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Tom, the pics gone now, not looking forward to redoing them, but Allan had the pipes pushed off to the side. The actual room available with the boxes in place was very restricted. While the shots from the point of view of whether someone COULD shoot from there to the points of impact, I don't dispute at all, including the possibility of tree limb shenanigans. What I see is a very good shootng from a very small window of opportunity. Certainly good in the sense that the objective was achieved. This speaks of a, perhaps justified, supreme confidence and a stupidity at the same time. What if he'd missed?

Also on another vein, speaking as teacher to a neophyte ( lets say ( and it's just about true, I wouldn't know which end is which...) could you explain, whether the dissassembled rifle could be put in a paper sack and be carried WITH the sling over the shoulder and in this way hidden under a jacket AND then be assembled without removing the sling, thank you.

1. Based on the known knowledge relative to the "paper bag", it would appear highly unlikely that

the Model 91/38 Carcano Short Rifle was carried into the TSDB in a single episode.

2. This would therefore indicate that:

A. A portion of the rifle, which would have most probably been merely the stock of the weapon, was

carried into the TSDB and "hidden", possibly at a prior date.

B. The receiver and barrel portion of the weapon was carried into the TSDB on the day in which LHO

had gone to the Paine home.

Now!

The weapon stock could easily have been carried into the TSDB in a "reverse sling arms" mode, under

a raincoat, with little notice.

I am of the opinion that this is most probably how LHO transported ANY Carcano weapon in his possession

around town.

Receiver and barrel in the paper bag, which few would question due to length, etc;, and weapon stock

carried under the cover of a raincoat at a reverse sling arms in either position. (Stock butt up or stock butt down).

There also exists the possiblity that LHO previously carried the weapon stock into the TSDB in a "paper bag" as well.

Although I have not taken the time to fully research the matter, the "paper bag" which was sent to a fictional address may have some bearing on this, just as the "package" which the US Mail failed to deleiver to LHO at the Paine address, may also have some bearing on this.

The WC and/or the FBI did not want to broach onto the subject matter of the high probability that LHO had

carried the weapon into the TSDB in two seperate and distinctive operations, as this would absolutely prove "Prior Intent", which would tend to dispell the "Lone Nut" theory that LHO merely got disgruntled, went to the Paine home on the night of 11/21/63, and then got up the next morning and decided to shoot JFK.

Nevertheless, it should be quite obvious that LHO did not ride around Dallas, or for that matter anywhere else, with a fully assembled Model 91/38 Carcano Rifle, carried in some flimsy paper bag.

The location of the "sling"/carrying strap pad would indicate that LHO carried the weapon in an upside down version of sling arms. Which, by the way is a standard procedure that is readily learned in all

branches of the military service as this keeps rain/etc; from entering the barrel of the weapon while walking guard duty in the rain.

Additionally, when walking guard duty in the rain, (why did you think I long ago posted the annual rainfall in Japan?) one can carry the weapon in and upside down version of sling arms and also place the poncho on without the barrel of the weapon protruding higher than the shoulder and affecting the wear of the poncho.

All of which, LHO as a US Marine, walking guard duty in japan, would have readily learned.

Lastly:

What I see is a very good shootng from a very small window of opportunity

The window was neither small, nor was the "window of opportunity".

The window from which the shot eminated, was in fact IDEAL.

It offered the ability to see the target coming into full view long prior to entering what became the "kill zone"; It offered the ability to, if necessary engage the target as it approached, or, wait untill the

target was in a "going away" position, which happens to be vertually always best in an "ambush"

shooting; It offered that "turn point" onto Elm St. which caused he target top have to decrease speed;

it offered a position/location in which there could be virtually no interference with line-of-sight by some

unaccounted for conditions (spectators, etc;) ; it offered an "obstacle' between the shooters position and

the target; and the listing goes on and on, and on.

Which, when taken into total consideration, would serve to indicate that a true "SNIPER" of first class ability, chose the location.

Nevertheless, the shooting in Dealy Plaza on 11/22/63, was actually only "marginal", which demonstrates the inexperience of the shooter in this type shooting scenario.

Choice of firing position, by far exceeded what LHO should have been aware of.

Shooting ability achieved, it far more in line with what LHO's demonstrated ability was.

Anyone who listens to this "Buck Fever" BS, no doubt gets a good laugh.

Buck Fever comes into play primarily as a result of taking the first shot available as soon as the deer/buck

comes into view. As opposed to the wait until the target gets into the open and/or designated and preferable kill zone.

Someone (whoever the shooter was), knew exactly when and where his preferential shots were to be made, and he also sat and waited.

He could have easily achieved, at minimum, a "body shot" as the Presidential limo approached, yet sat and waited until the "best" fire zone was achieved, and then went for the head shots.

So, under the assumption that LHO made these shots (which were marginally accurate at best), somewhere, he acquired training and/or instructions in target acquisition which were far and above his indicated training.

Just as was the chosen firing location far and above his indicated training.

Take this to the bank!

1. The Sixth Floor Window of the TSDB, from which the three shot were fired, was, for all practical purposes, one of the absolutely best firing positions which one could have. Be it in urban, or jungle

shooting.

2. The "choice" of this absolutely excellent firing position, by far exceeded any indicated training

which LHO appears to have received.

3. The actual shooting from the Sixth Floor Window, was, with all things considered, marginal at best.

4. The lack of taking the "first shot" as JFK approached the TSDB on Main St, is fully indicative that

someone had at least informed the shooter of the advantages of the "going away" shot, v. the approaching shot.

5. The Sixth Floor also fully provided for a "contingency" location at the other end of the building.

Which happens to be where someone was observed while the "sniper's nest" position was taken up by

the Negro workman who was eating his lunch.

6. The "other" position was a considerably "less desirable" position as one would not have had the

advantage of full observation of the approaching target, as well as the fact that one would have had to be shooting at a target which was travelling laterally across the field of fire.

So, when someone tells you that the Sixth Floor Window was a poor location, ask them to name any other position in which the shooting position was virtually "by the book" on all of the advantages which a good shooting position is determined.

Best position, better than average shooter; three shots, three hits.

Tom

P.S. Exactly what kind of idiot would attempt to "frame" someone who in reality was, as is erroneously reported, a poor shot.

Exactly what kind of idiot would "hire" someone to perform the task, if that person had not demonstrated the ability to achieve the shooting feat?

Thank you Tom. (I'll leave the issue of space between boxes and pipes and pipe to seating box et.c. for now) could you elaborate on an assembly with sling. Why attach useless carry sling in assembled separately carried rifle parts?

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Tom, the pics gone now, not looking forward to redoing them, but Allan had the pipes pushed off to the side. The actual room available with the boxes in place was very restricted. While the shots from the point of view of whether someone COULD shoot from there to the points of impact, I don't dispute at all, including the possibility of tree limb shenanigans. What I see is a very good shootng from a very small window of opportunity. Certainly good in the sense that the objective was achieved. This speaks of a, perhaps justified, supreme confidence and a stupidity at the same time. What if he'd missed?

Also on another vein, speaking as teacher to a neophyte ( lets say ( and it's just about true, I wouldn't know which end is which...) could you explain, whether the dissassembled rifle could be put in a paper sack and be carried WITH the sling over the shoulder and in this way hidden under a jacket AND then be assembled without removing the sling, thank you.

1. Based on the known knowledge relative to the "paper bag", it would appear highly unlikely that

the Model 91/38 Carcano Short Rifle was carried into the TSDB in a single episode.

2. This would therefore indicate that:

A. A portion of the rifle, which would have most probably been merely the stock of the weapon, was

carried into the TSDB and "hidden", possibly at a prior date.

B. The receiver and barrel portion of the weapon was carried into the TSDB on the day in which LHO

had gone to the Paine home.

Now!

The weapon stock could easily have been carried into the TSDB in a "reverse sling arms" mode, under

a raincoat, with little notice.

I am of the opinion that this is most probably how LHO transported ANY Carcano weapon in his possession

around town.

Receiver and barrel in the paper bag, which few would question due to length, etc;, and weapon stock

carried under the cover of a raincoat at a reverse sling arms in either position. (Stock butt up or stock butt down).

There also exists the possiblity that LHO previously carried the weapon stock into the TSDB in a "paper bag" as well.

Although I have not taken the time to fully research the matter, the "paper bag" which was sent to a fictional address may have some bearing on this, just as the "package" which the US Mail failed to deleiver to LHO at the Paine address, may also have some bearing on this.

The WC and/or the FBI did not want to broach onto the subject matter of the high probability that LHO had

carried the weapon into the TSDB in two seperate and distinctive operations, as this would absolutely prove "Prior Intent", which would tend to dispell the "Lone Nut" theory that LHO merely got disgruntled, went to the Paine home on the night of 11/21/63, and then got up the next morning and decided to shoot JFK.

Nevertheless, it should be quite obvious that LHO did not ride around Dallas, or for that matter anywhere else, with a fully assembled Model 91/38 Carcano Rifle, carried in some flimsy paper bag.

The location of the "sling"/carrying strap pad would indicate that LHO carried the weapon in an upside down version of sling arms. Which, by the way is a standard procedure that is readily learned in all

branches of the military service as this keeps rain/etc; from entering the barrel of the weapon while walking guard duty in the rain.

Additionally, when walking guard duty in the rain, (why did you think I long ago posted the annual rainfall in Japan?) one can carry the weapon in and upside down version of sling arms and also place the poncho on without the barrel of the weapon protruding higher than the shoulder and affecting the wear of the poncho.

All of which, LHO as a US Marine, walking guard duty in japan, would have readily learned.

Lastly:

What I see is a very good shootng from a very small window of opportunity

The window was neither small, nor was the "window of opportunity".

The window from which the shot eminated, was in fact IDEAL.

It offered the ability to see the target coming into full view long prior to entering what became the "kill zone"; It offered the ability to, if necessary engage the target as it approached, or, wait untill the

target was in a "going away" position, which happens to be vertually always best in an "ambush"

shooting; It offered that "turn point" onto Elm St. which caused he target top have to decrease speed;

it offered a position/location in which there could be virtually no interference with line-of-sight by some

unaccounted for conditions (spectators, etc;) ; it offered an "obstacle' between the shooters position and

the target; and the listing goes on and on, and on.

Which, when taken into total consideration, would serve to indicate that a true "SNIPER" of first class ability, chose the location.

Nevertheless, the shooting in Dealy Plaza on 11/22/63, was actually only "marginal", which demonstrates the inexperience of the shooter in this type shooting scenario.

Choice of firing position, by far exceeded what LHO should have been aware of.

Shooting ability achieved, it far more in line with what LHO's demonstrated ability was.

Anyone who listens to this "Buck Fever" BS, no doubt gets a good laugh.

Buck Fever comes into play primarily as a result of taking the first shot available as soon as the deer/buck

comes into view. As opposed to the wait until the target gets into the open and/or designated and preferable kill zone.

Someone (whoever the shooter was), knew exactly when and where his preferential shots were to be made, and he also sat and waited.

He could have easily achieved, at minimum, a "body shot" as the Presidential limo approached, yet sat and waited until the "best" fire zone was achieved, and then went for the head shots.

So, under the assumption that LHO made these shots (which were marginally accurate at best), somewhere, he acquired training and/or instructions in target acquisition which were far and above his indicated training.

Just as was the chosen firing location far and above his indicated training.

Take this to the bank!

1. The Sixth Floor Window of the TSDB, from which the three shot were fired, was, for all practical purposes, one of the absolutely best firing positions which one could have. Be it in urban, or jungle

shooting.

2. The "choice" of this absolutely excellent firing position, by far exceeded any indicated training

which LHO appears to have received.

3. The actual shooting from the Sixth Floor Window, was, with all things considered, marginal at best.

4. The lack of taking the "first shot" as JFK approached the TSDB on Main St, is fully indicative that

someone had at least informed the shooter of the advantages of the "going away" shot, v. the approaching shot.

5. The Sixth Floor also fully provided for a "contingency" location at the other end of the building.

Which happens to be where someone was observed while the "sniper's nest" position was taken up by

the Negro workman who was eating his lunch.

6. The "other" position was a considerably "less desirable" position as one would not have had the

advantage of full observation of the approaching target, as well as the fact that one would have had to be shooting at a target which was travelling laterally across the field of fire.

So, when someone tells you that the Sixth Floor Window was a poor location, ask them to name any other position in which the shooting position was virtually "by the book" on all of the advantages which a good shooting position is determined.

Best position, better than average shooter; three shots, three hits.

Tom

P.S. Exactly what kind of idiot would attempt to "frame" someone who in reality was, as is erroneously reported, a poor shot.

Exactly what kind of idiot would "hire" someone to perform the task, if that person had not demonstrated the ability to achieve the shooting feat?

Thank you Tom. (I'll leave the issue of space between boxes and pipes and pipe to seating box et.c. for now) could you elaborate on an assembly with sling. Why attach useless carry sling in assembled separately carried rifle parts?

John:

The sling/carrying strap attaches to the forward end of the stock by looping through a swivel head/keeper which is an integral part of the bolt which goes through the stock and holds the forward barrel band in place.

Of course, one can "undo" the actual strap, however, when one takes the weapon apart, the sling/carrying strap and it's keeper and bolt remain attached to the stock through the stock attachement for the sling/carrying strap.

After removal of the barrel and receiver, on can re-install the sling keeper onto the stock, re-insert the sling keeper bolt through the barrell band and stock and re-screw in the bolt from the opposite side which holds this in place.

This now places the weapon stock and sling EXACTLY the same as if the rifle barrel and receiver were there, and it facilitates

carrying of the stock in the "sling-arms" position.

Whether carrying it in normal position, or in the upside down position.

Plus, the added "shoulder pad" assists in carrying it as well, and with it's found position relative to the butt of the stock, this pad would have only served a purpose if the weapon were carried in the upside down (butt upwards) position.

And, having a nice shoulder pad to bear the weight of either he stock or the complete weapon, is much better than having

a junky "rope" (as seen in the backyard photo's) cutting into one's shoulder.

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OK, Tom...you make a fairly convincing argument.

But refer back to the "Bond" topic, and especially the photo showing the view from the Dal-Tex building.

It would appear, from the photo, that this location would also have all the advantages you ascribe to the SE window of the 6th floor of the TSBD.

Only disadvantage of the Dal-Tex location, as far as I can see, is that the traffic light might have interfered with your 3rd shot at the Altgens position...and I only say "might," because it appears to me that the limo would've had to go beyond the point where the light/arm crosses the shooting field to reach the Altgens position.

I DO, however, agree with your position that the circumstances of the assassination tend to indicate that Ozzie didn't just wake up on the morning of November 22 and decide to shoot the President at that time. Nor did the idea occur on the 21st, either. And I would concur that, if the shooter actually was LHO, he was trained far beyond what his USMC record indicates.

What I do have problems with are reports that news reporters [and others] on the 22nd moved and shifted boxes around, so that we really don't know with any degree of accuracy exactly what the "sniper's lair" acutally looked like. And, again pointing out the short distance from the floor to the windowsill, I just can't picture anyone--even a 5'6" version of LHO--firing from that window from a standing position...the windowsill coming to about mid-calf on a standing person, the window when fully open wouldn't have allowed anyone to shoot from a standing position unless (1) they were shooting at a rather pronounced downward angle, say 30 degrees or so; or (2) the shooter was a distance of approximately 8 to 10 feet away from the window; or (3) the shooter was a circus midget. Scenarios one and two conflict with known facts and eyewitness testimony, and I have yet to read any reports of a circus in Dallas on November 22, 1963 that was missing a midget at 12:30 pm.

But I COULD picture someone taking a "bench rest" position on a book carton, and firing from a kneeling or sitting position [again, taking the height of the windowsill from the floor into consideration].

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Thanks for that Bernice.

And Mark, I agree, it would be impossible for the Sixth Floor Sniper to be standing for any shots.

But a lot of what Thom has to say makes sense.

Regardless of the distance between the shooter and the target, the Sixth Floor shooter was still a sniper, and I think, went by the book:

Field Manual 23-10

FM 23-10

4-13 POSITIONS IN URBAN TERRAIN

Positions in urban terrain are quite different than positions in the field. The sniper team normally has several places to choose. These can range from inside attics to street-level positions in basements. This type of terrain is ideal for a sniper, and a sniper team can stop an enemy's advance through its area of responsibility.

  • When constructing an urban position, the sniper team must be aware of the outside appearance of the structure. Shooting through loopholes in barricaded windows is preferred; the team must make sure al other windows are also barricaded. Building loopholes in other windows also provide more positions to engage targets. When building loopholes, the team should make them different shapes (not perfect squares or circles). Dummy loopholes also confuse the enemy positions in attics are also effective….

(1) The sniper team should not locate the position against contrasting background or in prominent buildings that automatically draw attention. It must stay in the shadows while moving, observing and engaging targets.

(2) The team must never fire close to a loophole. It should always back away from the hole as far as possible to hide the muzzle flash and to scatter the sound of the weapon when it fires…

  • Common sense and imagination are the sniper team's only limitation in the construction of urban hide positions. Urban hide positions that can be used are the room hide, craw space hide, and rafter hide. The team constructs and occupies one of these positions or a variation thereof.

(1) Room hide position. In a room hide position, the sniper team uses an existing room and fires through a window or loophole. (Figure 4-13). Weapon support may be achieved through the use of existing furniture-that is, desks or tables. When selecting a position, teams must notice both front and back window positions. To avoid silhouetting, they may need to use a backdrop such as a dark-colored blanket, canvas, carpet, and a screen. Screens (common screening material) are important since they allow the sniper teams maximum observation and deny observation to the enemy. They must not remove curtains; however, they can open windows or remove panes of glass. Remember, teams can randomly remove panes in other windows so the position is not obvious…

  • Sniper teams use the technique best suited for the urban hide position.

(1) The second floor of a building is usually the best location for the urban hide position. It presents minimal dead space but provides the team more protection since passersby cannot easily spot it.

(2) Normally, a window is the best viewing aperture/loophole.

(a) If the window is dirty, do not clean it for better viewing.

( :lol: If curtains are prevalent in the area, do not remove those in the position...

(7) If the site is not multiroomed, partitions can be made by hanging blankets or nets to separate the operating area from the rest/administration area…

(10) Always plan an escape route that leads to the objective rally point. When forced to vacate the position, the team meats the security element at the ORP. Normally the team will not be able to leave from the same point at which it gained access; therefore, a separate escape point may be required in emergency situations. The team must consider windows (other than for viewing aperatures); anchored ropes to climb down buildings,….

( B) Urban camouflaged uniforms can be made or purchased….

(e) Civilian clothing can be worn (native/host country populace)

(f) Tradesmen's or construction worker's uniform and accessories can be used…..

- Certainty of Target's Identity. The sniper team must be reasonable certain that the target it is considering is the key target.

- Target Effect on the Enemy. The sniper team must consider what effect the elimination of the target will have on the enemy's fighting ability. It must determine that the target is the one available target that will cause the greatest harm to the enemy.

- Enemy Reaction to Sniper Fire. The sniper team must consider what the enemy will do once the shot has been fired. The team must be prepared for such action as immediate suppression by indirect fires and enemy sweeps of the area.

INSERTION

Insertion is the first critical phase of sniper operations. Regardless of the mission, the team must pass through terrain where the enemy may use sophisticated detection devices. The selected method of insertion depends on the mission, enemy situation, resources available, weather and terrain, depth of penetration, and mission priority.

6-1 PLANNING INSERTION

The preferred method of insertion is the one that best reduces the chance of detection. To provide the most current and specific details on the target area and infiltration routes from all sources, the headquarters and the sniper team adhere to the following.

a. Intelligence. Base operational plans on timely and accurate intelligence…

b. Deception. Make plans to deny the enemy knowledge of the sniper team's insertion or to deceive him as to the location or intent of the operation. False insertions and other cover operations…false transmissions, contribute to sniper deception plans. Select unexpected means of insertion, times, places, and routes, coupled with speed and mobility to help deceive the enemy. Also include plans diversionary fires to direct the enemy's attention away from the team…

  • Stealth. Stress stealth to avoid detection or interception by the enemy at the time of insertion during movement along routes and while traveling from the insertion area to the target area….

f. Security. Emphasize security measures to prevent compromise of the impending operation during preparation. This includes the security of rehearsal and training sites. Some measures that may be used to assist in maintaining security areas follows: 1) Restrict access to the isolation area during planning. 2) Brief details of the operation to the team in the isolation area. 3) Limit knowledge of planned operations on a need-to-know basis…

6-11 PLANNING

The sniper team must be prepared to exfiltrate over predetermined land routes to friendly lines as a team (or individually) or to exfiltrate to an area for extratction by air or water…. The sniper team may be required to hide for several days to allow the enemy to become complacent before the team tries to move.

…..In selecting extraction sites, the sniper considers the danger of compromising other activities. He must prepare alternate plans for unforeseen developments….

6-15 VEHICLE EXTRACTION.

Vehicle extraction involves the exfiltration of the sniper team to an extraction site for extraction by a wheeled or tracked vehicle. Planning and coordination must be made during the preinsertion phase. Contingency plans must be made to avoid compromise or any unforeseen situations.

6-16 RECOVERY

Recovery is the last phase of a sniper operation. It consists of the sniper team's return to the operations base, debriefing, equipment maintenance and turn –in, and stand-down. At the end of this phase, the sniper team prepares for future missions.

Edited by William Kelly
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  • 3 weeks later...
Thanks for that Bernice.

And Mark, I agree, it would be impossible for the Sixth Floor Sniper to be standing for any shots.

But a lot of what Thom has to say makes sense.

Regardless of the distance between the shooter and the target, the Sixth Floor shooter was still a sniper, and I think, went by the book:

Field Manual 23-10

FM 23-10

4-13 POSITIONS IN URBAN TERRAIN

Positions in urban terrain are quite different than positions in the field. The sniper team normally has several places to choose. These can range from inside attics to street-level positions in basements. This type of terrain is ideal for a sniper, and a sniper team can stop an enemy's advance through its area of responsibility.

  • When constructing an urban position, the sniper team must be aware of the outside appearance of the structure. Shooting through loopholes in barricaded windows is preferred; the team must make sure al other windows are also barricaded. Building loopholes in other windows also provide more positions to engage targets. When building loopholes, the team should make them different shapes (not perfect squares or circles). Dummy loopholes also confuse the enemy positions in attics are also effective….

(1) The sniper team should not locate the position against contrasting background or in prominent buildings that automatically draw attention. It must stay in the shadows while moving, observing and engaging targets.

(2) The team must never fire close to a loophole. It should always back away from the hole as far as possible to hide the muzzle flash and to scatter the sound of the weapon when it fires…

  • Common sense and imagination are the sniper team's only limitation in the construction of urban hide positions. Urban hide positions that can be used are the room hide, craw space hide, and rafter hide. The team constructs and occupies one of these positions or a variation thereof.

(1) Room hide position. In a room hide position, the sniper team uses an existing room and fires through a window or loophole. (Figure 4-13). Weapon support may be achieved through the use of existing furniture-that is, desks or tables. When selecting a position, teams must notice both front and back window positions. To avoid silhouetting, they may need to use a backdrop such as a dark-colored blanket, canvas, carpet, and a screen. Screens (common screening material) are important since they allow the sniper teams maximum observation and deny observation to the enemy. They must not remove curtains; however, they can open windows or remove panes of glass. Remember, teams can randomly remove panes in other windows so the position is not obvious…

  • Sniper teams use the technique best suited for the urban hide position.

(1) The second floor of a building is usually the best location for the urban hide position. It presents minimal dead space but provides the team more protection since passersby cannot easily spot it.

(2) Normally, a window is the best viewing aperture/loophole.

(a) If the window is dirty, do not clean it for better viewing.

( B) If curtains are prevalent in the area, do not remove those in the position...

(7) If the site is not multiroomed, partitions can be made by hanging blankets or nets to separate the operating area from the rest/administration area…

(10) Always plan an escape route that leads to the objective rally point. When forced to vacate the position, the team meats the security element at the ORP. Normally the team will not be able to leave from the same point at which it gained access; therefore, a separate escape point may be required in emergency situations. The team must consider windows (other than for viewing aperatures); anchored ropes to climb down buildings,….

( B) Urban camouflaged uniforms can be made or purchased….

(e) Civilian clothing can be worn (native/host country populace)

(f) Tradesmen's or construction worker's uniform and accessories can be used…..

- Certainty of Target's Identity. The sniper team must be reasonable certain that the target it is considering is the key target.

- Target Effect on the Enemy. The sniper team must consider what effect the elimination of the target will have on the enemy's fighting ability. It must determine that the target is the one available target that will cause the greatest harm to the enemy.

- Enemy Reaction to Sniper Fire. The sniper team must consider what the enemy will do once the shot has been fired. The team must be prepared for such action as immediate suppression by indirect fires and enemy sweeps of the area.

INSERTION

Insertion is the first critical phase of sniper operations. Regardless of the mission, the team must pass through terrain where the enemy may use sophisticated detection devices. The selected method of insertion depends on the mission, enemy situation, resources available, weather and terrain, depth of penetration, and mission priority.

6-1 PLANNING INSERTION

The preferred method of insertion is the one that best reduces the chance of detection. To provide the most current and specific details on the target area and infiltration routes from all sources, the headquarters and the sniper team adhere to the following.

a. Intelligence. Base operational plans on timely and accurate intelligence…

b. Deception. Make plans to deny the enemy knowledge of the sniper team's insertion or to deceive him as to the location or intent of the operation. False insertions and other cover operations…false transmissions, contribute to sniper deception plans. Select unexpected means of insertion, times, places, and routes, coupled with speed and mobility to help deceive the enemy. Also include plans diversionary fires to direct the enemy's attention away from the team…

  • Stealth. Stress stealth to avoid detection or interception by the enemy at the time of insertion during movement along routes and while traveling from the insertion area to the target area….

f. Security. Emphasize security measures to prevent compromise of the impending operation during preparation. This includes the security of rehearsal and training sites. Some measures that may be used to assist in maintaining security areas follows: 1) Restrict access to the isolation area during planning. 2) Brief details of the operation to the team in the isolation area. 3) Limit knowledge of planned operations on a need-to-know basis…

6-11 PLANNING

The sniper team must be prepared to exfiltrate over predetermined land routes to friendly lines as a team (or individually) or to exfiltrate to an area for extratction by air or water…. The sniper team may be required to hide for several days to allow the enemy to become complacent before the team tries to move.

…..In selecting extraction sites, the sniper considers the danger of compromising other activities. He must prepare alternate plans for unforeseen developments….

6-15 VEHICLE EXTRACTION.

Vehicle extraction involves the exfiltration of the sniper team to an extraction site for extraction by a wheeled or tracked vehicle. Planning and coordination must be made during the preinsertion phase. Contingency plans must be made to avoid compromise or any unforeseen situations.

6-16 RECOVERY

Recovery is the last phase of a sniper operation. It consists of the sniper team's return to the operations base, debriefing, equipment maintenance and turn –in, and stand-down. At the end of this phase, the sniper team prepares for future missions.

The following is a fairly extended section of WCD 206 regarding the sling, about four pages.

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...mp;relPageId=30

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Thanks Mike and Tom,

Your imput appreciated.

So its not an Air Force sidearm holsters, its a pre-1947 US Army Air Force shoulder strap for a pistol holder.

Has anybody bothered to look at this closer?

Is there a manufacturer's number or anything that would distinguish it from any other similar strap?

It had to come from somewhere.

If it wasn't used to sling the rifle over your shoulder and across the back, then it had to have another use, as it just wasn't added for looks.

BK

Could it have been used by someone to hold the assembled rifle close to the body underneath a long coat?

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Thanks Mike and Tom,

Your imput appreciated.

So its not an Air Force sidearm holsters, its a pre-1947 US Army Air Force shoulder strap for a pistol holder.

Has anybody bothered to look at this closer?

Is there a manufacturer's number or anything that would distinguish it from any other similar strap?

It had to come from somewhere.

If it wasn't used to sling the rifle over your shoulder and across the back, then it had to have another use, as it just wasn't added for looks.

BK

Could it have been used by someone to hold the assembled rifle close to the body underneath a long coat?

Chuck,

It could indeed have been used to carry the rifle under a raincoat, as Thom as suggested earler in this thread, specifically on the night of the Walker shooting.

And Robert, thanks for the FBI investigative reports. It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?

BK

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Thanks Mike and Tom,

Your imput appreciated.

So its not an Air Force sidearm holsters, its a pre-1947 US Army Air Force shoulder strap for a pistol holder.

Has anybody bothered to look at this closer?

Is there a manufacturer's number or anything that would distinguish it from any other similar strap?

It had to come from somewhere.

If it wasn't used to sling the rifle over your shoulder and across the back, then it had to have another use, as it just wasn't added for looks.

BK

Could it have been used by someone to hold the assembled rifle close to the body underneath a long coat?

Chuck,

It could indeed have been used to carry the rifle under a raincoat, as Thom as suggested earler in this thread, specifically on the night of the Walker shooting.

And Robert, thanks for the FBI investigative reports. It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?

BK

There is a possible explanation in that what they would have found would have been detrimental to the whole official version of events, ie more convenient to lose sight of where the cartridges and particulars emanated from than selling the chain of possession, [lol] of the Mannlicher.

I also wouldn't assume "they gave up trying."

Another version could have been, that they did find out, and that information is buried in a classified document somewhere.

Having said that, does not mean that someday there will be a declassified document released that explains all of this, as long as there are issues with being able to read documents, or to put it another way, wish you had a million dollars for every time you came across a document that was illegible, who ran the copying machine over there anyway, Jed Clampett..lol

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Thanks Mike and Tom,

Your imput appreciated.

So its not an Air Force sidearm holsters, its a pre-1947 US Army Air Force shoulder strap for a pistol holder.

Has anybody bothered to look at this closer?

Is there a manufacturer's number or anything that would distinguish it from any other similar strap?

It had to come from somewhere.

If it wasn't used to sling the rifle over your shoulder and across the back, then it had to have another use, as it just wasn't added for looks.

BK

Could it have been used by someone to hold the assembled rifle close to the body underneath a long coat?

Chuck,

It could indeed have been used to carry the rifle under a raincoat, as Thom as suggested earler in this thread, specifically on the night of the Walker shooting.

And Robert, thanks for the FBI investigative reports. It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?

BK

"It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?"

By way of a completely "round-a-bout" discussion, it would appear that someone is actually beginning to get "warm" as to the potential importance of the sling.

Simply amazing what one can learn with merely a little research!

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Thanks Mike and Tom,

Your imput appreciated.

So its not an Air Force sidearm holsters, its a pre-1947 US Army Air Force shoulder strap for a pistol holder.

Has anybody bothered to look at this closer?

Is there a manufacturer's number or anything that would distinguish it from any other similar strap?

It had to come from somewhere.

If it wasn't used to sling the rifle over your shoulder and across the back, then it had to have another use, as it just wasn't added for looks.

BK

Could it have been used by someone to hold the assembled rifle close to the body underneath a long coat?

Chuck,

It could indeed have been used to carry the rifle under a raincoat, as Thom as suggested earler in this thread, specifically on the night of the Walker shooting.

And Robert, thanks for the FBI investigative reports. It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?

BK

"It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?"

By way of a completely "round-a-bout" discussion, it would appear that someone is actually beginning to get "warm" as to the potential importance of the sling.

Simply amazing what one can learn with merely a little research!

Now if we can only find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized, then we might be able to say we did a little research.

BK

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Thanks Mike and Tom,

Your imput appreciated.

So its not an Air Force sidearm holsters, its a pre-1947 US Army Air Force shoulder strap for a pistol holder.

Has anybody bothered to look at this closer?

Is there a manufacturer's number or anything that would distinguish it from any other similar strap?

It had to come from somewhere.

If it wasn't used to sling the rifle over your shoulder and across the back, then it had to have another use, as it just wasn't added for looks.

BK

Could it have been used by someone to hold the assembled rifle close to the body underneath a long coat?

Chuck,

It could indeed have been used to carry the rifle under a raincoat, as Thom as suggested earler in this thread, specifically on the night of the Walker shooting.

And Robert, thanks for the FBI investigative reports. It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?

BK

"It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?"

By way of a completely "round-a-bout" discussion, it would appear that someone is actually beginning to get "warm" as to the potential importance of the sling.

Simply amazing what one can learn with merely a little research!

Now if we can only find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized, then we might be able to say we did a little research.

BK

Sufficiently simple!

1. It came from a WWII/Korean Conflict shoulder holster for an old WWII U.S. Army Air Corps issue.

2. It was placed onto the Carcano by the person who utilized the rifle to shoot JFK. IE: LHO!

3. Not unlike virtually any other sling, it was utilized to carry the weapon and/or stock of the weapon.

(It was virtually worthless for any of the mythological "Sniper Sling Shooting" scenario's.)

Lastly, most likely, bassed on:

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...mp;relPageId=30

It was not acquired around the Dallas area.

Perhaps the FBI should have, not unlike actually investigating into the true background of LHO (which they also did not do), asked around in the New Orleans area for an answer or two.

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Thanks Mike and Tom,

Your imput appreciated.

So its not an Air Force sidearm holsters, its a pre-1947 US Army Air Force shoulder strap for a pistol holder.

Has anybody bothered to look at this closer?

Is there a manufacturer's number or anything that would distinguish it from any other similar strap?

It had to come from somewhere.

If it wasn't used to sling the rifle over your shoulder and across the back, then it had to have another use, as it just wasn't added for looks.

BK

Could it have been used by someone to hold the assembled rifle close to the body underneath a long coat?

Chuck,

It could indeed have been used to carry the rifle under a raincoat, as Thom as suggested earler in this thread, specifically on the night of the Walker shooting.

And Robert, thanks for the FBI investigative reports. It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?

BK

"It makes one wonder why they went to all that trouble of finding out what the thing actually is, and then gave up on trying to find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized?"

By way of a completely "round-a-bout" discussion, it would appear that someone is actually beginning to get "warm" as to the potential importance of the sling.

Simply amazing what one can learn with merely a little research!

Now if we can only find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized, then we might be able to say we did a little research.

BK

"Now if we can only find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized, then we might be able to say we did a little research."

BK

So! Let's see if we can figure out some of this great enigma.

1. The sling/carrying strap was not on the rifle when LHO was photographed holding the weapon in the "backyard photo's".

2. The FBI questioned persons all over the Dallas area in regards to the sling, with zero results.

3. LHO, shortly after the backyard photo's, moved to New Orleans.

4. The FBI, of knowledge, questioned no one in New Orleans, relative to the sling.

5. LHO frequently talked "gun-talk" with Adrian Alba of the Crescent City Garage.

6. Adrain Alba gave testimony to the WC in regards to LHO's gun/rifle interest. He gave no testimony relative to the leather carrying strap/sling, and no questions were asked of him relative to that subject.

http://www.ajweberman.com/nodules2/nodulec14.htm

Note: The most simple place to read this. In event that one wants to read the entire content and context, might I recommend that they review what Adrian Alba had to say during the HSCA questioning.

The HSCA interviewed Alba on January 24, 1978:

""One time OSWALD came into the garage with a rifle sling and asked if he could put a rivet in a piece of leather. Alba did, using a small anvil from his shop which he still has in his possession. The piece that he put in was a light tan color and slightly wider, but not as thick as the original which, according to him, was black leather. OSWALD told him it was from his Italian rifle."

Now, at last accounting, Adrian Alba was still living, as was his son. So in event that I was of the misguided impression that I could actually find out exactly where LHO obtained the sling/carrying strap, and that information would actually serve any purpose in clarification of the shooting event in Dealey Plaza on 11/22/63, then I could drive over to New Orleans and/or Baton Rouge and ask around.

However! Being semi-retired, I do not waste money like I did back in the late 80's/early 90's in regards to chasing non-productive knowledge which in all probability would not tell me anything even were I to actually find the answer.

LHO had no sling/carrying strap when the backyard photo's were taken.

Adrian Alba assisted LHO with work on a leather carrying strap.

The Model 91/38 Short Rifle found on the sixth floor of the TSDB contained a leather sling/carrying strap.

Mystery solved!

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Hint: No self-respecting shooter is going to walk around in any public arena with a "rope sling" on his weapon.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

P.S. For Mr. McKnight (if still out there)

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/alba.htm

Mr. ALBA - No; he didn't. He did make a remark that he had--I think he said he had several rifles and, several pistols, but he did not go into the nature of the arms, or how much, or what they were.

Blowing Smoke????----Who knows, and certainly far too late to find out what other weapons LHO may have ordered through the various mail-order catalogs.

Isn't it simply amazing what one can learn if they bother to research their subject matter?

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"Now if we can only find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized, then we might be able to say we did a little research."

BK

Tom: So! Let's see if we can figure out some of this great enigma.

1. The sling/carrying strap was not on the rifle when LHO was photographed holding the weapon in the "backyard photo's".

2. The FBI questioned persons all over the Dallas area in regards to the sling, with zero results.

3. LHO, shortly after the backyard photo's, moved to New Orleans.

4. The FBI, of knowledge, questioned no one in New Orleans, relative to the sling.

5. LHO frequently talked "gun-talk" with Adrian Alba of the Crescent City Garage.

6. Adrain Alba gave testimony to the WC in regards to LHO's gun/rifle interest. He gave no testimony relative to the leather carrying strap/sling, and no questions were asked of him relative to that subject.

http://www.ajweberman.com/nodules2/nodulec14.htm

Note: The most simple place to read this. In event that one wants to read the entire content and context, might I recommend that they review what Adrian Alba had to say during the HSCA questioning.

The HSCA interviewed Alba on January 24, 1978:

""One time OSWALD came into the garage with a rifle sling and asked if he could put a rivet in a piece of leather. Alba did, using a small anvil from his shop which he still has in his possession. The piece that he put in was a light tan color and slightly wider, but not as thick as the original which, according to him, was black leather. OSWALD told him it was from his Italian rifle."

Now, at last accounting, Adrian Alba was still living, as was his son. So in event that I was of the misguided impression that I could actually find out exactly where LHO obtained the sling/carrying strap, and that information would actually serve any purpose in clarification of the shooting event in Dealey Plaza on 11/22/63, then I could drive over to New Orleans and/or Baton Rouge and ask around.

However! Being semi-retired, I do not waste money like I did back in the late 80's/early 90's in regards to chasing non-productive knowledge which in all probability would not tell me anything even were I to actually find the answer.

LHO had no sling/carrying strap when the backyard photo's were taken.

Adrian Alba assisted LHO with work on a leather carrying strap.

The Model 91/38 Short Rifle found on the sixth floor of the TSDB contained a leather sling/carrying strap.

Mystery solved!

Hey Tom, that Adrian Alba citation is terrific!

You deserve an exclamation point and a feather for your cap for that one.

I also recently read that an editor of Gun World magazine received a letter from Oswald when in New Orleans asking about ammunition for Manlicher Carcano, a magazine Oswald most likely obtained from Alba's shop.

In addition, it seems we learn more from Alba every day.

If you can read past the bullxxxx about Amigos de Roberto, Gus Russo tells us, (p. 285, Brothers In Arms), that Oswald was known to Rice, who wasn't just any old SS agent, he was THE Special Agent In Charge - that's SAIC of the New Orleans office.

RUSSO:

Alba's lot was where the local members of the Secret Service, whose office was just across the street, parked their cars, working their counterfeit and protection details. At this point, Jack Kennedy and Lee Oswald had must three months to live, and after their deaths, Alba would become a prime witness to relevant comments made by John Rice, an agent who parked there.

It was Rice, who supposedly had struck up a friendship with Alba, who would tell Alba that before the Amigos de Roberto had gotten a whiff that Lee was a rat, they had considered him for the assassination team against Fidel. He must have been peddling himself as such, and apparently his application went as far as Bobby Kennedy's desk at Justice before Lee was exiled from the exiles.

According to Rice and an unidentified New Orleans political writer known to Alba only as "Fritz," when Bobby first saw Oswald's name come up after Jack's death and traced it back to the CRC dossiers, he was heard to yell out in his office, "I've killed my own brother!" 35

Rice's comments cannot be confirmed, but they attest to the impression some had of Lee, that he was angling to learn more about the CRC's plans agaisnt Castro and did so by trying to be hired as an assassin. Thus he many have been known to Bobby (whether by name or not) well before Lee struck at the president. Alba's testimony also amounted to the first hint, shortly after the assassination, that Bobby considered himself complicit in his brother's death."

Note 35: M. Scott Malone, PBS Frontline interview of Adrian Alba, February 27, 1993, repeated by Alba to coauthor Russo in July 1993 and Gerald Posner in 1994.

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"Now if we can only find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized, then we might be able to say we did a little research."

BK

Tom: So! Let's see if we can figure out some of this great enigma.

1. The sling/carrying strap was not on the rifle when LHO was photographed holding the weapon in the "backyard photo's".

2. The FBI questioned persons all over the Dallas area in regards to the sling, with zero results.

3. LHO, shortly after the backyard photo's, moved to New Orleans.

4. The FBI, of knowledge, questioned no one in New Orleans, relative to the sling.

5. LHO frequently talked "gun-talk" with Adrian Alba of the Crescent City Garage.

6. Adrain Alba gave testimony to the WC in regards to LHO's gun/rifle interest. He gave no testimony relative to the leather carrying strap/sling, and no questions were asked of him relative to that subject.

http://www.ajweberman.com/nodules2/nodulec14.htm

Note: The most simple place to read this. In event that one wants to read the entire content and context, might I recommend that they review what Adrian Alba had to say during the HSCA questioning.

The HSCA interviewed Alba on January 24, 1978:

""One time OSWALD came into the garage with a rifle sling and asked if he could put a rivet in a piece of leather. Alba did, using a small anvil from his shop which he still has in his possession. The piece that he put in was a light tan color and slightly wider, but not as thick as the original which, according to him, was black leather. OSWALD told him it was from his Italian rifle."

Now, at last accounting, Adrian Alba was still living, as was his son. So in event that I was of the misguided impression that I could actually find out exactly where LHO obtained the sling/carrying strap, and that information would actually serve any purpose in clarification of the shooting event in Dealey Plaza on 11/22/63, then I could drive over to New Orleans and/or Baton Rouge and ask around.

However! Being semi-retired, I do not waste money like I did back in the late 80's/early 90's in regards to chasing non-productive knowledge which in all probability would not tell me anything even were I to actually find the answer.

LHO had no sling/carrying strap when the backyard photo's were taken.

Adrian Alba assisted LHO with work on a leather carrying strap.

The Model 91/38 Short Rifle found on the sixth floor of the TSDB contained a leather sling/carrying strap.

Mystery solved!

Hey Tom, that Adrian Alba citation is terrific!

You deserve an exclamation point and a feather for your cap for that one.

I also recently read that an editor of Gun World magazine received a letter from Oswald when in New Orleans asking about ammunition for Manlicher Carcano, a magazine Oswald most likely obtained from Alba's shop.

In addition, it seems we learn more from Alba every day.

If you can read past the bullxxxx about Amigos de Roberto, Gus Russo tells us, (p. 285, Brothers In Arms), that Oswald was known to Rice, who wasn't just any old SS agent, he was THE Special Agent In Charge - that's SAIC of the New Orleans office.

RUSSO:

Alba's lot was where the local members of the Secret Service, whose office was just across the street, parked their cars, working their counterfeit and protection details. At this point, Jack Kennedy and Lee Oswald had must three months to live, and after their deaths, Alba would become a prime witness to relevant comments made by John Rice, an agent who parked there.

It was Rice, who supposedly had struck up a friendship with Alba, who would tell Alba that before the Amigos de Roberto had gotten a whiff that Lee was a rat, they had considered him for the assassination team against Fidel. He must have been peddling himself as such, and apparently his application went as far as Bobby Kennedy's desk at Justice before Lee was exiled from the exiles.

According to Rice and an unidentified New Orleans political writer known to Alba only as "Fritz," when Bobby first saw Oswald's name come up after Jack's death and traced it back to the CRC dossiers, he was heard to yell out in his office, "I've killed my own brother!" 35

Rice's comments cannot be confirmed, but they attest to the impression some had of Lee, that he was angling to learn more about the CRC's plans agaisnt Castro and did so by trying to be hired as an assassin. Thus he many have been known to Bobby (whether by name or not) well before Lee struck at the president. Alba's testimony also amounted to the first hint, shortly after the assassination, that Bobby considered himself complicit in his brother's death."

Note 35: M. Scott Malone, PBS Frontline interview of Adrian Alba, February 27, 1993, repeated by Alba to coauthor Russo in July 1993 and Gerald Posner in 1994.

"I also recently read that an editor of Gun World magazine received a letter from Oswald when in New Orleans asking about ammunition for Manlicher Carcano, a magazine Oswald most likely obtained from Alba's shop."

Since LHO ordered and received the Carcano some two months prior to even going to New Orleans and hanging out at Adrian Alba's garage, I personally have doubts that reading Alba's magazines have any bearing on Oswald's ordering of a Carcano weapon. (other than to confuse the issues)

And, in event that one accepts the "Walker Bullet" as being a factual exhibit, then it most certainly is not from an Italian Carcano round and has all of the characteristics of the WCC Carcano bullet.

Which would tend to point out that LHO/aka the Walker shooter, was in possession of WCC Carcano ammo prior to beginning to play his games with Adrian Alba.

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"Now if we can only find out where it came from, how it got on the rifle and how it was utilized, then we might be able to say we did a little research."

BK

Tom: So! Let's see if we can figure out some of this great enigma.

1. The sling/carrying strap was not on the rifle when LHO was photographed holding the weapon in the "backyard photo's".

2. The FBI questioned persons all over the Dallas area in regards to the sling, with zero results.

3. LHO, shortly after the backyard photo's, moved to New Orleans.

4. The FBI, of knowledge, questioned no one in New Orleans, relative to the sling.

5. LHO frequently talked "gun-talk" with Adrian Alba of the Crescent City Garage.

6. Adrain Alba gave testimony to the WC in regards to LHO's gun/rifle interest. He gave no testimony relative to the leather carrying strap/sling, and no questions were asked of him relative to that subject.

http://www.ajweberman.com/nodules2/nodulec14.htm

Note: The most simple place to read this. In event that one wants to read the entire content and context, might I recommend that they review what Adrian Alba had to say during the HSCA questioning.

The HSCA interviewed Alba on January 24, 1978:

""One time OSWALD came into the garage with a rifle sling and asked if he could put a rivet in a piece of leather. Alba did, using a small anvil from his shop which he still has in his possession. The piece that he put in was a light tan color and slightly wider, but not as thick as the original which, according to him, was black leather. OSWALD told him it was from his Italian rifle."

Now, at last accounting, Adrian Alba was still living, as was his son. So in event that I was of the misguided impression that I could actually find out exactly where LHO obtained the sling/carrying strap, and that information would actually serve any purpose in clarification of the shooting event in Dealey Plaza on 11/22/63, then I could drive over to New Orleans and/or Baton Rouge and ask around.

However! Being semi-retired, I do not waste money like I did back in the late 80's/early 90's in regards to chasing non-productive knowledge which in all probability would not tell me anything even were I to actually find the answer.

LHO had no sling/carrying strap when the backyard photo's were taken.

Adrian Alba assisted LHO with work on a leather carrying strap.

The Model 91/38 Short Rifle found on the sixth floor of the TSDB contained a leather sling/carrying strap.

Mystery solved!

Hey Tom, that Adrian Alba citation is terrific!

You deserve an exclamation point and a feather for your cap for that one.

I also recently read that an editor of Gun World magazine received a letter from Oswald when in New Orleans asking about ammunition for Manlicher Carcano, a magazine Oswald most likely obtained from Alba's shop.

In addition, it seems we learn more from Alba every day.

If you can read past the bullxxxx about Amigos de Roberto, Gus Russo tells us, (p. 285, Brothers In Arms), that Oswald was known to Rice, who wasn't just any old SS agent, he was THE Special Agent In Charge - that's SAIC of the New Orleans office.

RUSSO:

Alba's lot was where the local members of the Secret Service, whose office was just across the street, parked their cars, working their counterfeit and protection details. At this point, Jack Kennedy and Lee Oswald had must three months to live, and after their deaths, Alba would become a prime witness to relevant comments made by John Rice, an agent who parked there.

It was Rice, who supposedly had struck up a friendship with Alba, who would tell Alba that before the Amigos de Roberto had gotten a whiff that Lee was a rat, they had considered him for the assassination team against Fidel. He must have been peddling himself as such, and apparently his application went as far as Bobby Kennedy's desk at Justice before Lee was exiled from the exiles.

According to Rice and an unidentified New Orleans political writer known to Alba only as "Fritz," when Bobby first saw Oswald's name come up after Jack's death and traced it back to the CRC dossiers, he was heard to yell out in his office, "I've killed my own brother!" 35

Rice's comments cannot be confirmed, but they attest to the impression some had of Lee, that he was angling to learn more about the CRC's plans agaisnt Castro and did so by trying to be hired as an assassin. Thus he many have been known to Bobby (whether by name or not) well before Lee struck at the president. Alba's testimony also amounted to the first hint, shortly after the assassination, that Bobby considered himself complicit in his brother's death."

Note 35: M. Scott Malone, PBS Frontline interview of Adrian Alba, February 27, 1993, repeated by Alba to coauthor Russo in July 1993 and Gerald Posner in 1994.

Hey Tom, that Adrian Alba citation is terrific!

You deserve an exclamation point and a feather for your cap for that one.

Well now! Please make that a "pink" feather, as I would not want to be confused with the great "White Feather" who has slung so much BS in regards to the operational ability of the Carcano as well as the great difficulty of the Dealey Plaza shots.

In addition, it seems we learn more from Alba every day.

If, and when one learns more, then they just may come to understand why LHO "targeted" him in attempt to get Alba to sell him one of his already owned weapons, or else order a weapon for him.

P.S. Relative to the issue or not, Adrian Alba has direct family relations to a WWII Army Air Corps Officer/B17 (Navigator) who was shot down over Germany and served some 11 months as a POW in a German POW Camp prior to being released by Patton's advancing forces.

Kind of makes one wonder if there is a "family" connection to the WWII Army Air Corps shoulder holster strap which Alba assisted LHO in placement on the Carcano.

And, although yet to be completely followed up on, there was an "Oswald Alba" who was born in Louisiana, lived in New Orleans, and who ultimately moved back over into the Waveland, MS area of Hancock County, MS where he died.

This is of course the same general location where Marguerite Oswald along with many others from the New Orleans area visited for beach recreation as well as being relatively close to Harrison County, MS where LHO's grandfather and grandmother had lived and were married.

Lastly, you just may be getting far closer to some of the answers than even you are aware.

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