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Sam Pate


Guest Bart Kamp
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Incredible.  Tons of info in there.  I used to listen to KLIF and KBOX in the late 60's, remember Ron McAllister's news casts.  It's going to take me a while to digest.  Busy the next few days.  Several points of discussion though in a quick read.  Muchas Gracias! 

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More ClPix and KBox stuff

 

Hard to read at times, best is to open the image in new tab and enlarge as such.
Fascinating stuff.
 
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Just getting started re reading.  Love Field is referred to left field twice? The recorder of the event doesn't hear clearly?  "Why I wanted to cover this motorcade because Numerous types of pamphlets put out about Kennedy wanted for Treason in the Oak lawn area around Lemon one and a half weeks before the assassination...

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HSCA Final Report, 1/2/79 (pg. 65-66)

The Warren Commission had also employed scientific analysis in its investigation and had recognized that acoustics might be used to resolve some questions about the shots fired at the President. It had obtained a tape recording, an alleged on-the-scene account of the assassination made by Sam Pate, a Dallas radio newsman, but an FBI examination of the tape "failed to indicate the presence of any sounds which could be interpreted as gunshots." The FBI also informed the Commission that the newsman had stated that most of the tape was not recorded in Dealey Plaza at the time of the assassination, but was recorded in a studio several days later after he had been dismissed by his station, KBOX.
The Commission independently submitted the tape for analysis to Dr. Lawrence Kersta of Bell Telephone Acoustics & Speech Research Laboratory. As reported in a letter from Kersta to the Commission on July 17, 1964, spectograms (visual representations of tonal qualities in the sounds) were made of a key 8-second portion of the tape. The spectograms indicated there were six nonvoiced noises - one nonvoiced "spike" (a scientific term for a graphic display of a noise) followed by three other nonvoiced spikes of different acoustical characteristics occurring .86 seconds, 1.035 seconds and 1.385 seconds after the first. These, in turn, were followed by two events apparently caused by sound and believed to have been related to the previous ones. Dr. Kersta did not indicate in his letter that he had found shots, and the results of his tests were not mentioned in the Warren Report.
The committee was unable to locate the Kersta spectographs in the National Archives until late 1978 (they had been misfiled), but it did obtain the tape recording made on November 22, 1963, by KBOX reporter Sam Pate. On May 11, 1978, the committee submitted the tape to an acoustical consultant for analysis, with these results:
While a portion of the tape was recorded on November 22, 1963, in the vicinity of Dealey Plaza, it was thought not to be contemporaneous with the assassination. Other portions of the tape, moreover, seemed to have been recorded, at least in large part, in a studio, since appropriate background noise was not present.
And even if the tape had been made during the firing of the shots and had recorded them, Kersta's spectographic analysis would not have found them. The committee's consultant advised that spectographic analysis is appropriate only for detecting tonal, or harmonic, sound. To identify a gunshot, the analysis must be able to portray a waveform on an oscilloscope or similar such device.

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This is fascinating. Putting a spin on the HSCA commentary. No comments are recorded by the two bodies who analysed the dictabelt to compare findings. If some parts of the recording are not from DP then some are. The fact that the Kersta spectrograph was miss-filed (or least failed to appear) until late in the day is also suspicious. Has Donald Thomas made any comments in this potential evidence? 

The analysis above, by a person listening to a record bears no relation to the HSCA analysis. The analyser can clearly hear shotlike sounds and distinguishes three. Kersta's analysis (or the summary) is written as if nothing was confidently distinguished. Looks like a smokescreen. 

Edited by Eddy Bainbridge
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21 hours ago, Josh Cron said:

 

Thanks to Josh Cron for posting this. The record runs in chronological order pretty much and the likely important piece starts at 6.50. I can see that it is difficult to ascertain whether or not the announcer is at DP or whether information is being rapidly relayed to him. His commentary is stilted and some noises apart from his voice can be discerned. Is there anyone who is willing to give a judgment on this bearing in mind the information posted by Bart Kamp posted above, perhaps by using the timings provided?

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