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7. Personal - Ruby, by an unknown author. Photocopy of the address of Sam Bloom , (Photocopy Poor Quality), date unknown. 00003006 1 page 15 02 007

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MF

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/marysdb/showRec.do?mode=searchResult&id=1210

Record:

BLOOM, SAM R.

Sources:

WC 17 (608, 610-1, 619, 621, 623, 626); WC 18 (716); WC 22 (516); WC 23 (530-624) J-C-S jobs Oswald worked on for Bloom); CD 362; CD 1403; HSCA Vol. XI (520-1); Moment of Madness, Gertz (271, 285-6, 309, 388); SMU Today, Winter 1970 (5); Dal-47); Dallas Times Herald, 2/16/72 (A-27)

Mary's

Comments:

Dallas advertising executive. Helped handle details of Motorcade. Ruby purchased $50.00 cashier's check, #16750, from Bank of Services & Trusts, to Sam Bloom, Trustee. Eva Grant thinks for "Charity." Date not given. Bloom was "Advisor" to Judge Joe B. Brown during Ruby's trial. Bloom was brother-in-law of Morty Freidman. They owned Dal-Tex Bldg.

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Again, remember Jim Marrs' remark in Crossfire, that Kennedy was killed by s Centrist coup, one that united groups of various political stripe that opposed him.

It is difficult to imagine that some of the authorities who facilitated the assassination and covered it up would be loyal to any one ideology, even if they were committed to the ending that occurred.

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Hi Mr.Kelly.I thought about this thread and Sid Walker when i read your Rendezvous At Dealey Plaza II topic,but my forum search turned up empty......Sam Bloom defies logic when you ask yourself,what are the odds??, that Oswald had worked on a Sam Bloom account,Bloom received a donation from Ruby, Bloom participated in the planning of the most infamous motorcade route in the history of America,Bloom was related to the owner of the DalTex building, and Bloom may have had the ear of Judge Joe Brown during Ruby's trial.....alot of coincidences involving Bloom.

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Hi Mr.Kelly.I thought about this thread and Sid Walker when i read your Rendezvous At Dealey Plaza II topic,but my forum search turned up empty......Sam Bloom defies logic when you ask yourself,what are the odds??, that Oswald had worked on a Sam Bloom account,Bloom received a donation from Ruby, Bloom participated in the planning of the most infamous motorcade route in the history of America,Bloom was related to the owner of the DalTex building, and Bloom may have had the ear of Judge Joe Brown during Ruby's trial.....alot of coincidences involving Bloom.

Thanks for paying attention Mark.

Bill Kelly

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Thanks to Gary Mack for some deep background on Sam Bloom and Son. -

http://www.tshaonlin...s/BB/fblvh.html

BLOOM, SAM R. (19041983). Sam R. Bloom, advertising executive, was born on January 28, 1904, in Clarksville, Red River County, Texas. His father, a merchant who had immigrated from Germany, had married Fannie Solomon, a native of Fort Worth, and Sam grew up in Fort Worth, where he attended high school. At age seventeen he became a traveling salesman for Marshall Field and Company, Montgomery Ward, and several wholesale companies. He subsequently became an advertising solicitor for the Fort Worth Record (later the Fort Worth Star-Telegram) and several Scripps-Howard and Hearst newspapers in El Paso and San Antonio; then in 1924 he took a position at the Dallas Times Herald. He rose in 1941 to the position of advertising director there. He was with the Herald almost thirty years and served on the board of directors of the Herald and its radio and television properties.

When he started his own firm around 1952, Zale Jewelryqv was one of his primary accounts. He named his new company Sam Bloom Advertising. In 1961 President John F. Kennedy summoned Bloom to Washington to serve with the White House Conference on Equal Employment and the National Advisory Committee on Desegregation. When he returned to Dallas, Bloom called on merchant Stanley Marcus and others to help begin the integration process (see CIVIL-RIGHTS MOVEMENT) and also produced a film, Dallas at the Crossroads, which was shown all over the South by the Dallas Citizens Council. In these efforts Bloom worked closely with C. A. Tatum, Jr., Robert B. Cullum,qqv Jim Chambers, and John Stemmons. Bloom married Evelyn Goldstein of Fort Worth; the couple had two children. He was an active civic leader and was twice president of Temple Emanu-Elqv. His service as president included the era when the majestic temple on Hillcrest in Dallas was built. The Dallas Advertising League named him Ad Man of the Year in 1972 and presented him with the Bill Kerss Award in 1981 for his service to the community. When Sam Bloom died on July 17, 1983, his son Robert assumed the agency's presidency. At the time, Bloom Advertising had billings of $150 million and 350 employees. Bloom was posthumously named to the Advertising Hall of Fame in New York in December 1990.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Natalie Ornish, Pioneer Jewish Texans (Dallas: Texas Heritage, 1989). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Natalie Ornish

EVANS CAGLAGE/DMN

Robert H. Bloom has marshaled lessons from his 45-year advertising career into a book titled The Inside Advantage . Uncommon is better than unique, he said, because 'unique can be duplicated - if it's uncommon, you own it.'

That's what The Bloom Cos. did in the 1960s, '70s and '80s, as Dallas developed into an international city.

Growing along with young clients such as Southwest Airlines , Zales Jewelers and TGI Friday's, The Bloom Cos. became the largest independent advertising agency based in Dallas. It expanded with offices in New York in the 1980s and in 1991 became part of Paris-based Publicis, which Mr. Bloom later led as U.S. chairman and chief executive.

Now, to create a roadmap for others, Mr. Bloom has marshaled lessons from his 45-year advertising career into a book titled The Inside Advantage.

Robert Bloom: 'I wanted to write a book that tells you how to grow a business'

Published last week by McGraw-Hill and co-authored with Dave Conti, the book outlines Mr. Bloom's suggestions for unlocking and leveraging a business's "uncommon offering."

For example, when Donald Zale was taking Zales Jewelers national, The Bloom Cos. created its message "The Diamond Store." The agency was the first to photograph a necklace up close on a black background with special lighting that made it glitter.

The campaign was brought back in the 1990s to help turn around Zale Corp. and was brought back for a third time last year when a new campaign failed.

The Bloom Cos. also helped Southwest Airlines Co. create its corporate image the uncommonly feminine "Love" theme, which grew from its home base of Dallas Love Field and is still reflected in its LUV ticker symbol today.

The Bloom Cos. was in the right place at the right time. Before Southwest Airlines' first flight in 1971, its founders shared space at The Bloom Cos.' offices.

Mr. Bloom applied the same principles to growing his advertising firm. He unlocked the advantage of its location in the fast-growing Sunbelt to convince big companies that a Dallas perspective would catapult their brands.

The Bloom Cos. went national with assignments from denture cream PoliGrip, Libby's canned meats and Nestle's Juicy Juice, which at the time had the uncommon advantage of being made from 100 percent pure juice. It continued with clients BMW , Perrier, T-Mobile and many others.

Uncommon is better than unique, Mr. Bloom said, because "unique can be duplicated if it's uncommon, you own it."

Mr. Bloom gives the reader clear tools to unlock four steps to growing a business. It starts with identifying the core customer, figuring out the uncommon offering, developing a persuasive strategy, and finally owning it with what he calls imaginative acts that can be big and small.

"Businesses have to grow or die. There's no other choice," Mr. Bloom said.

He learned the advertising business from his father, Sam Bloom, a former Dallas Times-Herald ad executive who started his own agency in 1952. Sam Bloom was known for his community relations efforts in the 1960s, when Dallas and other major cities were dealing with desegregation.

Robert Bloom joined his father's company in 1956. Sam Bloom died in 1983 and supported his son's decision to open an office in New York.

Today, Mr. Bloom still lives in New York with his wife, Harvi, but all three of his children Donald, Laura and Sam live in Dallas, and two followed in the family profession.

Laura Gordon is senior vice president of marketing for The Dallas Morning News . Sam Bloom is head of interactive marketing at Dallas-based Camelot Communications, with clients that include Southwest Airlines, Blockbuster and 7-Eleven.

Edited by William Kelly
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  • 2 weeks later...

Again, remember Jim Marrs' remark in Crossfire, that Kennedy was killed by s Centrist coup, one that united groups of various political stripe that opposed him.

It is difficult to imagine that some of the authorities who facilitated the assassination and covered it up would be loyal to any one ideology, even if they were committed to the ending that occurred.

Thank you for that keen insight David, and I didn't want it to go by unnoticed.

If the assassination was not just the random act of a madman, but a political homicide, and not an attack on the man by the Cubans, Mafia, CIA renegades, or mad husbands, but was a coup d'etat and those who were responsible for his murder took over the powers of the government, then according to Coup d'etat - A Practical Handbook (Lutwak), ALL of the branches of government had to be either compromised or made part of the plan, especially for what they were to do after the first part the murder, was accomplished.

So all this talk about the assassination being the work of right wingers or leftists, democratics or republicans, right handers or lefthanders, catholics or jews, just doesn't realy fit into the real equation at all.

Then again, Michael Collins Piper has been trying to call attention to Sam Bloom for years, as part of the Jewish conspiracy, but the first person I remember to call attention to Bloom's role in the planning of the motorcade was Mae Brussell, a Jew.

BK

Edited by William Kelly
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  • 1 year later...

Lee Harvey Oswald's time card, in his own hand writing, for Tues. May 12, 1963, when employed at Jaggers/Chiles/Stoval and notes that he worked on a project for Sam Bloom, who was one of those responsible for the selectoin of the Trade Mart, the direction of the motorcade through Dealey Plaza and many of the motorcade details.

Gary Mack calls this "guilt by association."

I say it is guilt by association.

Warren Commission Hearings and Exhibits

BK

Remember the Intrepid

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