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THE PARALLAX VIEW, JFK, RFK, etc.


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22 hours ago, Joseph McBride said:

I didn't want to go to work on Sunday, November 24, but my mother

insisted I go to Milwaukee County Stadium to do my job as a vendor

at an NFL game (I was putting myself through high school that way).

The Packers were playing the San Francisco 49ers. I later met a 49ers player from that game who told me he and his colleagues were resentful at having to play; the NFL owners were largely conservative

and didn't care about Kennedy, to say the least. When the news about

Oswald being shot came through before the game, I saw it breaking

as a wave in the stands with people listening to their little transistor

radios, the only time I've ever seen news being received that way.

So I missed the live broadcast but saw the tape later that day. I always

resented I couldn't have stayed home and watched the unfolding

news that Sunday. On the Friday night, my siblings went to see

the lousy PT 109 movie at our local theater while I watched Oswald

being dragged through the halls of the police station denying he

was guilty and saying, "I'm just a patsy!" (That's one reason

I care more than they do about the case.) By that evening I was believing

in Oswald's innocence, and from the first radio reports I began hearing at 12:40 that day and the abrupt

change at 1 p.m. to shift all the shots from the front, my journalistic antennae (I had already

been a journalist for three years when it happened) told me

something was wrong with the lone-gunman story.

That is an amazing historical account. 

I was at Bucknell U November 22, and we walked around outside all afternoon, going in to watch AF1 land and hear LBJ's awful speech.  There was a memorial service that evening, and then we were dismissed early for Thanksgiving vacation. Back in Fairfield, CT, my family and I were literally watching tv that Sunday, while eating Swanson chicken tv dinners. We had stayed home from church, which was unusual. So I did watch Lee Oswald walk out into the lights. My first impression was relief, that he had finally been allowed to change his clothes. He looked like a college student. That was, of course, shortlived, as I watched him being shot.  I knew without a doubt that he had not done this awful deed alone, and maybe not at all.  So started my pursuit...

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On 3/9/2021 at 10:45 PM, Joseph McBride said:

I didn't want to go to work on Sunday, November 24, but my mother

insisted I go to Milwaukee County Stadium to do my job as a vendor

at an NFL game (I was putting myself through high school that way).

The Packers were playing the San Francisco 49ers. I later met a 49ers player from that game who told me he and his colleagues were resentful at having to play; the NFL owners were largely conservative

and didn't care about Kennedy, to say the least. When the news about

Oswald being shot came through before the game, I saw it breaking

as a wave in the stands with people listening to their little transistor

radios, the only time I've ever seen news being received that way.

So I missed the live TV broadcast but saw the tape later that day. I always

resented I couldn't have stayed home and watched the unfolding

news that Sunday. On the Friday night, my siblings went to see

the lousy PT 109 movie at our local theater while I watched Oswald

being dragged through the halls of the police station denying he

was guilty and saying, "I'm just a patsy!" (That's one reason

I care more than they do about the case.) By that evening I was believing

in Oswald's innocence, and from the first radio reports I began hearing at 12:40 that day and the abrupt

change at 1 p.m. to shift all the shots from the front to behind, my journalistic antennae (I had already

been a journalist for three years when it happened) told me

something was wrong with the lone-gunman story.

Thank you sincerely, very much, for your personal reflections on multiple historical instances about the JFK Assassination.  I hope they are recorded long term for future perspective.

I imagine you already well know this but you weren't alone that day on not wanting to work.  Almost nobody in the league wanted to.  But Pete Rozelle  reputedly got a call from Pierre Salinger saying go ahead, said to be authorized by RFK.  Personally I can't imagine him giving a dooky about the nfl at the time.

I've watched him on TV many times  but never though of Mickey Spagnola as eloquent or especially perceptive.  But this is well worth reading on the subject imho.

Never knew that "Armed guards were stationed  in the stands and on the roof of Cleveland Memorial Stadium".  Though I've read of the cowboy's being advised not to mention being from Dallas, keep their helmets and parkas on to deflect anything thrown.   Art Model told the announcer not to mention Dallas, just cowboys.

Spagnola: Nov. 22, 1963, A Day You Never Forget (dallascowboys.com)  

Edited by Ron Bulman
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Deleted and copied to place in another more subject appropriate thread to keep the Parallax View thread focus.

Not meaning to take away from the importance of the film, but has anyone else noticed a curious visual aspect anomaly regards several ( most ) of the P V's many outdoor scenes?

I was born in Spokane. I have lived in Portland, Oregon. I know the U.S. Northwest well enough to know that the weather in Seattle is seldom warm and sunny.

I don't know why almost every daytime outdoor scene in this film was depicted in a sunny setting way. 

I made an unconsciously spontaneous comment to my wife while we watched the film that Seattle sure seemed more warm and sunny in this film than the Seattle that I knew or pictured in my mind.

Although, it would have surely been more distracting to the script if most or even half those outdoor scene's were filmed in typical Seattle  grey, damp, drizzly or rainy weather  I admit.

 

 

Edited by Joe Bauer
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On 3/5/2021 at 7:02 PM, James DiEugenio said:

Which is what many have called the RFK murder, a magic trick.  

 

That is absolutely what it was. It was weaponized magic, with misdirection being a key element in successfully carrying out the assassination.

What happened in the pantry is a real-life version of something that the Mission: Impossible team would have put together. Which is fitting, given Lisa Pease's research and the connections to Robert Maheu she uncovered, a man who was the real-life inspiration for Mission: Impossible.

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5 hours ago, Richard Booth said:

That is absolutely what it was. It was weaponized magic, with misdirection being a key element in successfully carrying out the assassination.

What happened in the pantry is a real-life version of something that the Mission: Impossible team would have put together. Which is fitting, given Lisa Pease's research and the connections to Robert Maheu she uncovered, a man who was the real-life inspiration for Mission: Impossible.

Magic practiced by the U S government.  They literally employed magicians to teach deception to CIA employees.

Lisa is a Hero.

Edited by Ron Bulman
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2 minutes ago, Ron Bulman said:

Magic practiced by the U S government.  They literally employed magicians to teach deception to CIA employees.

Lisa is a Hero.

Indeed they did, none other than one of the world's most renowned magicians, John Mulholland.  Surely others, too.

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