSCA that he himself went and got Sheba. (Greg, you say that Joy Dale denied getting Sheba. What is the source for that? I can’t find any testimony or statement by Joy Dale or by her real name Joyce McDonald.)

When Armstrong says he couldn’t remember if he went to the police station or to the Carousel to get Sheba, he must have meant the animal shelter when he said Carousel. It wouldn’t make any sense to say Carousel, since if Sheba was at the Carousel he wouldn’t have to go get her. That’s where Armstrong worked and fed the dogs. But the HSCA’s Purdy was no help here with his questioning, abruptly changing the subject to something else.

Ron

Edited by Ron Ecker
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Greg, I'll try to address the questions raised by you and others here.

Carlin testified that when she called Ruby, he said "something about the dog," which would mean Sheba, whom Ruby usually kept with him. When Carlin later refers to "something he had to do with the dogs' freedom, I think," she would be referring to the dogs that was kept in a back room of the club. So I see no inconsistency in her testimony with regard to Ruby's dogs.

Senator testified that Sheba had 6 puppies at one time. These were "the children" who were kept at the club. Ruby had as many as 9 or 10 dogs, but Senator indicated that Ruby gave some away, and Armstrong testified that at the time Ruby killed Oswald, only the male dog Clipper and another dog were at the club. Counting Sheba, that would mean that Ruby was down to only three dogs at that time.

Ruby calling Sheba his "wife" was also discussed in Senator's testimony, and at Ruby's trial Rabbi Silverman testified that Ruby once began crying and told him, "I'm unmarried, I have no children, this is my wife" - and he pointed to one of the dogs - "and these are my children."

I see no reason not to believe that Ruby took Sheba with him when he went to kill Oswald. Why Ruby did it is the question, but Senator testified that when Ruby left that morning he said, "George, I am taking the dog down to the club." Detective Smart told the FBI on 11/25/63 that Asst Chief Stevenson told him to go and search Ruby's car, get the money out of it, put the car in the pound, and "take a dog from the car and have it placed in an animal shelter." Smart said that Ruby must have told Captain Fritz where the car was.

Stevenson testified that he couldn't recall who told him about the car, but that someone advised him that Ruby "had a dog in the car." When Griffin asked Smart, "Was there a dog in that car?", I therefore don't see it as a leading question. Smart had already told the FBI there was a dog in the car, and Stevenson testified about a dog being there.

I don't see anywhere in Smart's statement where he said that someone had already been to the car. He corrects the WC's Griffin on that point. Griffin was apparently thinking of the testimony of Detective McMillon, who said that he was instructed to take keys that were taken from Ruby's pockets and see if he could get into Ruby's car. McMillon went to the lot and couldn't find the car, because Smart had already been there and had it impounded. So it was McMillon, not Smart, who stated that someone had already been to the car.

On Griffin saying to Senator let’s suppose that Ruby took Sheba to the Carousel, left all the money in the safe there, etc., I think Griffin was simply trying to get at the question of how Ruby handled his money, i.e. is that something he would have done, and was not expressing doubt that Sheba was in the car. 

Only Armstrong’s testimony puzzles me. He told the WC that Joy Dale went to the pound and got Sheba and brought her to the club. He later tells the HSCA that he himself went and got Sheba. (Greg, you say that Joy Dale denied getting Sheba. What is the source for that? I can’t find any testimony or statement by Joy Dale or by her real name Joyce McDonald.) 

When Armstrong says he couldn’t remember if he went to the police station or to the Carousel to get Sheba, he must have meant the animal shelter when he said Carousel. It wouldn’t make any sense to say Carousel, since if Sheba was at the Carousel he wouldn’t have to go get her. That’s where Armstrong worked and fed the dogs. But the HSCA’s Purdy was no help here with his questioning, abruptly changing the subject to something else.

Ron

Well, Ron, I agree with your statements. They all make sense except one. It seems odd that Armstrong couldn´t "remember" the verbal difference between Carousel and animal shelter. A trip to an animal shelter would be unforgettable. Have you ever been to one? It´s an unforgettable experience.

I am sorry I can´t pursue this thread as I have already offered the little I knew in the matter.

Hope the truth can be worked out here. Seems to me that the truth does not reside in that statement about where the dog was picked up. Just my humble opinion.

Best Regards,

judyth Vary Baker

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Greg, I'll try to address the questions raised by you and others here.

Carlin testified that when she called Ruby, he said "something about the dog," which would mean Sheba, whom Ruby usually kept with him. When Carlin later refers to "something he had to do with the dogs' freedom, I think," she would be referring to the dogs that was kept in a back room of the club. So I see no inconsistency in her testimony with regard to Ruby's dogs.

Ron, that may be one interpretation. However, it's not one I can agree with. I think she merely corrected the earlier remark with the latter one. Her lawyer, Mr Jackson, sought clarification:

Mrs. CARLIN. Yes. He said, "It will take me about 20 or 30 minutes to get dressed, and then I will go on down." And something that he had to do with the dogs' freedom, I think.

Mr. JACKSON. About the dogs?

Mrs. CARLIN. Yes. He had some dogs. Kept them in the club.

Senator testified that Sheba had 6 puppies at one time. These were "the children" who were kept at the club. Ruby had as many as 9 or 10 dogs, but Senator indicated that Ruby gave some away, and Armstrong testified that at the time Ruby killed Oswald, only the male dog Clipper and another dog were at the club. Counting Sheba, that would mean that Ruby was down to only three dogs at that time.

That's true.

Ruby calling Sheba his "wife" was also discussed in Senator's testimony, and at Ruby's trial Rabbi Silverman testified that Ruby once began crying and told him, "I'm unmarried, I have no children, this is my wife" - and he pointed to one of the dogs - "and these are my children."

Haven't read the trial transcripts, unfortunately.

I see no reason not to believe that Ruby took Sheba with him when he went to kill Oswald. Why Ruby did it is the question, but Senator testified that when Ruby left that morning he said, "George, I am taking the dog down to the club." Detective Smart told the FBI on 11/25/63 that Asst Chief Stevenson told him to go and search Ruby's car, get the money out of it, put the car in the pound, and "take a dog from the car and have it placed in an animal shelter." Smart said that Ruby must have told Captain Fritz where the car was.

Did Fritz ever mention that being the case?

I don't rule out the possibility that he did have Sheba. I just think there is room for doubt. Another questions that concerns me is, do we know how long Sheba was supposed to be in the car?

Here's what can, and does happen:

"Never leave your pet unattended in a parked car for any period of time. On a warm day, the temperature in a parked car can reach 120°F in a matter of minutes—even with the car windows partially open. Your pet can quickly suffer brain damage or die from heatstroke or suffocation when trapped in high temperatures."

http://www.petloveshack.com/Weather.html

In fact, according to the World Kennel Club, being locked in a car is the leading cause of heartstroke in dogs. I can't imagine Ruby subjecting Sheba to that, even if it was to help set up an appearance that there was no premeditation in shooting Oswald. If it was indeed what he did, then brainwashing at least explains it.

Stevenson testified that he couldn't recall who told him about the car, but that someone advised him that Ruby "had a dog in the car." When Griffin asked Smart, "Was there a dog in that car?", I therefore don't see it as a leading question. Smart had already told the FBI there was a dog in the car, and Stevenson testified about a dog being there.

Fair enough. That does seem to be what he said on the 25th of Nov.

I don't see anywhere in Smart's statement where he said that someone had already been to the car. He corrects the WC's Griffin on that point. Griffin was apparently thinking of the testimony of Detective McMillon, who said that he was instructed to take keys that were taken from Ruby's pockets and see if he could get into Ruby's car. McMillon went to the lot and couldn't find the car, because Smart had already been there and had it impounded. So it was McMillon, not Smart, who stated that someone had already been to the car.

Yet you say in your online article that Ruby had locked his keys in the trunk...????

And McMillon's testimony only adds to the confusion. He claims he was instructed to take the keys and meet Smart so Smart could get into the car and impound it. Smart on the other hand, seemed oblivious to having to meet anyone with the keys and said in testimony that he assumed the car would be unlocked. McMillon also mentions that Ruby had told them about the dog... then goes onto explain why he never did make a note of that. hmmmm...

On Griffin saying to Senator let’s suppose that Ruby took Sheba to the Carousel, left all the money in the safe there, etc., I think Griffin was simply trying to get at the question of how Ruby handled his money, i.e. is that something he would have done, and was not expressing doubt that Sheba was in the car. 

Okay. I can run with that one.

Only Armstrong’s testimony puzzles me. He told the WC that Joy Dale went to the pound and got Sheba and brought her to the club. He later tells the HSCA that he himself went and got Sheba. (Greg, you say that Joy Dale denied getting Sheba. What is the source for that? I can’t find any testimony or statement by Joy Dale or by her real name Joyce McDonald.) 

She made that denial to Gary Mack.

When Armstrong says he couldn’t remember if he went to the police station or to the Carousel to get Sheba, he must have meant the animal shelter when he said Carousel. It wouldn’t make any sense to say Carousel, since if Sheba was at the Carousel he wouldn’t have to go get her. That’s where Armstrong worked and fed the dogs. But the HSCA’s Purdy was no help here with his questioning, abruptly changing the subject to something else.

I agree with Judyth here. I don't find it plausible that Armstrong would confuse the Carousel with an animal shelter (some of the patrons may have, though :blink: )

On the other hand. your objection is a good one. I can only assume that Ruby had a reason for not wanting Sheba left there... perhaps without him being able to be on Arstrong's case every day to feed her etc, he felt she'd be better looked after elsewhere?

Ron

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I don't rule out the possibility that he did have Sheba. I just think there is room for doubt. Another questions that concerns me is, do we know how long Sheba was supposed to be in the car?

Here's what can, and does happen:

"Never leave your pet unattended in a parked car for any period of time. On a warm day, the temperature in a parked car can reach 120°F in a matter of minutes—even with the car windows partially open. Your pet can quickly suffer brain damage or die from heatstroke or suffocation when trapped in high temperatures."

http://www.petloveshack.com/Weather.html

This is certainly a legitimate question. I wonder, though, how much of a "warm day" it was, considering it was before noon in late November. Perhaps it was cool enough that Ruby felt he could leave Sheba in the car for the time it would take to wire some money and go shoot somebody.

One would think, though, that by the time Detective Smart was sent to check out the car, it would have gotten quite warm inside, at least if the sun was out. Yet Sheba was obviously showing no sign of stress or agitation, since Smart initially didn't even notice the dog. Sheba, oddly, had crawled under some newspapers on the front seat (what, to get warm?), and Smart didn't realize she was there till he went to start the car and put his hand down on the papers, at which point Sheba rose up. I must say this is a strange part of the story.

In fact, according to the World Kennel Club, being locked in a car is the leading cause of heartstroke in dogs. I can't imagine Ruby subjecting Sheba to that, even if it was to help set up an appearance that there was no premeditation in shooting Oswald. If it was indeed what he did, then brainwashing at least explains it.

Are you suggesting that Ruby was brainwashed into shooting Oswald in the same way that Sirhan was programmed to shoot at RFK? If so, this would mean that Ruby shooting Oswald was part of the planned JFK conspiracy. I don't see how that could be, since it seems to me the arrest of Oswald was totally unexpected. And I don't think anyone had time to program Ruby between the JFK murder and the shooting of Oswald.

Yet you say in your online article that Ruby had locked his keys in the trunk...????

The taking of keys from Ruby's pockets is another oddity in the story. Obviously Ruby either had two sets of keys for some reason, or else the keys that were taken from the trunk by Smart were later given to McMillon (there being no keys from Ruby's pockets as claimed), to go check on Ruby's car which was no longer there. What kind of game could that be?

I don't find it plausible that Armstrong would confuse the Carousel with an animal shelter

I didn't mean that Armstrong would confuse the two physical places. I meant that "the Carousel" may have been a slip of the tongue when he meant to say animal shelter, because "the Carousel" simply doesn't make any sense in the context of the sentence.

That said, it also doesn't make much sense that Armstrong would tell the WC, only a few months after the event, that Joy Dale retrieved Sheba from the shelter, since Dale later had no memory of it and Armstrong told the HSCA, years after his WC testimony, that it was he who retrieved Sheba (i.e. his memory somehow improved over the years), but he couldn't remember if it was from the police station or the shelter. It certainly seems that Armstrong was being less than truthful on this subject, but I don't see why anyone would lie about who went and got Sheba. What difference did it make who went and got her?

Any further comments or theories would be appreciated. I may need to revise my article in some respects, or simply trash the whole thing.

Ron

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Ron Ecker Posted Today, 12:58 AM

  QUOTE(Greg Parker @ Dec 1 2004, 01:27 PM)

I don't rule out the possibility that he did have Sheba. I just think there is room for doubt. Another questions that concerns me is, do we know how long Sheba was supposed to be in the car?

Here's what can, and does happen:

"Never leave your pet unattended in a parked car for any period of time. On a warm day, the temperature in a parked car can reach 120°F in a matter of minutes—even with the car windows partially open. Your pet can quickly suffer brain damage or die from heatstroke or suffocation when trapped in high temperatures."

http://www.petloveshack.com/Weather.html

This is certainly a legitimate question. I wonder, though, how much of a "warm day" it was, considering it was before noon in late November. Perhaps it was cool enough that Ruby felt he could leave Sheba in the car for the time it would take to wire some money and go shoot somebody.

-----------------------------

Any further comments or theories would be appreciated. I may need to revise my article in some respects, or simply trash the whole thing.

Ron

Greg, Ron and others. It was a cool day when Oswald died. Do you remember the incident at the jail when detective Jim Leavelle went to pick up Oswald for the transfer?

The detectives offered Oswald a choice of two different sweaters, that his wife had brought him, because "it was a kind of a cool day". He contemplated on which sweater to wear, he chose the black one after all.

I don't have much else to offer on this Sheba deal, but I think the whole killing of Oswald smells just as fishy as the entire investigation in Dallas and the Warren Report.

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Antii,

Thanks for pointing out about the sweater.

Sometimes when you research these stories it seems like there's never an end. I just came across further testimony about a dog being in the car, this from parking lot attendant Theodore Jackson.

Jackson testified to the WC that Ruby's car was in the lot when he came to work about noon. What is odd about Jackson's testimony is his seeming uncertainty when first asked if there was a dog in the car. Thereafter he is quite conversant about a dog being there.

Why do people do this?

Mr. HUBERT. When you came up and saw this car did you put a ticket on it?

Mr. JACKSON. I put a ticket on it.

Mr. HUBERT. Were there any other cars parked in the lot?

Mr. JACKSON. Yes, sir; about, oh, I guess about six--about six more besides his, five or six more, I disremember.

Mr. HUBERT. Now, and you put a ticket on the car, did you notice whether the car was open, or closed?

Mr. JACKSON. No, sir; I didn't. I just looked at the car and the key was gone. The keys wasn't in the switch, and I just got a ticket, just stamped the ticket and put it on the windshield.

Mr. HUBERT. Was there a dog in the car?

Mr. JACKSON. Yes, sir; I think so. It was--yes, it was a dog in the car.

Mr. HUBERT. Was there any window open so that the dog could get some air?

Mr. JACKSON. I never looked whether there was or not.

Mr. HUBERT. Did that seem strange to you that there--somebody had a dog in the parked automobile?

Mr. JACKSON. Well, it did, two detectives came down, and they started searching the car, but they were looking for a key.

Mr. HUBERT. Were they able to open the door of the car?

Mr. JACKSON. I don't think the car was locked up, because they came down, well, they wasn't--it couldn't have been locked up, because they were looking for the key to the switch, because they wanted to take the car to the pound.

Mr. HUBERT. Before we get to that, how long after you got on duty and put the ticket on Mr. Ruby's car, did the detectives arrive?

Mr. JACKSON. Oh, about an hour or so, I guess. I believe about an hour or so.

Mr. HUBERT. Well, did they have any difficulty in opening the doors of the car?

Mr. JACKSON. I never even noticed them until they was out there to the car. I was listening to the radio about it.

Mr. HUBERT. What did you say with reference to the detectives, what they were doing?

Mr. JACKSON. They were searching--they searched the car.

Mr. HUBERT. The doors were open by the time you saw it?

Mr. JACKSON. They was searching the car.

Mr. HUBERT. Well, now, answer my question, were the doors open or do you remember?

Mr. JACKSON. When I seen them they were searching they must have been open.

Mr. HUBERT. When you say "searching," do you mean they were searching the back?

Mr. JACKSON. Looking for a key. They said they were looking for a key.

Mr. HUBERT. Key to what? The ignition?

Mr. JACKSON. The ignition key, and I think the trunk key, and they opened up the trunk and there was a bunch of sacks in the trunk. I don't know what was in them, and after they told me they was detectives, that was Jack Ruby's car, and I just took the ticket off the car and they were going--said they was going to take the car to the pound, and said something or another about calling somebody.

Mr. HUBERT. Doing what?

Mr. JACKSON. Said something or another about calling somebody, some of his relatives or something to see what they wanted to do with his dog. They were going to take the car to the pound.

Mr. HUBERT. Did they do anything with this dog, that you know of?

Mr. JACKSON. I don't know. They took the car to the pound.

Mr. HUBERT. What happened to the dog? Was it still in the car when they took it?

Mr. JACKSON. Yes; the dog was still in the car.

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