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John

A few years back I corresponded with several people who had met Walker as children when he visited their homes.

Since this story makes reference to events at Little Rock and tells of visits to Arkansas in the post assassination attempt time period I might offer just a few thoughts.

While in Little Rock Walker was actually (surprising in some ways) welcomed as a War Hero type celebrity in society there. He was touted as a very eligible bachelor and seems to have participated regularly on the social circuit.

Following Walker's resignation from the military I believe it was the Little Rock Chamber of Commerce that issued a proclamation of support for Walker that I have a copy of somewhere in my files. It seems Walker left the Arkansas area with many friends and associates.

Might point out that at the time of the assassination attempt on Walker he had been banned from travel to Canada where he had previously been a frequent visitor. Walker seems to have enjoyed "dropping in" on former comrades in arms and associates and seems to have had many visitors to his home as well.

The small game hunting seems to have been something Walker enjoyed from his youth in Kerr County, Texas.

Jim Root

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John

A few years back I corresponded with several people who had met Walker as children when he visited their homes.

Since this story makes reference to events at Little Rock and tells of visits to Arkansas in the post assassination attempt time period I might offer just a few thoughts.

While in Little Rock Walker was actually (surprising in some ways) welcomed as a War Hero type celebrity in society there. He was touted as a very eligible bachelor and seems to have participated regularly on the social circuit.

Following Walker's resignation from the military I believe it was the Little Rock Chamber of Commerce that issued a proclamation of support for Walker that I have a copy of somewhere in my files. It seems Walker left the Arkansas area with many friends and associates.

Might point out that at the time of the assassination attempt on Walker he had been banned from travel to Canada where he had previously been a frequent visitor. Walker seems to have enjoyed "dropping in" on former comrades in arms and associates and seems to have had many visitors to his home as well.

The small game hunting seems to have been something Walker enjoyed from his youth in Kerr County, Texas.

Jim Root

Jim, your thread deserves to be revived. General Edwin Walker was involved in several of the key events of the Cold War in the domestic USA, including the Little Rock, Arkansas implementation of the Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education legislation to racially integrate all public schools in the USA, signed by Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren, which earned Warren the hatred of the extreme right wing, especially in the South.

General Edwin Walker complied with Eisenhower's demand that he lead troops to force Arkansas to integrate their local high school -- and he delivered a fine speech for the occasion. But his heart was torn by this event, and it was this, perhaps more than anything, that led him to resent the Federal Government for the rest of his life.

In 1961, with JFK as President, Walker implemented his compulsory right-wing reading program for the 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany, call the Pro-Blue (implying anti-Red) program. Some of this literature came from the Billy James Hargis segregationist Christian Crusade, and some came from the John Birch Society, both sources inspired by Joe McCarthy, and both insulted JFK, calling him a Communist.

The John Birch Society was solidly aligned with the White Citizens' Councils of the South that condemned compulsory race integration for public schools -- showing that General Walker had a firm change of heart and would never again integrate a public school against their will.

JFK mildly admonished Walker for this pecadillo, and offered him a promotion if he would move to Hawaii. Instead, General Walker resigned from the Army, being the only US General in the 20th century to resign, thus giving up his $12,000 a year pension (which is $120,000 in today's dollars).

Clearly, Walker was hopping mad. But more to the point, Walker had dreams of entering politics and toppling JFK. With what money? Most likely, with the money of H.L. Hunt.

When Walker quit the Army in late November, 1961, he made the December, 1961 cover of NEWSWEEK as the 'voice of the right-wing extremists.'

To earn his money, he quickly began writing speeches. His new office was in a Dallas skyscraper belonging to one of Dallas' many oil companies. Would we be surprised to learn that H.L. Hunt was his sponsor?

When General Walker came out of his office in early 1962 he delivered an hour-long speech in Dallas that Joe McCarthy might have been proud of, with all the JBS overtones of accusing the White House of a Communist Conspiracy. He earned ten standing ovations -- one every six minutes.

At the end of his very first speech, the NIC (National Indignation Committee) gave Walker a big celebration, and he was awarded a Stetson hat by Dallas Mayor Earle Cabell. (I include that video below.)

This was only the start of Walker's "coming out". Later in 1962 he tried to reverse his humiliating performance under Eisenhower. This time it was Oxford University in Mississippi that was ordered to accept a qualifying application by a Negro (James Meredith). JFK vowed to enforce the Supreme Court order to integrate Oxford (Ole Miss) and Mississippi Ross Barnett defied JFK head-on.

So General Edwin Walker got on national radio in late September 1962, and called for thousands of protestors "from every State in the Union" to oppose JFK's use of Federal Troops in this alleged violation of State's Rights. Should they bring their guns? Walker replied, "That's up to them!"

Walker knew he was addressing radical militia and the paramilitary Minutemen in many States, especially in the South. Actually, thousands did show up in Jackson, Mississippi for this mass protest.

The short story is that the protests turned into riots, where two were killed and perhaps a hundred were wounded. It was no surprise when RFK ordered that Walker be arrested for insurrection and contempt of Court.

However, in a horrible political blunder, RFK also ordered Walker to be detained for psychiatric examination. At this point, the eminent psychiatrist, Thomas Szasz (THE MYTH OF MENTAL ILLNESS, 1960) loudly protested this abuse of science in the service of political partisanship! Even the ACLU joined this protest by Szasz, what to speak of the extreme right-wing paranoia over RFK's blunder.

The short story is that RFK had to release Walker immediately, and within a few weeks all charges against Walker were dropped! The JFK Administration all but apologized for their blunder.

There is more -- much more -- about this colorful American General who is worthy of at least a monograph on his biography. But none exists, yet.

On that score, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) possesses perhaps seven sound recordings of extended interviews of eye-witnesses to the Oxford riots -- yet they would not release copies to me when I requested them in the first few days of this month.

Instead, they said, these sound recordings (which are now a half-century old) must endure another Security Screening before the American public can hear them again.

So, I formally requested an official Security Screening, and am now currently awaiting the NARA response.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo, MA

<edit typos>

P.S. Here is the video of Walker receiving an award after his very first McCarthyist speech:

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Guest Robert Morrow

Paul, I think you are putting up some great information on Edwin Walker. I am definitely in the H.L. Hunt killed JFK camp. I can't put Walker in there because he contacted the HSCA over the bullet issue.

Remember, Gen. Edward Lansdale was photographed at TSBD. He is a JFK killer.

GHW Bush has said that he can't remember where he was on 11/22/63 despite being a US Senate candidate in Dallas on 11/22/63.(And 11/21/63).

J. Edgar Hoover started covering up the JFK assassination immediately.

McGeorge Bundy who was running the White House Situation Room on 11/22/63 immediately was promoting the lone nutter theory. That is not a reasonable thing to do.

CIA David Atlee Phillips has said before his death that US intelligence officers were likely involved in the JFK assassination (he was in it, I would call that a limited hang out).

E. Howard Hunt said he was a "backbencher" in the JFK assassination.

CIA David Morales has said "we got that bastard" in Dallas.

LBJ told Madeleine Brown it was Texas oil men and renegade intelligence bastards who killed JFK.

Cord Meyer admitted there was a conspiracy to kill JFK.

James Angleton told Sy Hersh that a "mansion has many rooms" ... but pretty much that HE did not kill JFK. Blame some one else at Langley he says.

Allen Dulles said "That little Kennedy ... he thought he was God."

Gen. Edwin Walker fits the perfect demographic profile for a murderer of JFK, but because of that letter to the HSCA I can't put him in there.

Just like I can't put John McCoy in as a plotter because he asked for subpeana power for the Warren Commission. You don't do that if you are a plotter.

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Found a mention of Gen. Edwin Walker in one of the earliest news reports of the assassination.

The Detroit News Paper of Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 was probably going to the presses or very close to that when the story broke out of Dallas. You can tell the Headline and story were a last minute change because the paper only devotes one column to the assassination on the front page, and then adds a few more paragraphs to complete the short story on Page 2.

The article is written by Chief of the Washington Bureau, J. F. Ter Horst.

It was written sometime after the rifle had been found in the TSBD which happened about 1:22 CST (2:22 EST). But there is no mention of the Tippit slaying or of Oswald, so the article was created approximately between 1:30 - 2:00, Dallas time.

It is also apparent that the story was created from the first reports coming over the wire and phone from Dallas, some of them inaccurate.

Some items mentioned in the article:

JFK was shot once in the head by a hidden assassin [singular] with a high powered rifle.

Connally was shot in the head and the wrist by the same "fusillade" that ended Kennedy's life.

LBJ had not yet been sworn in.

Police found a foreign made rifle. Sheriff's Officers were questioning a young man picked up at the scene.

Deputy Police Chief M. W. Stevenson said there were " three shots, maybe four".

"The President was struck by a bullet that must have come from a .30 caliber rifle, the kind used by soldiers and deer hunters"

The article ends with the portion that pertains to this thread:

"... Mr. Kennedy was to have spoken out against the radical right wing at the trade mart. He had planned to accuse the radical right wing of substituting hysteria for national policy.

Dallas is the home of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, who is acknowledged here as the leader of the radical right wing in Texas, and one of the rightest leaders of the South."

Another item of interest on page two, a couple columns over from the ending of the JFK article:

Nixon Gets Silent Reminder of Defeat

Dallas, Nov. 22, (UPI)

Former Vice President Nixon left silently for New York today, only a few hours before the man who beat him in the 1960 presidential race came to town. There were no newsmen waiting to talk to him when he arrived at Dallas' Love Field. He walked through a crowd that was gathering to see President Kennedy.

One more item:

Page 3 shows a national weather map that shows a cold front had either just passed or was just approaching the Dallas area.

Note: Unable to upload graphic of front page. File size too big.

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"... Mr. Kennedy was to have spoken out against the radical right wing at the trade mart. He had planned to accuse the radical right wing of substituting hysteria for national policy.

Dallas is the home of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, who is acknowledged here as the leader of the radical right wing in Texas, and one of the rightest leaders of the South."

- is an interesting bit. Walker was relieved precicely for expressing his ideas that could be taken as foreign policy being counter to an executive order. So, if that's so, here we have Kennedy clearly, or at least seen as such by Walker, attacking Walker, again. Walker must have by now really been hating Kennedy, and he knew others knew he did to wit his ensuring the pilots taking him to Shreveport signed his ticket when the news came. Gotta have an iron clad alibi.

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Paul, I think you are putting up some great information on Edwin Walker. I am definitely in the H.L. Hunt killed JFK camp. I can't put Walker in there because he contacted the HSCA over the bullet issue.

Remember, Gen. Edward Lansdale was photographed at TSBD. He is a JFK killer.

GHW Bush has said that he can't remember where he was on 11/22/63 despite being a US Senate candidate in Dallas on 11/22/63.(And 11/21/63).

J. Edgar Hoover started covering up the JFK assassination immediately.

McGeorge Bundy who was running the White House Situation Room on 11/22/63 immediately was promoting the lone nutter theory. That is not a reasonable thing to do.

CIA David Atlee Phillips has said before his death that US intelligence officers were likely involved in the JFK assassination (he was in it, I would call that a limited hang out).

E. Howard Hunt said he was a "backbencher" in the JFK assassination.

CIA David Morales has said "we got that bastard" in Dallas.

LBJ told Madeleine Brown it was Texas oil men and renegade intelligence bastards who killed JFK.

Cord Meyer admitted there was a conspiracy to kill JFK.

James Angleton told Sy Hersh that a "mansion has many rooms" ... but pretty much that HE did not kill JFK. Blame some one else at Langley he says.

Allen Dulles said "That little Kennedy ... he thought he was God."

Gen. Edwin Walker fits the perfect demographic profile for a murderer of JFK, but because of that letter to the HSCA I can't put him in there.

Just like I can't put John McCoy in as a plotter because he asked for subpeana power for the Warren Commission. You don't do that if you are a plotter.

Robert, it is somewhat arbitrary to place more blame on people who were present in Dallas on 11/22/1963, compared with those who were not in Dallas that day.

While it is true that General Edwin Walker was not in Dallas on 11/22/1963 because he left town the night before to make a speech in Louisiana, we should consider his role in the attack on Adlai Stevenson on 10/24/1963.

General Walker did not attend the "UN Day" rally led by Adlai Stevenson, but perhaps 100 of his followers did attend. In addition to little old ladies in tennis shoes, these followers of Edwin Walker were largely extremists from the Young Americans for Freedom, led by Larrie Schmidt. The night before, on 10/23/1963, Edwin Walker held his own "US Day" rally to whip up his followers to disrupt Adlai Stevenson's speech at all costs.

The crowd (or mob) was given complete instructions by Walker -- to buy all the tickets they could afford, to take noisemaker toys, to bring megaphones, to make their own speeches, to hiss, boo and throw tomatoes...all of which were carried out with regimented precision.

In other words, although General Walker was not at the Adlai Stevenson rally himself, his intructions were being carried out at that rally 100%.

Furthermore, just because General Landsdale happened to be at the Texas School Book Depository with police following the shooting of JFK, this is in itself insufficient proof that he was personally involved in a conspiracy to kill JFK. I admit it looks suspicious, but final proof is lacking.

In other words, based on previous behavior I find General Walker to be much more suspicious than General Landsdale. Hatred is simply not enough evidence of a conspiracy. Behavior is the only proper evidence in a case as serious as this.

The fact that GHW Bush said that he can't remember where he was on 11/22/63 cannot be used to prove anything at all.

The fact that J. Edgar Hoover started covering up the JFK assassination immediately is behavioral evidence that J. Edgar Hoover had foreknowledge of a plot to kill Kennedy. McKnight showed that Hoover had this knowledge as early as August, 1963, when he learned that Carlos Marcello put up a lot of money to kill JFK.

McGeorge Bundy was following the lead of J. Edgar Hoover in promoting the Lone Nut theory. That is suspicious, but it is not proof he knew all the facts.

Although CIA Agent David Atlee Phillips said before his death that US intelligence officers were likely involved in the JFK assassination, that is not enough evidence to name names. Were these rogue contractors like Frank Sturgis? Were these employees like Cord Meyer?

Although E. Howard Hunt admitted to being a "backbencher" in the JFK assassination, this only means that he heard something from somebody, and this could have been mere rumor. The only names he offered were LBJ (who had no knowledge of details, according even to those who accuse him of 'masterminding' the full conspiracy), and Cord Meyer, whose wife had a love affair with JFK.

Although CIA Agent David Morales said "we got that bastard" in Dallas, that is proof of nothing at all. Perhaps ten thousand right-wing fanatics said exactly the same thing! I agree that David Morales is suspicious, and truly hated JFK, but that in itself cannot be admitted as proof.

Although LBJ told Madeleine Brown that Texas oil men and renegade intelligence bastards killed JFK, he was emotional and talking with his mistress. That cannot be used as hard evidence. Furthermore, it is unreasonable, because renegade CIA contractors have zero power to cover-up anything. Only a higher power could do that. (Nor does a Vice President have that kind of power. Nor even the richest oil men in America; the only people with the necessary power to mastermind a coverup of such gargantuan proportions, and maintain it for a half-century, are far more powerful.) I have no doubt that oil barons were involved, and that H.L. Hunt is most suspicious, but without full support from the FULL military-industrial complex, we cannot explain the enormity of the cover-up.

Although Cord Meyer admitted there was a conspiracy to kill JFK, that proves very little. Actually, there were dozens of conspiracies to kill JFK, and we are aware of many of them -- from the Mafia, from Cuban Exiles, from Joseph Milteer. The question is, which one of the many conspiracies actually succeeded?

Although James Jesus Angleton told Sy Hersh that a "mansion has many rooms" and to "blame someone else at Langley", this is very little to go on.

Although Allen Dulles said "That little Kennedy...thought he was God," that is merely another of the countless expressions of hate we find for JFK, and that cannot be accepted as proof of anything else but that JFK was widely hated -- which we already knew.

Although General Edwin Walker wrote a letter to the HSCA mocking them because the bullet fragment he retrieved from his living room wall did not match the bullet fragment they entered into HSCA evidence, this alone cannot absolve him. Walker was not afraid of anybody; not Hoover, not Dulles, not the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and certainly not Earl Warren.

General Edwin Walker, from 11/23/1963 until 11/23/1991, told every outlet, newspaper and US Government official who would listen to him, that Oswald was only one of two shooters at his home on 4/10/1963, and that the other shooter, along with Oswald, was hired by Robert F. Kennedy. Walker believed, firmly, that RFK plotted to kill him. RFK had placed Walker in an insane asylum in early October, 1962, and Walker neither forgot nor forgave that insult. Walker's paranoia against RFK was sufficient to justify any risk.

If Edwin Walker was the center-point of the Dallas conspiracy to assassinate JFK, I have little doubt that H.L. Hunt was his bankroller, because H.L. Hunt was Walker's bankroller when Walker resigned from the Army after 30 years of loyal service -- resigned without a pension. Hunt had high hopes for Walker from 1961-1962, but even H.L. Hunt could not support the man who was widely regarded as the instigator of the Ole Miss riots of 1962. Hunt stopped supporting Walker for public office about that time, but he continued his personal relationship with Walker, according to Hunt's own personal aide.

My theory does not openly accuse Walker of the JFK conspiracy -- but rather attempts to disprove that Walker was involved at the center. I have not been able to disprove it, and the fact that Walker wrote a letter to the HCSA does not in the slightest prove that Walker is absolved.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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"... Mr. Kennedy was to have spoken out against the radical right wing at the trade mart. He had planned to accuse the radical right wing of substituting hysteria for national policy.

Dallas is the home of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, who is acknowledged here as the leader of the radical right wing in Texas, and one of the rightest leaders of the South."

- is an interesting bit. Walker was relieved precicely for expressing his ideas that could be taken as foreign policy being counter to an executive order. So, if that's so, here we have Kennedy clearly, or at least seen as such by Walker, attacking Walker, again. Walker must have by now really been hating Kennedy, and he knew others knew he did to wit his ensuring the pilots taking him to Shreveport signed his ticket when the news came. Gotta have an iron clad alibi.

John, if you look at the text of the unspoken Trade Mart speech, JFK does touch upon the above themes, but does so in a very general way.

http://smu.edu/smune.../speechtext.asp

The portion of the speech that deals with "dissident voices":

"... This link between leadership and learning is not only essential at the community level. It is even more indispensable in world affairs. Ignorance and misinformation can handicap the progress of a city or a company, but they can, if allowed to prevail in foreign policy, handicap this country's security. In a world of complex and continuing problems, in a world full of frustrations and irritations, America's leadership must be guided by the lights of learning and reason or else those who confuse rhetoric with reality and the plausible with the possible will gain the popular ascendancy with their seemingly swift and simple solutions to every world problem.There will always be dissident voices heard in the land, expressing opposition without alternatives, finding fault but never favor, perceiving gloom on every side and seeking influence without responsibility. Those voices are inevitable.

But today other voices are heard in the land -- voices preaching doctrines wholly unrelated to reality, wholly unsuited to the sixties, doctrines which apparently assume that words will suffice without weapons, that vituperation is as good as victory and that peace is a sign of weakness. At a time when the national debt is steadily being reduced in terms of its burden on our economy, they see that debt as the greatest single threat to our security. At a time when we are steadily reducing the number of Federal employees serving every thousand citizens, they fear those supposed hordes of civil servants far more than the actual hordes of opposing armies.

We cannot expect that everyone, to use the phrase of a decade ago, will "talk sense to the American people." But we can hope that fewer people will listen to nonsense. And the notion that this Nation is headed for defeat through deficit, or that strength is but a matter of slogans, is nothing but just plain nonsense. ..."

Although the message of the speech is clear, JFK never mentions Gen. Walker by name, and also does not make any reference to the "radical right" or "radical right wing" in the text of the speech. That makes me wonder why the author of the News article would specifically name Walker and his right wing affiliates as the target. And finishing the article on the assassination with the Walker reference could be seen as an attempt to link Walker to the assassination in the public's mind.

So the next question would be, did J. F. Ter Horst insert the Walker reference himself, or was it something he got from another source?

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...Although the message of the speech is clear, JFK never mentions Gen. Walker by name, and also does not make any reference to the "radical right" or "radical right wing" in the text of the speech. That makes me wonder why the author of the News article would specifically name Walker and his right wing affiliates as the target...

It's a good question, Richard. I personally believe the writer justified his presumption with this sentence: "Dallas is the home of Major General Edwin A. Walker, who is acknowledged here as the leader of the radical right wing in Texas, and one of the rightest leaders of the South."

Since this was about 50 years ago, it is difficuilt for us today to recollect how popular General Walker was in the South, and especially in Texas. His face was on the cover of NEWSWEEK in December, 1961. He appeared on radio and television in the South. After he resigned from the Army, he recieved thousands of letters from admiring fans, sending him small amounts of cash. (Hundreds of these letters are on display in the Briscoe Center for American History, in the Edwin Walker archives.)

One of the great right-wing radio hosts of 1962/1963 (segregationist preacher Reverend Billy James Hargis) would take General Walker with him on national speaking tours.

I believe that the clearest view that we today might obtain of General Edwin Walker is found in the 1962 movie, SEVEN DAYS IN MAY, starring Burt Lancaster. It is the story of a General who disagrees so much with the White House that he goes on radio and tours making speeches and filling auditoriums with his extreme rightist audiences. He is supported directly by sycophants and not a few followers among the military Brass.

Edwin Walker was so well-known in Texas, and had written so many critical articles about the JFK administration, that JFK's words would have been immediately understood by the majority of Texans to imply General Walker, just as the writer suggests.

I don't believe J.F. Ter Horst was attemping to implant some foreign idea; I believe he spoke directly to the Zeitgeist of Texas in 1963.

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Guest Tom Scully

Found a mention of Gen. Edwin Walker in one of the earliest news reports of the assassination.

The Detroit News Paper of Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 was probably going to the presses or very close to that when the story broke out of Dallas. You can tell the Headline and story were a last minute change because the paper only devotes one column to the assassination on the front page, and then adds a few more paragraphs to complete the short story on Page 2.

The article is written by Chief of the Washington Bureau, J. F. Ter Horst.

It was written sometime after the rifle had been found in the TSBD which happened about 1:22 CST (2:22 EST). But there is no mention of the Tippit slaying or of Oswald, so the article was created approximately between 1:30 - 2:00, Dallas time.

It is also apparent that the story was created from the first reports coming over the wire and phone from Dallas, some of them inaccurate.

Some items mentioned in the article:

JFK was shot once in the head by a hidden assassin [singular] with a high powered rifle.

Connally was shot in the head and the wrist by the same "fusillade" that ended Kennedy's life.

LBJ had not yet been sworn in.

Police found a foreign made rifle. Sheriff's Officers were questioning a young man picked up at the scene.

Deputy Police Chief M. W. Stevenson said there were " three shots, maybe four".

"The President was struck by a bullet that must have come from a .30 caliber rifle, the kind used by soldiers and deer hunters"

The article ends with the portion that pertains to this thread:

"... Mr. Kennedy was to have spoken out against the radical right wing at the trade mart. He had planned to accuse the radical right wing of substituting hysteria for national policy.

Dallas is the home of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, who is acknowledged here as the leader of the radical right wing in Texas, and one of the rightest leaders of the South."

......

From the POV if the spin the press puts on news distribution, it seems logical the circumstances related to the recent Adlai Stevenson, "visit" to Dallas would be considered by news wire and major news outlet editors and reporters as a set up or prequel to the unfolding news reports of the shooting of President Kennedy in Dallas.

Quickly treating the shooting during Kennedy's appearance in Dallas as a sequel to Stevenson's recent visit could have been done at news desks in New York.

It may not be significant that early reports mentioned Edwin Walker. It may have simply been members of the press corps lacing their reporting with speculation of who could have despised JFK and his politics enough to shoot him.

http://www.google.com/search?q=adlai+stevenson+edwin+walker&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:unofficial&client=firefox-nightly#q=adlai+stevenson+edwin+walker&hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-nightly&hs=wvF&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:unofficial&tbm=nws&prmd=imvnsob&source=lnt&tbs=cdr:1,cd_min:1963,cd_max:1963&sa=X&psj=1&ei=ladCT-bDF8exgwf276yeCA&ved=0CA8QpwUoBg&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=71d0e90127da98bc&biw=1440&bih=695

Stevenson Is Mobbed After Dallas Speech .Un Ambassador...

Beaver Country Times - Oct 25, 1963

DALLAS — Adlai Stevenson, US ambassador to -the United Nations, gave an optimistic view of ... Edwin Walker's following and the John Birchers,' Jack Goren, ...

Stevenson Booed and Hit By Dallas...‎ New York Times ($3.95)

Texas Mob Insults Adlai .‎ Deseret News

all 69 news articles »

Flies Distress Si Final .

St. Joseph News-Press - Nov 1, 1963

Edwin Walker flew a group of American flags upside down in front of his home in ... apologies for abuse given United Nations Am' assador Adlai Stevenson in ...

Reports Place Oswald at Rally for Stevenson

Sights Which Was Assassinate .

News And Courier - Nov 23, 1963

... where United Nations Ambassador Adlai Stevenson was spat upon and hit last month; in the same state Former Maj. Gen. Edwin Walker of the lunatic fringe ...

Who's To Blame? .‎ Telegraph-Herald

all 4 news articles »

Dallas; For Disgrace By .Mil .Sosin .

Miami News - Nov 24, 1963

... Ambassador Adlai Stevenson was spat upon last month; in the same state that former Major Gen. Edwin Walker of the lunatic fringe Right Wing calls home; ...

Jfk's Critics Sowed Discord .

Kennedy Stifles Stiffer Civil Rights Bill

Pay-Per-View -

Hartford Courant - Oct 27, 1963

In Dallas, Texas, United Nations Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson had to fight his ... Edwin Walker. He said they "had disgraced Dallas and the good manners of ..

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b.

Thank you, Bernice Moore, for these outstanding images from the historical period in question.

I'm especially impressed by the newspaper clippings you found that identify General Walker and the JBS as key players in the attack on Adlai Stevenson on 10/24/1963.

I would point out the American flag flying upside-down in front of Edwin Walker's home in Dallas. This was a deliberate act on the part of General Walker, who flew his American flag upside-down to protest the policies of the JFK Administration, as well as the general direction of USA politics, e.g. the existence of the United Nations on American soil, the Supreme Court ruling that segregated schools are Unconsititutional, the tolerance of Cuba as a Communist nation only a few miles from US borders, the partition of Germany, and Foreign Aid to nations inside the Soviet orbit.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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...

I believe that the clearest view that we today might obtain of General Edwin Walker is found in the 1962 movie, SEVEN DAYS IN MAY, starring Burt Lancaster. It is the story of a General who disagrees so much with the White House that he goes on radio and tours making speeches and filling auditoriums with his extreme rightist audiences. He is supported directly by sycophants and not a few followers among the military Brass.

Edwin Walker was so well-known in Texas, and had written so many critical articles about the JFK administration, that JFK's words would have been immediately understood by the majority of Texans to imply General Walker, just as the writer suggests.

I don't believe J.F. Ter Horst was attemping to implant some foreign idea; I believe he spoke directly to the Zeitgeist of Texas in 1963.

Paul, agree with your assessment of Walker and his standing with the Right Wing in the early 60's. I was not implying J. F. Ter Horst was trying to implant a foreign idea. I was more concerned with the question of actually inserting the name of an individual into the article, that to the average reader, connected that person to the assassination.

And I am also in agreement on Seven Days in May. We had a thread discussing assassination movies not too long ago, and this movie was one of the best.

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...

From the POV if the spin the press puts on news distribution, it seems logical the circumstances related to the recent Adlai Stevenson, "visit" to Dallas would be considered by news wire and major news outlet editors and reporters as a set up or prequel to the unfolding news reports of the shooting of President Kennedy in Dallas.

Quickly treating the shooting during Kennedy's appearance in Dallas as a sequel to Stevenson's recent visit could have been done at news desks in New York.

It may not be significant that early reports mentioned Edwin Walker. It may have simply been members of the press corps lacing their reporting with speculation of who could have despised JFK and his politics enough to shoot him.

http://www.google.co...iw=1440&bih=695

Stevenson Is Mobbed After Dallas Speech .Un Ambassador...

Beaver Country Times - Oct 25, 1963

DALLAS — Adlai Stevenson, US ambassador to -the United Nations, gave an optimistic view of ... Edwin Walker's following and the John Birchers,' Jack Goren, ...

Stevenson Booed and Hit By Dallas...‎ New York Times ($3.95)

Texas Mob Insults Adlai .‎ Deseret News

all 69 news articles »

Flies Distress Si Final .

St. Joseph News-Press - Nov 1, 1963

Edwin Walker flew a group of American flags upside down in front of his home in ... apologies for abuse given United Nations Am' assador Adlai Stevenson in ...

Reports Place Oswald at Rally for Stevenson

Sights Which Was Assassinate .

News And Courier - Nov 23, 1963

... where United Nations Ambassador Adlai Stevenson was spat upon and hit last month; in the same state Former Maj. Gen. Edwin Walker of the lunatic fringe ...

Who's To Blame? .‎ Telegraph-Herald

all 4 news articles »

Dallas; For Disgrace By .Mil .Sosin .

Miami News - Nov 24, 1963

... Ambassador Adlai Stevenson was spat upon last month; in the same state that former Major Gen. Edwin Walker of the lunatic fringe Right Wing calls home; ...

Jfk's Critics Sowed Discord .

Kennedy Stifles Stiffer Civil Rights Bill

Pay-Per-View -

Hartford Courant - Oct 27, 1963

In Dallas, Texas, United Nations Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson had to fight his ... Edwin Walker. He said they "had disgraced Dallas and the good manners of ..

Some excellent articles in that group. It's obvious now that numerous news stories in various cities immediately after the assassination were tossing Gen. Walker's name into the mix.

Makes you wonder why, if the press was pounding the right wing theme so hard, would the White House and the DPD be claiming the day after the assassination that the murder had been solved and there was no conspiracy.

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b.

Bernice, it just now occurred to me that you might have more of these exciting thumbnails about General Edwin Walker. Now, where would you have obtained these? Have you been collecting them?

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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