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Robert Burrows

Gerald Posner on Murder Most Foul

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1 hour ago, David Andrews said:

'The Lee Oswald Talking Blues," only available on bootleg.

 

Yeah, that or something similar is a better title, since there's really no tune.

 

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Posted (edited)

Here's my song concept for Gerald Posner-- sung to the tune of, "Blowing in the Wind."

 

BLOWING OUT YOUR SHORTS

How many lies must a Lone Nutter tell, before you call him a l-i-a-r ?

How many clues must he refuse to peruse, before we say his pants are on fire?

Yes'n how many times must the witnesses die, before we say they conspired?

The answer, old sports, is blowing out your shorts.

The answer is blowing out your shorts.

Edited by W. Niederhut

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Second verse...

 

How many times must the Zapruder film roll, before we admit it was a plot?

How many fake books must Bugliosi pen, before we admit he was a sot?

Yes'n how many payoffs must the major networks bank, before we admit that they were bought?

The answer, old sports, is blowing out your shorts.

The answer is blowing out your shorts.

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49 minutes ago, W. Niederhut said:

Second verse...

 

How many times must the Zapruder film roll, before we admit it was a plot?

How many fake books must Bugliosi pen, before we admit he was a sot?

Yes'n how many payoffs must the major networks bank, before we admit that they were bought?

The answer, old sports, is blowing out your shorts.

The answer is blowing out your shorts.

I remember reading somewhere long ago that Dylan stole "Blowin' in the Wind" from somebody. Have you ever heard that or know anything about it?

 

 

 

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50 minutes ago, Ron Ecker said:

I remember reading somewhere long ago that Dylan stole "Blowin' in the Wind" from somebody. Have you ever heard that or know anything about it?

Never heard that one.

Dave Van Ronk complained that Dylan used his arrangement of "House of the Rising Sun" on his original Columbia album.

You may be thinking of that story.

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2 minutes ago, W. Niederhut said:

Never heard that one.

Dave Van Ronk complained that Dylan used his arrangement of "House of the Rising Sun" on his original Columbia album.

You may be thinking of that story.

I pretty sure it was "Blowin' in the Wind."

Dave Van Ronk? Who did he steal that name from?

 

 

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How about this? Oswald sings "Man in the Doorway" (Lovelady) (or it could be "Prayer Man" too) to the tune of "It Ain't Me, Babe."

Go 'way from the front steps
Leave at your own chosen speed
I'm not the man in the doorway
I'm not the one that you see.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, Ron Ecker said:

I pretty sure it was "Blowin' in the Wind."

 

The melody of "Blowin' in the Wind" is indebted to the African-American traditional "No More Auction Block."  After "Blowin'" became an influential hit record, some rumor was spread that Dylan stole the lyrics from poetry a high school kid sent in a fan letter, but this is probably jealousy.  Everybody hates it when you write a simple lyric that becomes a moneymaker; they think they could have, and should have, done it first, instead of the complex and off-putting sh*t they were trying to put over.  (The "Salieri Complex.")

For one thing, Dylan probably didn't have high school-aged fans until after "Blowin' in the Wind"was released.

Bob and Odetta were friends on the folk scene, and helped each other's careers at various stages.  "Auction Block" was as big an influence on "We Shall Overcome" as on "Blowin'."

Edited by David Andrews

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5 minutes ago, David Andrews said:

The melody of "Blowin' in the Wind" is indebted to the African-American traditional "No More Auction Block."  After "Blowin'" became an influential hit record, some rumor was spread that Dylan stole the lyrics from poetry a high school kid sent in a fan letter, but this is probably jealousy.  Everybody hates it when you write a simple lyric that becomes a moneymaker; they think they could have, and should have, done it first, instead of the complex and off-putting sh*t they were trying to put over.  (The "Salieri Complex.")

For one thing, Dylan probably didn't have high school-aged fans until after "Blowin' in the Wind"was released.

Bob and Odetta were friends on the folk scene, and helped each other's careers at various stages.

Thanks. That rumor is probably what I remember.

 

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Posted (edited)

FYI, fans, here are a couple possible reasons why Dylan beat on Weberman:

Weberman is said to have claimed that he found drug paraphernalia in Dylan's garbage.  Imagine the worst kind of that, and you'll be right, at least per Weberman's claim.  He may have gone dumpster diving out of exactly that research interest.  This is all popular rumor from the period.

Dylan and wife Sara had moved back to Greenwich Village after his retreat in Woodstock due to his motorcycle injury.  (Some say that the circumstances mentioned above were also in play.)  In Woodstock, Bob's reclusiveness led fans to invade his property; Dylan called the sheriff out there several times.  Once, he and Sara came home to find a strange couple making love in their living room.  So, when Weberman came a-diggin' in lower Manhattan, Sara was probably outraged.  (In assaulting Weberman, Dylan allegedly told him to leave his wife alone.)  It was also a bad precedent that could have attracted G-men to do the same thing, in those Vietnam protest, COINTELPRO days.

Edited by David Andrews

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Hey William, the way you are going you might as well crank up the electric guitar and put your group back together.

Murder Most Foul II from the Rockies.

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More on Dylan. He had a supporting role in the Western "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (and sang "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" and some other song on the sound track). I remember reading (again I'm operating on faded memories) that Dylan was originally meant to play the lead role of Billy the Kid. It's a shame he didn't get to do it. He looked the part, far more than Kris Kristofferson, who a critic rightly observed looked entirely too well fed to be Billy the Kid.

 

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, Ron Ecker said:

More on Dylan. He had a supporting role in the Western "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (and sang "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" and some other song on the sound track). I remember reading (again I'm operating on faded memories) that Dylan was originally meant to play the lead role of Billy the Kid. It's a shame he didn't get to do it. He looked the part, far more than Kris Kristofferson, who a critic rightly observed looked entirely too well fed to be Billy the Kid.

 

It's the other way around.  The studio forced Kristofferson's rebel hotness on director Sam Peckinpah.  Kristoferson ingratiated himself with Sam, then brought Dylan to Peckinpah's house to play some songs for a possible soundtrack.  Sam had no idea who Dylan was, but took him on as actor and composer once he researched Bob's reputation and sellability. 

That's a greatly underrated movie, which is only now getting its critical due as an anti-capitalist work.  Look for the 2-DVD edition, which has Peckinpah's cut and the studio's cut.

Kristofferson was working a a janitor at Columbia Records' Nashville studio while Dylan was recording Blonde on Blonde, and emptied the ashtrays without once introducing himself.

Katy Jurado sees Slim Pickens to Heaven's Door, after capitalism makes all old friends fall out.

Edited by David Andrews

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3 minutes ago, David Andrews said:

It's the other way around.  The studio forced Kristofferson on director Sam Peckinpah, and Kristoferson brought Dylan to Peckinpah's house to play some songs for a possible soundtrack.  Sam had no idea who Dylan was, but took him on as actor and composer.  That's a greatly underrated movie, which is only now getting its critical due as an anti-capitalist work.  Look for the 2-DVD edition, which has Peckinpah's cut and the studio's cut.

Peckinpah didn't know who Dylan was? Well at least he should have noticed, "This guy looks like Billy the Kid."

 

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