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...Makes you wonder why, if the press was pounding the right wing theme so hard, would the White House and the DPD be claiming the day after the assassination that the murder had been solved and there was no conspiracy.

Excellent question, Richard. Your question implies a potentially explosive situation, doesn't it?

--Paul

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...It may not be significant that early reports mentioned Edwin Walker. It may have simply been members of the press corps lacing their reporting with speculation of who could have despised JFK and his politics enough to shoot him.

<snip>

[ St. Joseph News-Press - Nov 1, 1963

Edwin Walker flew a group of American flags upside down in front of his home in ... apologies for abuse given United Nations Ambassador Adlai Stevenson in [Dallas]...]

I have a correction to the story in the St. Joseph News-Press which claims that Walker flew his US Flag upside-down in apology to Adlai Stevenson.

Actually, it was Mayor Earl Cabell who apologized to Adlai Stevenson. Walker never apologized.

Walker -- coldly and factually -- disavowed any participation in the event itself. "I watched over TV," said Walker. "I didn't have to be there -- I'd done enough against him," he said in a boasting tone.

Following that lead, Congressman Bruce Alger also refused to apologize to Stevenson.

General Edwin Walker concluded: "Adlai got what was coming to him."

We must remember that Edwin Walker and the JBS firmly believed that the United Nations was Communist plot #1. This was not a matter for debate with them.

General Walker flew his US Flag upside down for two solid weeks. The Dallas Morning News said it was in protest of Mayor Earl Cabell's apology to Adlai Stevenson. But General Walker said it was to protest the assassination of South Vietnam President Diem.

[source: Chris Cravens, 1993]

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo, MA

Edited by Paul Trejo
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i lost my post darn it.......paul here is a copy out of the shooting at walker, but not the newspaper clipping.....i have never come upon many clippings on him, some photos but not much else, fwtaw......b

Here is a transcript of the report of the Dallas Morning News on the=20

attempt on General Edwin Walker's life in April 1963. The report is=20

from the front page of the 11 April, 1963 edition of the DMN:=20

QUOTE ON:=20

CLOSE CALL=20

Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker=20

by Eddie Hughes=20

A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General=20

Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the=20

controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his=20

income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed=20

through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police=20

said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one=20

had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it=20

was certainly wanted to kill him.'=20

"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right=20

sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of=20

his hair when reporters arrived. Walker said he returned to his Dallas=20

home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called=20

'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants=20

noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the=20

alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained=20

there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to=20

the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot=20

at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.=20

You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying=20

the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I=20

went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I=20

didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."=20

QUOTE OFF=20

If anyone is able to provide a scan of the actual article, or point to=20

a pdf version of it on line, I would be most appreciative. Thanks! :-)=20

Regards,=20

Tim Brennan=20

Sydney, Australia=20

*Newsgroup(s) Commentator*=20

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a few more and a couple of links and that's about it Paul..........fwtaw..b

testimony of General Walker.....there are some w/c photo links within of his backyard and home i believe...

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/walker_e.htm

and

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/199/toomanyquestionspage1.jpg/ peter worthington's interview with general walker..

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a few more and a couple of links and that's about it Paul..........fwtaw..b

Bernice, you have a superior collection. Many thanks for posting it.

I have some immediate comments on your collection. First, the WANTED FOR TREASON poster was probably Walker's idea, as filtered through Larrie Schmidt. By posting it side-by-side with Walker's portrait you seem to be making the connection.

Secondly, the most striking photograph you posted is the newspaper clipping entitled, "Sniper Shooting at Walker Home". It is critical for my theory to know the precise date of that newspaper clipping.

I say this because we can contrast it with the other newspaper clipping you shared, namely, the one entitled, "Oswald Claimed Shot at Walker: Wife Tells FBI He Tried Killing Ex-General." The date for that article is clear: "Friday, December 6, 1963".

Now, according to official FBI records, the FBI had no idea that Lee Harvey Oswald was the shooter at General Walker on 4/10/1963 until Marina told them on the evening of Thu05Dec63.

General Walker's own writings tell several different stories:

(1) Walker claimed that the Dallas Police suspected Oswald on 4/10/1963, brought Oswald into custody, yet had to release Oswald that same night because of a call from the State Department, from RFK, demanding his immediate release. This is Walker's most common story that he told the rest of his life.

(2) Walker claimed that the FBI knew the Oswald was his shooter at that time.

(3) Walker claimed that he had no idea that Oswald was his shooter back in April, 1963, but he only found out about it on December 6, like everybody else, and still had his doubts. This was what he told the Warren Commission in 1964.

(4) Walker claimed that a German newspaper reporter, Helmut Muench, guessed that Oswald was his shooter on 11/23/1963, during an early morning interview with Walker less than 20 hours after the JFK assassination. (However, the FBI and WC attorney Liebeler claimed that Helmut Muench of the Deutsche NationalZeitung confessed that General Walker was the one who told him that Oswald was his April shooter.)

(5) Walker claimed that the FBI and CIA strong-armed the Dallas Police to release Oswald on 4/10/1963, and that Jesse Curry knows it but refuses to confess it, and that there were two shooters that night, Oswald and probably a CIA contractor, both paid by RFK.

My question is why General Walker would waver about his knowledge of this connection of Oswald with JFK and himself.

Now you can see, Bernice, why the date of that first clipping is so important to my theory. It appears to come before Marina told the FBI that Oswald was Walker's shooter back in April, 1963, if I go only by the wording.

If so, then I have little doubt that General Walker himself was the source of that story. He could not stop himself from spreading that rumor. He was basically boasting about it. He was connecting himself with the JFK assassination for the whole world to see.

When asked point blank about this by the Warren Commission, General Walker lied and acted innocent; he only found out when everybody else found out. But the FBI testimony by Helmut Muench (available on the Mary Ferrell web site) told a different story.

In any case, Bernice, I very much appreciate your sharing of your photo collection with this thread on General Walker.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Your very welcome, i have no date for that clipping but will have a look within the front pages of the newspapers i have downloaded, it just may be there, if so i will get back to you and post it, if not then i will not have had any luck..take care,,,b

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a few more and a couple of links and that's about it Paul..........fwtaw..b

Bernice, you have a superior collection. Many thanks for posting it.

I have some immediate comments on your collection. First, the WANTED FOR TREASON poster was probably Walker's idea, as filtered through Larrie Schmidt. By posting it side-by-side with Walker's portrait you seem to be making the connection.

Secondly, the most striking photograph you posted is the newspaper clipping entitled, "Sniper Shooting at Walker Home". It is critical for my theory to know the precise date of that newspaper clipping.

I say this because we can contrast it with the other newspaper clipping you shared, namely, the one entitled, "Oswald Claimed Shot at Walker: Wife Tells FBI He Tried Killing Ex-General." The date for that article is clear: "Friday, December 6, 1963".

Now, according to official FBI records, the FBI had no idea that Lee Harvey Oswald was the shooter at General Walker on 4/10/1963 until Marina told them on the evening of Thu05Dec63.

General Walker's own writings tell several different stories:

(1) Walker claimed that the Dallas Police suspected Oswald on 4/10/1963, brought Oswald into custody, yet had to release Oswald that same night because of a call from the State Department, from RFK, demanding his immediate release. This is Walker's most common story that he told the rest of his life.

(2) Walker claimed that the FBI knew the Oswald was his shooter at that time.

(3) Walker claimed that he had no idea that Oswald was his shooter back in April, 1963, but he only found out about it on December 6, like everybody else, and still had his doubts. This was what he told the Warren Commission in 1964.

(4) Walker claimed that a German newspaper reporter, Helmut Muench, guessed that Oswald was his shooter on 11/23/1963, during an early morning interview with Walker less than 20 hours after the JFK assassination. (However, the FBI and WC attorney Liebeler claimed that Helmut Muench of the Deutsche NationalZeitung confessed that General Walker was the one who told him that Oswald was his April shooter.)

(5) Walker claimed that the FBI and CIA strong-armed the Dallas Police to release Oswald on 4/10/1963, and that Jesse Curry knows it but refuses to confess it, and that there were two shooters that night, Oswald and probably a CIA contractor, both paid by RFK.

My question is why General Walker would waver about his knowledge of this connection of Oswald with JFK and himself.

Now you can see, Bernice, why the date of that first clipping is so important to my theory. It appears to come before Marina told the FBI that Oswald was Walker's shooter back in April, 1963, if I go only by the wording.

If so, then I have little doubt that General Walker himself was the source of that story. He could not stop himself from spreading that rumor. He was basically boasting about it. He was connecting himself with the JFK assassination for the whole world to see.

When asked point blank about this by the Warren Commission, General Walker lied and acted innocent; he only found out when everybody else found out. But the FBI testimony by Helmut Muench (available on the Mary Ferrell web site) told a different story.

In any case, Bernice, I very much appreciate your sharing of your photo collection with this thread on General Walker.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Paul, what is your source for Item number one?

If Walker was on public record before the JFK assassination, of believing that the Kennedy brothers had taken out a contract on him, and attempted to shoot him, that should have made Walker the prime suspect in the eyes of law enforcement after JFK was assassinated.

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"... Mr. Kennedy was to have spoken out against the radical right wing at the trade mart. He had planned to accuse the radical right wing of substituting hysteria for national policy.

Dallas is the home of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, who is acknowledged here as the leader of the radical right wing in Texas, and one of the rightest leaders of the South."

- is an interesting bit. Walker was relieved precicely for expressing his ideas that could be taken as foreign policy being counter to an executive order. So, if that's so, here we have Kennedy clearly, or at least seen as such by Walker, attacking Walker, again. Walker must have by now really been hating Kennedy, and he knew others knew he did to wit his ensuring the pilots taking him to Shreveport signed his ticket when the news came. Gotta have an iron clad alibi.

John, if you look at the text of the unspoken Trade Mart speech, JFK does touch upon the above themes, but does so in a very general way.

http://smu.edu/smune.../speechtext.asp

The portion of the speech that deals with "dissident voices":

"... This link between leadership and learning is not only essential at the community level. It is even more indispensable in world affairs. Ignorance and misinformation can handicap the progress of a city or a company, but they can, if allowed to prevail in foreign policy, handicap this country's security. In a world of complex and continuing problems, in a world full of frustrations and irritations, America's leadership must be guided by the lights of learning and reason or else those who confuse rhetoric with reality and the plausible with the possible will gain the popular ascendancy with their seemingly swift and simple solutions to every world problem.There will always be dissident voices heard in the land, expressing opposition without alternatives, finding fault but never favor, perceiving gloom on every side and seeking influence without responsibility. Those voices are inevitable.

But today other voices are heard in the land -- voices preaching doctrines wholly unrelated to reality, wholly unsuited to the sixties, doctrines which apparently assume that words will suffice without weapons, that vituperation is as good as victory and that peace is a sign of weakness. At a time when the national debt is steadily being reduced in terms of its burden on our economy, they see that debt as the greatest single threat to our security. At a time when we are steadily reducing the number of Federal employees serving every thousand citizens, they fear those supposed hordes of civil servants far more than the actual hordes of opposing armies.

We cannot expect that everyone, to use the phrase of a decade ago, will "talk sense to the American people." But we can hope that fewer people will listen to nonsense. And the notion that this Nation is headed for defeat through deficit, or that strength is but a matter of slogans, is nothing but just plain nonsense. ..."

Although the message of the speech is clear, JFK never mentions Gen. Walker by name, and also does not make any reference to the "radical right" or "radical right wing" in the text of the speech. That makes me wonder why the author of the News article would specifically name Walker and his right wing affiliates as the target. And finishing the article on the assassination with the Walker reference could be seen as an attempt to link Walker to the assassination in the public's mind.

So the next question would be, did J. F. Ter Horst insert the Walker reference himself, or was it something he got from another source?

From a speech President Kennedy delivered on November 18, 1961:

Now we are face to face once again with a period of heightened peril. The risks are great, the burdens heavy, the problems incapable of swift or lasting solution. And under the strains and frustrations imposed by constant tensions and harassment, the discordant voices of extremism are once again heard in the land. Men who are unwilling to face up to the danger from without are convinced that the real danger is from within. They look suspiciously at their neighbors and their leaders. They call for a 'man on horseback' because they do not trust the people. They find treason in our churches, in our highest court, in our treatment of water. They equate the Democratic Party with the welfare state, the welfare state with socialism, socialism with communism. They object quite rightly to politics intruding on the military -- but they are very anxious for the military to engage in their kind of politics.

But you and I and most Americans take a different view of our peril. We know that it comes from without, not within. It must be met by quiet preparedness, not provocative speeches.

Edited by Michael Hogan
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fwtaw,,b

There is one thing that has always puzzled me The photo showing the back yard of the Walker home shows the plate on the car with a hole in it. Yet there is also a photo of Oswald's belongings it shows the photo of that Oswald took and it is hole is not there.

Does anyone know who could have put the hole there removeing the plate number?

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Your very welcome, i have no date for that clipping but will have a look within the front pages of the newspapers i have downloaded, it just may be there, if so i will get back to you and post it, if not then i will not have had any luck..take care,,,b

Bernice, a new member told me the date just yesterday: it was 11/23/1963, the morning after JFK was killed.

I hope this new member, Gary Mack, joins this thread. His opinion is that the connection between Oswald and Walker was simply Reporting 101, and nothing else -- a connection anybody would make. That means it was a mere coincidence that Walker made this same connection in his 6am phone conversation with Helmut Muench in Germany that very same morning. Well, it's possible.

Anyway, thanks again for your clippings and photos, Bernice. They help everybody go way back a half-century to recall events long forgotten.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Does it matter when the article (and by whom. It may be of interest the DMH editor statements about Carolines Pony at a luncheon earlier in the year and the 'eternal' search for 'the man on horse back', once being Hitler, and in the US america firster Lindbergh, and with Walker a new candidate) written, typeset, printed and on the street?

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(1) Walker claimed that the Dallas Police suspected Oswald on 4/10/1963, brought Oswald into custody, yet had to release Oswald that same night because of a call from the State Department, from RFK, demanding his immediate release. This is Walker's most common story that he told the rest of his life.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Paul, what is your source for Item number one?

If Walker was on public record before the JFK assassination, of believing that the Kennedy brothers had taken out a contract on him, and attempted to shoot him, that should have made Walker the prime suspect in the eyes of law enforcement after JFK was assassinated.

Good question, Richard. My source is the Briscoe Center for American History, Edwin Walker archives. (My PDF files from Briscoe are too big to upload to the Education Forum, but I'm working on a solution to that.)

Allow me to share three of those documents, just to provide a sampling. I will start at the very end, with Walker's last known article on this topic, from November, 1991.

------------ BEGIN WALKER #1 ---------------------

A common assassin with a dead President -- Commander in Chief is an ugly experience since 1963.

The President went to Dallas knowing and protecting his November assassin Lee H. Hoswald from prosecution for his April Crime "Attempted Assassination of the former General working at his desk in his Dallas home, 9:00 p.m. April 10."

The Kenney protection included an early-morning, secret release of the prime suspect Lee H. oswald, from Dallas Police Custody on Kenney orders, April 11.

The President did not live to know that he knew his assassin but everyone else lived to know that he did and that his assassin could not be prosecuted for the November Crime because of his Kennedy protection for his April Crime.

The law does not provide for protection and prosecution at the same time.

Only by the election of a new government could the protection be eliminated.

They common assassin was dead within forty-eight hours, Friday to Sunday.

NOV. 1991 EDWIN A. WALKER

------------ END WALKER #1 ---------------------

This short article was published verbatim in the Kerrville Daily Times Sunday, January 19, 1992, under the headline, JFK DIDN"T KNOW HE KNEW HIS ASSASSIN. This same theme is repeated in numerous other documents in Walker's Briscoe Center archives, too.

Now here's an excerpt from a longer article from April, 1967. This article is also written by Walker, but as he so often does, he refers to himself in the third person. The reference to 4011 is to Walker's address (4011 Turtle Creek Road, Dallas, TX). For four pages Walker recollects his clash with the Kennedys from 1961 to 1963, including his 'imprisonment' in an insane asylum. This is the final paragraph:

------------ BEGIN WALKER #2 ---------------------

In fact at 4011, Walker ways that witnesses in Dallas are ample and adequate to establish that Oswald was picked up by the law enforcement agency between 9pm and 12 midnight, April 10, 1963, after the incidence. He was released. Michael Paine testified that he brought the Oswalds to his house the night of April 10th for dinner. The pickup was withheld from the public, so Oswald's name was never heard of, except by his own associates and friends, of which there were many and some shockingly influential, until he was apprehended on Nov. 22, 1963.

------------ END WALKER #2 ---------------------

But perhaps the most dramatic repetition of Walker's Forgotten Myth is found in the German newsapaper, Deutsche NationalZeitung, culled from a number of interviews that Walker gave the paper less than 24 hours after the JFK assassination.

Helmut Muench was the editor who first received Walker's early A.M. call, after which he spoke with the Newspaper owner, Dr. Frey, and then set up two in-depth interviews to begin at 7am that same morning between General Walker and interviewer Haslo Thorsten. (In my opinion, those so-called interviews sound scripted, but that's another story.)

To read the full trans-Atlantic phone call between Walker and the German newspaper on 11/23/1963 -- the actual transcript -- there is a clear online reproduction on the Mary Ferrell web site. Just logon to http://www.maryferrell.org/ and then use this search: ADMIN FOLDER-E11: HSCA ADMINISTRATIVE FOLDER, OUTGOING TO COMMISSION VOL IX. Then read pages 330-340.

It's a short read, and most revealing. Please pay special attention to page 330, since it shows that Rankin had evidence that Walker spoke to Muench, and so Walker lied to the WC when he denied the fact.

For just the blurb under the headline for that German article, I include an English translation of it here:

------------ BEGIN MUENCH 11/29/1963 ---------------------

THE STRANGE CASE OF OSWALD. The murderer of Kennedy made an attempt on U.S. General Walker's life early in the summer when General Walker was sitting in his study. The bullet missed Walker's head only by inches. Oswald was seized, but the following investigation - as it was reported to us - was stopped by U.S. General Attorney Robert Kennedy. Otherwise, Oswald would have been imprisoned for many years and so he would not have been able to commit the murder of John F. Kennedy, the brother of Robert Kennedy.

------------ END MUENCH 11/29/1963 ---------------------

I trust this addresses your question about my sources, Richard.

As for your comment that Walker's vendetta against RFK for his trip to the insane asylum deserved special attention after the JFK assassination -- I absolutely agree. That is the heart of my own theory.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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"... Mr. Kennedy was to have spoken out against the radical right wing at the trade mart. He had planned to accuse the radical right wing of substituting hysteria for national policy.

Dallas is the home of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, who is acknowledged here as the leader of the radical right wing in Texas, and one of the rightest leaders of the South."

- is an interesting bit. Walker was relieved precicely for expressing his ideas that could be taken as foreign policy being counter to an executive order. So, if that's so, here we have Kennedy clearly, or at least seen as such by Walker, attacking Walker, again. Walker must have by now really been hating Kennedy, and he knew others knew he did to wit his ensuring the pilots taking him to Shreveport signed his ticket when the news came. Gotta have an iron clad alibi.

John, if you look at the text of the unspoken Trade Mart speech, JFK does touch upon the above themes, but does so in a very general way.

http://smu.edu/smune.../speechtext.asp

The portion of the speech that deals with "dissident voices":

"... This link between leadership and learning is not only essential at the community level. It is even more indispensable in world affairs. Ignorance and misinformation can handicap the progress of a city or a company, but they can, if allowed to prevail in foreign policy, handicap this country's security. In a world of complex and continuing problems, in a world full of frustrations and irritations, America's leadership must be guided by the lights of learning and reason or else those who confuse rhetoric with reality and the plausible with the possible will gain the popular ascendancy with their seemingly swift and simple solutions to every world problem.There will always be dissident voices heard in the land, expressing opposition without alternatives, finding fault but never favor, perceiving gloom on every side and seeking influence without responsibility. Those voices are inevitable.

But today other voices are heard in the land -- voices preaching doctrines wholly unrelated to reality, wholly unsuited to the sixties, doctrines which apparently assume that words will suffice without weapons, that vituperation is as good as victory and that peace is a sign of weakness. At a time when the national debt is steadily being reduced in terms of its burden on our economy, they see that debt as the greatest single threat to our security. At a time when we are steadily reducing the number of Federal employees serving every thousand citizens, they fear those supposed hordes of civil servants far more than the actual hordes of opposing armies.

We cannot expect that everyone, to use the phrase of a decade ago, will "talk sense to the American people." But we can hope that fewer people will listen to nonsense. And the notion that this Nation is headed for defeat through deficit, or that strength is but a matter of slogans, is nothing but just plain nonsense. ..."

Although the message of the speech is clear, JFK never mentions Gen. Walker by name, and also does not make any reference to the "radical right" or "radical right wing" in the text of the speech. That makes me wonder why the author of the News article would specifically name Walker and his right wing affiliates as the target. And finishing the article on the assassination with the Walker reference could be seen as an attempt to link Walker to the assassination in the public's mind.

So the next question would be, did J. F. Ter Horst insert the Walker reference himself, or was it something he got from another source?

From a speech President Kennedy delivered on November 18, 1961:

Now we are face to face once again with a period of heightened peril. The risks are great, the burdens heavy, the problems incapable of swift or lasting solution. And under the strains and frustrations imposed by constant tensions and harassment, the discordant voices of extremism are once again heard in the land. Men who are unwilling to face up to the danger from without are convinced that the real danger is from within. They look suspiciously at their neighbors and their leaders. They call for a 'man on horseback' because they do not trust the people. They find treason in our churches, in our highest court, in our treatment of water. They equate the Democratic Party with the welfare state, the welfare state with socialism, socialism with communism. They object quite rightly to politics intruding on the military -- but they are very anxious for the military to engage in their kind of politics.

But you and I and most Americans take a different view of our peril. We know that it comes from without, not within. It must be met by quiet preparedness, not provocative speeches.

An interesting speech given in the thick of the missile crisis. I would have expected JFK to be more alarmed with the Hawks in the JCS, but his main concerns seem to be directed at Walker and his followers. Thanks for the link, Michael.

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(1) Walker claimed that the Dallas Police suspected Oswald on 4/10/1963, brought Oswald into custody, yet had to release Oswald that same night because of a call from the State Department, from RFK, demanding his immediate release. This is Walker's most common story that he told the rest of his life.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Paul, what is your source for Item number one?

If Walker was on public record before the JFK assassination, of believing that the Kennedy brothers had taken out a contract on him, and attempted to shoot him, that should have made Walker the prime suspect in the eyes of law enforcement after JFK was assassinated.

Good question, Richard. My source is the Briscoe Center for American History, Edwin Walker archives. (My PDF files from Briscoe are too big to upload to the Education Forum, but I'm working on a solution to that.)

Allow me to share three of those documents, just to provide a sampling. I will start at the very end, with Walker's last known article on this topic, from November, 1991.

------------ BEGIN WALKER #1 ---------------------

A common assassin with a dead President -- Commander in Chief is an ugly experience since 1963.

The President went to Dallas knowing and protecting his November assassin Lee H. Hoswald from prosecution for his April Crime "Attempted Assassination of the former General working at his desk in his Dallas home, 9:00 p.m. April 10."

The Kenney protection included an early-morning, secret release of the prime suspect Lee H. oswald, from Dallas Police Custody on Kenney orders, April 11.

The President did not live to know that he knew his assassin but everyone else lived to know that he did and that his assassin could not be prosecuted for the November Crime because of his Kennedy protection for his April Crime.

The law does not provide for protection and prosecution at the same time.

Only by the election of a new government could the protection be eliminated.

They common assassin was dead within forty-eight hours, Friday to Sunday.

NOV. 1991 EDWIN A. WALKER

------------ END WALKER #1 ---------------------

This short article was published verbatim in the Kerrville Daily Times Sunday, January 19, 1992, under the headline, JFK DIDN"T KNOW HE KNEW HIS ASSASSIN. This same theme is repeated in numerous other documents in Walker's Briscoe Center archives, too.

Now here's an excerpt from a longer article from April, 1967. This article is also written by Walker, but as he so often does, he refers to himself in the third person. The reference to 4011 is to Walker's address (4011 Turtle Creek Road, Dallas, TX). For four pages Walker recollects his clash with the Kennedys from 1961 to 1963, including his 'imprisonment' in an insane asylum. This is the final paragraph:

------------ BEGIN WALKER #2 ---------------------

In fact at 4011, Walker ways that witnesses in Dallas are ample and adequate to establish that Oswald was picked up by the law enforcement agency between 9pm and 12 midnight, April 10, 1963, after the incidence. He was released. Michael Paine testified that he brought the Oswalds to his house the night of April 10th for dinner. The pickup was withheld from the public, so Oswald's name was never heard of, except by his own associates and friends, of which there were many and some shockingly influential, until he was apprehended on Nov. 22, 1963.

------------ END WALKER #2 ---------------------

But perhaps the most dramatic repetition of Walker's Forgotten Myth is found in the German newsapaper, Deutsche NationalZeitung, culled from a number of interviews that Walker gave the paper less than 24 hours after the JFK assassination.

Helmut Muench was the editor who first received Walker's early A.M. call, after which he spoke with the Newspaper owner, Dr. Frey, and then set up two in-depth interviews to begin at 7am that same morning between General Walker and interviewer Haslo Thorsten. (In my opinion, those so-called interviews sound scripted, but that's another story.)

To read the full trans-Atlantic phone call between Walker and the German newspaper on 11/23/1963 -- the actual transcript -- there is a clear online reproduction on the Mary Ferrell web site. Just logon to http://www.maryferrell.org/ and then use this search: ADMIN FOLDER-E11: HSCA ADMINISTRATIVE FOLDER, OUTGOING TO COMMISSION VOL IX. Then read pages 330-340.

It's a short read, and most revealing. Please pay special attention to page 330, since it shows that Rankin had evidence that Walker spoke to Muench, and so Walker lied to the WC when he denied the fact.

For just the blurb under the headline for that German article, I include an English translation of it here:

------------ BEGIN MUENCH 11/29/1963 ---------------------

THE STRANGE CASE OF OSWALD. The murderer of Kennedy made an attempt on U.S. General Walker's life early in the summer when General Walker was sitting in his study. The bullet missed Walker's head only by inches. Oswald was seized, but the following investigation - as it was reported to us - was stopped by U.S. General Attorney Robert Kennedy. Otherwise, Oswald would have been imprisoned for many years and so he would not have been able to commit the murder of John F. Kennedy, the brother of Robert Kennedy.

------------ END MUENCH 11/29/1963 ---------------------

I trust this addresses your question about my sources, Richard.

As for your comment that Walker's vendetta against RFK for his trip to the insane asylum deserved special attention after the JFK assassination -- I absolutely agree. That is the heart of my own theory.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Appreciate you taking the time to post that Paul. One of the items I was most interested in was the question of "When" Walker had first announced it was his belief or knowledge that Oswald had been arrested by DPD on April 10, 1963 and subsequently released by directive of the Attorney General. Everything I have seen so far shows no public statement by Edwin Walker about this issue until after the JFK Assassination.

As to whether Oswald was even involved in the April 10 shooting, I believe a good case can be made for a frame-up.

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