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New video - JFK Assassination: Nothing but the truth


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Chris, evidence has been posted on CLINT HILLS reactions, but allow me to provide you with important points.

1) CLINT HILL claims he heard two shots, the second of which was the cause of the fatal head shot.

2) HILL claimed to react after the first shot but before the second shot, this testimony is corroborated by others.

3) The first shot appears to have occurred around Z-190, this is substantiated by testimony from READY, LANDIS, HICKEY and HILL that all claimed they heard the first shot and reacted to it, the only time that all four of these SSA reacted simultaneously was immediately following Z-190 and they all reacted by looking in the direction of the gk.

Zapruder Frame -207 is a clear example of these actions

z207_zpsc6b2e7f3.jpg

0) Also please notice although READY, LANDIS, HICKEY and HILL seem to be aware of some noise coming from the direction of the GK, MCINTYRE does not seem to have noticed nor does PO CHANEY, HARGIS or MARTIN.

4) HILL can be seen to monitor the actions of the occupants in the limo after ~Z-200, he is seen looking towards the limo even in Altgens #6 or Z-255, this is supported by claims to have noticed KENNEDY's actions during this time.

5) We must use logic here in that if HILL heard a shot at Z-190 and he reacted before the second shot, but we do not see him react until after Z-300 then it was not the sound of the first shot that caused him to react and it could not have been the sound of the second because he reacts prior to the second shot having been heard, than there must be another reason for HILL to have reacted.

6) The other event that was occurring after Z-190 was that CONNALLY had turned in his seat and was conversing with JACKIE, by Z-300 CONNALLY had laid back over the top of NELLIE, this must have been an alarming sight for HILL who would have been bewildered then alarmed by the actions of CONNALLY.

Limo-Nellie-nomovementv2_zpsd1303fc1.gif

7) We know CLINT HILL reacted immediately after Z-300 because we can see him running toward the limo prior to Z-313. CONNALLY laying back over the top of NELLIE must be the stimulus for HILL to rush to the limo. Why didn't READY also react, because he was scanning the crowd to the rear as seen in ALTGENS #6 and could not have noticed CONNALLY's odd behavior when he laid back on top of NELLIE.

Nix1-Seq028_zpsff26e25e.jpg

8) All of this also helps prove that the first shot fired was silent or like a 'firecracker' which caught the attention of the four SSA but did not cause them to be alarmed, seeing CONNALLY lay down in the limo caused HILL to become alarmed, causing him to react by rushing to aid the occupants of the limo.

9) READY can be seen to react at the sound of the shot at Z-313, which is the first HPR shot heard within DP.

Nix1-Seq048_zps35c33ad1.jpg

Zapruder film evidence supports this conjecture.

Nix film evidence supports this conjecture.

Testimony supports this conjecture, if you also realize that the SSA were pressured to create reports that would not directly conflict with WC/R fiction, although there is still much evidence within these reports that is in direct conflict with the WC/R. In the case of CLINT HILL's SSA report he was honest in claiming he reacted after the first shot and before the second, what he was forced to omit IMO was that he most likely heard 2 additional HPR shots after the fatal head wound. He could only be truthful to a point.

Edited by Robert Mady
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Robert,

Where (physical location) exactly on Elm St. did Clint say the headshot (his 2nd shot heard) occur?

If you answer with Z313, then are you implying that the film in terms of frame extractions has not yet occurred?

If JFK is shot circa z190, are you trying to convince me that anybody (professionally) responsible for his protection didn't realize what had occurred when comparing it to the extant Zfilm from that point on?

So Clint, who was responsible for Jackie, didn't see the reaction (within the limo) from the 1st shot on JFK, reacted to the governor's action (some 5-6 seconds later), who was not representative of being shot yet, jumped off the limo.

In other words, JFK reaching toward his throat was less conspicuous than the governor lying back onto Nellie without another shot being fired as of that time.

chris

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HILL: "We were traveling about 12 to 15 miles per hour. On the left hand side was a grass area with a few people scattered along it observing the motorcade passing, and I was visually scanning these people when I heard a noise similar to a firecracker. The sound came from my right rear and I immediately moved my head in that direction. In so doing, my eyes had to cross the Presidential automobile and I saw the President hunch forward and then slump to his left. < these two sentences are not joined by an immediacy > I jumped from the Follow-up car and ran toward the Presidential automobile. < photographic evidence shows HILL was moving toward the limo prior to the occurrence of the fatal head wound and following the action of CONNALLY laying back on top of NELLIE > I heard a second firecracker type noise but it had a different sound-- like the sound of shooting a revolver into something hard. I saw the President slump more toward his left."

HILL does not provide details as to where the limo was when the first shot occurs other than "Well, as we came out of the curve, and began to straighten up" and no details on the second, the first shot causes JFK to react, the second causes the fatal head wound which occurred as HILL was moving toward the limo.

HILL tells us that he heard a noise which was similar to a 'firecracker' he does not take action for the same reason that no other agent reacted, because they were not alarmed by this sound and only four agents can be seen to have any response to this sound. If you have it in your brain that the first shot was a high powered rifle and that the agents should have reacted and protected the President you are not comprehending the mechanics of the assassination.

The second shot was around or at Z-313, correct.

Frames were removed prior to Z-313, with absolute certainly prior to Z-133 and frames with absolute certainly were remove after Z-313.

Did anyone realize JFK had been injured at circa Z-190...no.

Please watch the Z-film, and read JACKIES testimony, JACKIE does not turn because of the sound of a high powered rifle, she does not turn because of a noise, she turns because of CONNALLY YELLING "But then suddenly Governor Connally was yelling, "Oh, no, no, no.", when she turns she sees her husband with his hands at his neck, but JACKIES attention goes to CONNALLY until Z-290, when CONNALLY breaks contact and begins to lay back on top of NELLIE. JACKIE did not hear a noise and was not aware that her husband had been injurred. The same applies for every witness in DP. That does not mean some were not aware of odd behavior of the President with his hands to his throat.

IF KENNEDYS reaction was so conspicuous why didn't JACKIE cry out, she knew her husband better than anyone else in DP and was aware of the potential of an assassination on his life, she does not react until after KENNEDY is fatally wounded, why did she not react? May I offer that it would be the same reason that HILL did not react or READY or LANDIS or MCINTYRE or GREER or KELLERMAN or all SSA, because IF they heard the first noise they did not understand that it was threatening, the second noise heard was the first high powered rifle shot that occurred around z-313, which caused the fatal head wound, this is when reactions can be identified in the photographic media.

Animated gif of HILL

SPROCKET-5-HILL_zps2beec859.gif

HILL looks toward the limo after Z-190, he continues to look toward the limo until ~Z-240 when he is lost from sprocket hole image, in ALTGENS #6 HILL can be seen to still be looking toward the limo.

Yes KENNEDY reaching for his throat was less conspicuous than CONNALLY laying backward over the top of NELLIE.

Edited by Robert Mady
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CONNALLY claimed that when he turned, he saw that KENNEDY had been injured by the first shot. NELLIE also claimed to be aware that KENNEDY had been injured by the first shot, this Z-frame #286 corroborates this portion of their stories.

z286_zpsf42eb122.jpg

CONNALLY was uninjured when he laid back on top of NELLIE.

CONNALLY is injured after the fatal head shot (Z-film shows Z-325, but frames were removed from Z-film, YARBOROUGH opinion was about 3 seconds later, YOUNGBLOOD claimed all three shots happened within a few seconds)

324-323_zps2af5d390.gif

This gif is only frames Z-314 and Z-323 alternating every ~1/2 second, this is how fast CONNALLYS moved in the Zapruder film, from laying down to sitting forward, it is obvious frames were removed, this is the only conclusion that is even conceivable, without taking into account that CONNALLY was supposedly severely wounded and according to both NELLIE and CONNALLY had been in some state of shock at the time NELLIE pulled him down.

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I am no expert on dissecting Zapruder and timing of SS reactions. But it has always seemed to me that Connally had been hit right before the fatal head shot. He goes from turning around to leaning back in what looks like obvious pain. It doesn't look like he leans back to protect his wife. Its looks involuntary.

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Paul, if you explore the hypothesis that CONNALLY is injured after turning to look at KENNEDY and just prior to laying back on top of NELLIE, what explanation is there that will reasonably address the fact that CONNALLY would have been severely injured and supposedly dazed while laying on top of NELLIE but was somehow capable to leap off of NELLIE and do it as evidenced in the Zapruder film, in 1/2 of a second. Lay down in the back seat of a car and time yourself how long it takes to sit up. turn and crouch down facing forward, now place a person underneath you, they also have to do the same thing, including wait for you to get yourself off their body. But the CONNALLYs both accomplish this in 1/2 of a second, 0.5 seconds!

324-323_zps2af5d390.gif

How do you explain the actions of CONNALLY and NELLIE starting at Z-325 as CONNALLY appears to be driven down and to his left dislodging NELLIE from her location?

JCmovement_zpsa59c7764.gif

Edited by Robert Mady
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HILL: "We were traveling about 12 to 15 miles per hour. On the left hand side was a grass area with a few people scattered along it observing the motorcade passing, and I was visually scanning these people when I heard a noise similar to a firecracker. The sound came from my right rear and I immediately moved my head in that direction. In so doing, my eyes had to cross the Presidential automobile and I saw the President hunch forward and then slump to his left.

Robert quote "If you have it in your brain that the first shot was a high powered rifle and that the agents should have reacted and protected the President you are not comprehending the mechanics of the assassination."

It makes no difference to me what type of noise came from the first shot. What matters is Clint recognized a sound.

Did he not see JFK put his hands up to his throat after the first sound? Did any professional agents see JFK put his hands up to his throat after the first sound?

He only saw JFK hunch forward and slump to his left. Yet, this didn't raise any red flags among law enforcement, even without the hands to the throat action.

It makes more sense that Clint reacted to both an audible/visual stimulus, the limo slows down, Clint leaps off the Queen Mary.

An event which took place after extant Z255 (because of the Altgen's photo) and before the extant 313 headshot.

Footage not seen on the extant film. (Will cover this later in a new topic).

I do agree there is another shot after the extant 313 headshot, so at least a four shot scenario is valid. imo

chris

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David, HILL could have reacted to KENNEDY having raised his arms to his neck verses CONNALLY laying back on top of NELLIE, but the reason that this is less plausible is because KENNEDY can be seen to raise his hands to his neck as the limo emerges from behind the highway sign, about frame Z-225, HILL does not move toward the limo until after Z-300.

Z-290 is the timing of when CONNALLY starts to lay back on top of NELLIE.

You can see in ALTGENS #6 which is taken about frame Z-255, HILL is still looking toward the limo, he has not taken action, we do not see HILL again until frames in the Nix and Muchmore films where he can be seen moving from the follow up vehicle to the limo and the timing is just moments prior to the fatal head shot.

Logically if HILL had not reacted to KENNEDY upon hearing the noise at Z-190 or seeing KENNEDY react by Z-225, why would he have finally reacted at ~Z-300? What changed? CONNALLY laid back on top of NELLIE. Remember JACKIE made no indications that help was needed or that her husband was in distress, she was unaware that KENNEDY had been injured, why would HILL have reacted?

But when CONNALLY laid down, this must have been alarming. A passenger laying down in the Presidential limo must have been terrifying to HILL and other SSA that were monitoring the odd actions of the CONNALLYS and KENNEDYS in the back of the limo.

Edited by Robert Mady
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Chris, are you projecting how you believe the SSA should have reacted?

When we look at the photographic evidence with hindsight we know that KENNEDY was injured by the first shot, no witness in DP realized this, including JACKIE. Witnesses continued to smile, wave and applaud the President until the fatal head shot occurs, this is a fact.

No witnesses that heard the first noise including four SSA comprehended the first noise was a threat. We don't know what short of noise this was, it was termed a 'noise' or 'firecracker' like, it could have been a very soft popping sound, there are ambient noises outside, four SSA were alerted by this noise and first looked in the direction they believed the noise originated from, they obviously did not detect danger and another noise was not forthcoming.

Remember, HILL's report is created from hindsight and he is also omitting evidence detrimental to the governments cover story.

There was communication between the Queen Mary and the limo, it would seem obvious that there was an agreement for GREER to slow the limo to allow HILL to transfer to the limo, the limo was at a location where they should have been accelerating, HILL would not have jumped off the follow-up vehicle if he had believed he would not have been able to catch an accelerating limo. We also know with absolute certainty that GREER was decelerating the limo at the time HILL was moving between the vehicles and prior to the fatal head shot. All of these pieces of evidence are not isolated random coincidences they all form a pattern that tells the story of what was happening. You must piece them together in a reasonable and logical manner to understand what happened during the assassination.

Edited by Robert Mady
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When the Zapruder Film / Nix Film / Muchmore Film is analyzed we can determine definitively the following:

1) CONNALLY begins to lay back on top of NELLIE at Z-290.

2) The limo is decelerating by Z-304, evidence by PO HARGIS and MARTIN overtaking the limo as seen in sprocket hole areas.

3) HILL is seen moving between the follow up vehicle and the limo prior to Z-313 or the head shot occurring. We do not see HILL leap off the follow-up vehicle, I would think this could be closely determined by someone so as to narrow the timing down to show the action started very close to Z-300.

All of these events are tied together they are not random coincidences unless you insist the assassination consists of only unrelated random yet coincidental events.

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Within testimony is truths if one understands the proper perspective to view the assassination, truths can be identified.

Give truth some consideration.

Pat posted "When one actually reads the statements of these men one finds 1) the "antics taking place on the sidewalk" was in fact a fellow newsman dropping film thrown to him by Jackson. 2) Jackson and the other newsmen said the first shot rang out AFTER this incident."

Posted was graphic evidence proving these newsmen were busy watching the antics on the sidewalk at least until Z-249.

The newsmen claimed the first shot they heard happened AFTER watching the antics.

Reason and logic dictate that according to these witnesses the first shot they heard had to have occurred sometime after Z-249.

They all claimed to have heard three shots.

This portion of their testimony follows the 'Assassination Four Shot Model'; the first shot was silent, these men did not hear it because we know with all certainty the first shot came before Z-249.

This in itself proves the first shot was silenced, that not many witnesses heard it.

The first shot these witnesses could have possibly have heard had to have come at Z-313, then two more shots followed.

"When one actually reads the statements" actually reading the statements is not enough, one needs to understand what is being said.

Although these men lied about shots coming from the TSBD, there is still valuable information within their testimonies that can help define the assassination such as timing of the shots and that there were more than three shots fired during the assassination and that at least one was silenced and three where from a high powered rifle that occurred after Z-312.

First of all, Jackson indicated that they were still laughing about the "antics" when they heard the first shot, so there is no contradiction between your impression they were watching antics at Z-249 and that the first shot was fired prior to Z-249.

Second of all, are you actually claiming the Hughes film continues on till Z-249, and that no shots were heard prior to Z-312?

Here are the statements of the reporters in the four press cars following the Cabell car, which was just entering the intersection of Houston and Elm at Z-190. Note that Dave Wiegman, in the second car, claimed that he started filming after the second shot, and that everyone of whom I am aware agrees he began filming before Z-312.

Press car #1, the pool car.

Merriman Smith, a reporter for UPI, sat next to the driver of the blue Impala. After the shots rang out, he picked up the car phone and called the Dallas UPI bureau. As a result his first reports were on the wire before the president's limo even reached the hospital. (11-22-63, 12:34, earliest UPI teletype) "Three shots were fired at President Kennedy's motorcade in downtown Dallas." (11-22-63, 12:39 UPI teletype) “Kennedy seriously wounded, perhaps seriously, perhaps fatally, by assassin's bullet." (11-22-63, 12:45 UPI teletype) "Reporters about five car lengths behind the Chief Executive heard what sounded like three bursts of gunfire. Secret Service agents in a follow-up car quickly unlimbered their automatic rifles. The bubble top of the President's car was down. They drew their pistols, but the damage was done. The President was slumped over in the backseat of the car face down. Connally lay on the floor of the rear seat. It was impossible to tell at once where Kennedy was hit, but bullet wounds in Connally's chest were plainly visible, indicating the gunfire might possibly have come from an automatic weapon. There were three loud bursts. Dallas motorcycle officers escorting the President quickly leaped from their bikes and raced up a grassy knoll." (11-22-63, 12:46 UPI teletype) “It was impossible to tell at once where Kennedy was hit, but bullet wounds in Connally’s chest were plainly visible, indicating the gunfire might possibly have come from an automatic weapon. There were three loud bursts. Dallas motorcycle officers escorting the President quickly leaped from their bikes and raced up a grassy hill.” (11-22-63, a 12:54 Smith dispatch to UPI) “Some of the Secret Service agents thought the gunfire was from an automatic weapon fired to the right rear of the president's car, probably from a grassy knoll to which police rushed." (11-22-63 statement regarding the number of shots while on the flight back from Dallas, as recalled by reporter Charles Roberts in The Truth About the Assassination, 1967) "Smith had heard three." (Smith’s 11-23-63 Pulitzer-prize winning eyewitness account, published in hundreds of papers) “The procession cleared the center of the business district and turned into a handsome highway that wound through what appeared to be a park. I was riding in the so-called White House press “pool” car, a telephone company vehicle equipped with a mobile radio-telephone. I was in the front seat between a driver from the Telephone Company and Malcolm Kilduff, acting White House press secretary for the President’s Texas tour. Three other pool reporters were wedged in the back seat. Suddenly we heard three loud, almost painfully loud cracks. The first sounded as if it might have been a large firecracker. But the second and third blasts were unmistakable. Gunfire. The President’s car, possibly as much as 150 or 200 yards ahead, seemed to falter briefly. We saw a flurry of activity in the Secret Service follow-up car behind the Chief Executive’s bubble-top limousine…Our car stood still for probably only a few seconds, but it seemed like a lifetime.” (4-14-64 interview with William Manchester, as represented in The Death of a President, 1967) "Smith was not as astute a reporter as he seemed. Despite extensive experience with weapons he had thought the sounds in the plaza were three shots from an automatic weapon, and in a subsequent message he identified them as 'bursts.'" (11-14-66 UPI article found in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. This version of the article was published in the 11-20-66 Washington Post as well.) “I was only a few hundred feet from John F. Kennedy when he was shot in Dallas. I would swear there were three shots and only three shots fired at his motorcade. The car In which I rode as a press association reporter was not far from the presidential vehicle Itself, and in clear view of it. We were at the point of coming out of an underpass when the first shot was fired. The sound was not entirely crisp and it seemed for a split second like a firecracker, a big one. As we cleared the underpass, then came the second and third shots. The shots were fired smoothly and evenly. There was not the slightest doubt on the front seat of our car that the shots came from a rifle to our rear (and the Book Depository at this point was directly to our rear). We remarked about rifle fire before we knew what had happened to Kennedy, although we had seen him slide from view in the rear of the open White House car...Clint Hill, the Secret Service agent who raced from the follow-up car to the presidential vehicle to shield the fallen leader and his shocked wife, Jacqueline, heard only three shots.” (11-14-66 UPI article found in the Bucks County Courier Times, with the references to the underpass removed from the more prevalent version above. Presumably, an alert editor at this paper caught Smith's mistake.) "I was only a few hundred feet from John F. Kennedy when he was shot in Dallas. I would swear there were three shots and only three fired at his motorcade. The car In which I rode as a press association reporter was not far from the presidential vehicle Itself, and in clear view of it when the first shot was fired. The sound was not entirely crisp and it seemed for a split second like a firecracker, a big one. Then came the second and third shots. The shots were fired smoothly and evenly. There was not the slightest doubt on the front seat of our car that the shots came from a rifle to our rear (and the Book Depository at this point was directly to our rear). We remarked about rifle fire before we knew what had happened to Kennedy, although we had seen him slide from view in the rear of the open White House car."

Jack Bell, a reporter for the Associated Press was in the back seat. (11-22-63 AP Bulletin, marked as 12:41 PCS) "Bell reported three shots were fired as the motorcade entered the triple underpass, which leads to the Stemmons Freeway route to Parkland Hospital." (11-22-63 news bulletin on WBAP, moments later) "Bell of the Associated Press says that three shots were fired as the motorcade entered the triple underpass which leads to the Stemmons Freeway route to Parkland Hospital." (11-22-63 news bulletin on WBAP, around 1:00) "Associated Press reporter Jack Bell says the President and Connally were shot as the motorcade entered a triple underpass that leads to the Stemmons Freeway. Bell said a man and a woman were scrambling on an upper level of a walkway that leads to the underpass." (11-23-63 AP article in the Christchurch Star. Christchurch is in New Zealand, 18 hours ahead of Dallas. This was an afternoon paper. As a consequence, this article must have been written within a few hours of the shooting.) “The assassination took place near a three-highway intersection close to the business area of the city. Within seconds of the shooting, Mr. Kennedy slumped over in the back seat of the car, face down. Mr. Connally lay on the floor of the rear seat. Three bursts of gunfire, apparently from automatic weapons, were heard. Secret service men immediately unslung their automatic weapons and pistols. Mrs. Kennedy and the Governor’s wife, who was also in the car, both crouched over the inert forms of their husbands as the car sped towards the hospital.” (11-22-63 eyewitness account written for the Associated Press, found in the 11-22-63 Spokane Spokesman-Review and the 11-23-63 New York Times) "There was a loud bang as though a giant firecracker had exploded in the caverns between the tall buildings we were just leaving behind us. In quick succession there were two other loud reports...The reports sounded like rifle shots. The man in front of me shouted 'My God, they're shooting at the president!' Our driver braked the car sharply and we swung the doors open to leap out. Suddenly the procession, which had halted, shot forward again...As my eye swept the buildings to the right, where the shots--if they really were shots, and it seemed unbelievable--might have come, I saw no significant sign of activity." (Upon arrival at Parkland) "By the time I had covered the distance to the presidential car, Secret Service Men were helping Mrs. Kennedy away. Hospital attendants were aiding Mr. and Mrs. Connally. For an instant I stopped and stared into the back seat. There, face, down, stretched out at full length, lay the President, motionless. His natty business suit seemed hardly rumpled. But there was blood on the floor." (11-22-64 AP article found in the Ada Oklahoma Evening News) "As the motorcade made a right turn off the packed street, suddenly there were only a few waving spectators. Ahead, we rode toward a left turn into a street which led to an underpass. Nearby was a building with a sign which read: 'Texas School Book Depository.' The President's auto, four cars ahead, already had made the turn toward the underpass and we had just completed it when there was a loud report. My first thought was: Those Texans, now they're shooting off giant firecrackers. Then came two more reports, paced possibly five seconds apart. They had the ominous sound of rifle crack. The President's car had stopped. We reporters riding 'pool' scrambled to get out to run ahead. But at almost that instant, a Secret Service man, riding in the front seat of the presidential limousine stood up, phone in hand, and waved the preceding police cruiser on. In that numb moment we all sensed that something horrible might have happened." (4-19-66 Oral History interview performed for the Kennedy Library) "We turned a corner, and there was the Texas Book Depository. Then we turned another corner heading toward an underpass. I thought somebody had set off a cherry bomb. I thought to myself, 'My God, these Texans don't ever know when to quit. They've given the man everything they could. Here they are shooting off firecrackers and cherry bombs.' About three seconds later there was another report, and then there was a third one. By that time everybody thought this was a rifle shooting. So we started to jump out of the car...We started to get out. There was an assistant White House press secretary in there, too. He yelled out as we were just getting out, 'My God, they’re shooting at the President!' We all thought this was probably true, but we didn’t know.There was no way of finding out at this point what was happening because Kennedy’s car was four cars ahead, and we couldn’t see it clearly. And then the motorcade began to move, so we all jumped back in the car. It moved very fast." (11-23-66 AP article found in the Oil City Pennsylvania Derrick) "Three years ago in a sunny midday in Dallas I heard from the fourth car in a motorcade the sound of three rifle shots that killed a president and wounded a governor. There was the sound of three cadenced shots—no more, no fewer. As our car bearing four newsmen, a presidential press aide and a driver turned left in front of the Texas School Book Depository, the first of these rang out. The sound came from above and to our right. It echoed down the canyon-like block of moderately tall buildings behind us. I remember thinking that some over-enthusiastic Dallasite must have exploded a cherry bomb. Then there was a second crack, unmistakably that of a rifle. It was followed in about five seconds by a third. Then there was a moment of awful silence, broken by shrill cries and screams. People scurried toward whatever protection they could find. As we scrambled back into our car, the motorcade, which had halted, was moving again. Up ahead I saw a man, looking fearfully back over his shoulder and the book depository building, push a woman down on the grassy knoll that led to an overpass and throw his body protectively over hers. The sounds of the three shots had come from above and to the right of us. To one who had been familiar with shooting ranges they sounded like the cadenced quick fire of an experienced rifleman squeezing off a shot, re-loading by bolt action, firing again and a third time..."

Robert Baskin, a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, was also in the back seat. (11-23-63 article in the Dallas Morning News) "As the presidential motorcade approached the triple underpass, at the height of the paved hill at Elm and Houston, I was in the 'pool' car three cars back of the President. The President's car had just passed the Texas State Book Depository building when we heard a shot, off to the right. It seemed to come from rather high up. Then we heard two more shots, carefully measured, as though a calm, determined sharp shooter were at work. The Presidential caravan ground to a halt, and suddenly there was a great deal of activity around the President's car. But the impact of the awful act didn't register until we saw people falling down on the streets and frantically trying to find cover. Then we realized it was actual gun fire we had heard." (11-23-63 article in the Dallas Morning News, apparently a re-write of his original account) "Then came the approach to the triple underpass, with the leading cars picking up speed as the crowd thinned out. Over to our right loomed the gaunt structure labeled the Texas School Book Depository. It was 12:30 p.m. The sharp crack of a rifle rang out. But at that moment we couldn't believe it was just that. "What the hell was that?" someone in the car asked. Then there were two more shots, measured carefully. We saw people along the street diving for the ground. Several persons shielded children. Then we knew that the presidential party was under fire. The motorcade ground to a halt. There was a good bit of activity around the President’s car, with Secret Service men running about. Before we could get out of our car, however, police sirens began wailing loudly. The President’s car started up and quickly was going at breakneck speed." (5-15-64 interview with William Manchester, as represented in The Death of a President, 1967) (On the first shot) "Bob Baskin, in his seat behind Kilduff, knew what it was; he was an infantry veteran of the 85th Division, and he looked around wildly for cover." (3-16-74 interview with the Johnson Library) "We heard the first shot ring out and...I instinctively thought it was a rifle shot. Then the other shots followed and I was convinced it was rifle fire. But then this commotion started around the President's car and people were falling to the ground over there. And our press car came to a halt and we were throwing open the back doors to get out, and all of a sudden the thing began to move, and we moved down fast to Parkland." (11-19-78 Dallas Morning News article on the 15th anniversary, based in part on a previously unpublished Baskin account from 1963) "We turned off Main Street and onto Houston for the last leg of the motorcade route to the Trade Mart at almost 12:30. We saw the President's car make the turn onto Elm in front of the Texas School Book Depository, gaining a bit of speed. The press car was halfway down the block before the left turn when the first shots rang out. "What the hell was that?" one of us asked. The motorcade kept moving and we had just turned the corner for the approach to the triple underpass some four seconds later when a second and then a third shot were heard. We came to a halt. Ahead we could see considerable movement around the President's car but couldn't make out what it was all about."

Bob Clark, a reporter for ABC News, was in the back seat as well. (Phoned-in report on ABC, 11-22-63) “Three shots were fired at the President’s motorcade as it passed out of the downtown area of Dallas...The shots rang out as the motorcade had entered an open area just beyond the main downtown business district. It was impossible to determine where the shots had come from.” (Phoned-in recap, broadcast around 2:10 PM, 11-22-63) "We had just rounded the corner at the fringe of the business district when three shots suddenly rang out. They sounded at this stage like an automobile backfiring. They were extremely loud...We heard the shots very clearly but it was almost inconceivable at this stage that this was an assassination. Then three or four seconds elapsed before the car that the president was traveling in--this car came to an immediate stop. The Secret Service follow-up car--some of the agents piled out then almost immediately leaped back in." (6-3-96 interview on C-Span) "When Oswald fired the shots, I was in the pool car, about the sixth car back from the President, about maybe 250 or 300 feet behind the President. But our car was just making the turn underneath the window where Oswald was firing. So in our car the sounds of the shots were very loud and very clear, and what was to become more significant historically, equally loud and clear. So we all felt after the first one, the first was just a loud noise--it might have been a firecracker or something. But with the next two shots we all knew they were shots and we all knew they came from very close to us, up above and again almost directly overhead." (3-4-03 Interview conducted for President Kennedy Has Been Shot, 2003) “When (Merriman Smith) said those were gunshots, I think we all in the car just accepted they were gunshots. They were loud and clear and more significant—for the historical record—they were equally loud and equally clear and were clearly fired from almost over our head.” (11-20-03 article on Gwhatchet.com reporting on a meeting of the National Press Club) "'Right as we turned in front of the Texas School Book Depository I heard three extremely loud and clear shots,' said Clark, referring to the building from which suspected assassin Lee Harvey Oswald reportedly fired three shots. Clark told the audience of 100 that he and other journalists were unaware of exactly what happened because they could not see the presidential limousine."

Press car #2

John Hoefen, an NBC sound technician, sat in the middle of the front seat of the following car, the first of three Chevrolet convertibles reserved for the Press. (11-22-63 phoned-in report broadcast on NBC radio--WBAP in Dallas--at approximately 1:50) "We were just leaving the business district of Dallas when this shooting took place...We were making a sweeping curve here on a roadway approaching a freeway when the first shot rang out. Our first reaction was that some teenager had fired a cherry-bomb. When the second one rang out, we sort of felt that there was something wrong up there. People started to drop down to the ground ahead of us, roughly 50 to 60 feet up near the President's car. Then there was a third and if I remember correctly a fourth shot. Immediately, after that last shot the President's car took off in a tremendous burst of speed followed by the Secret Service follow-up car..." (11-22-63 phoned-in report broadcast on NBC television, at approximately 2:00 PM) “We were approaching a drive which would put us on a freeway, where we would then drive to the Trade Mart...As we turned down this moderate curve here there was a loud shot. At first we thought it was a cherry bomb by some teenager. Then it was immediately followed by two or three more. Everybody said "duck" then there were people falling to the ground. We did not know who was shot. Ladies and men both were screaming..." (Hoefen's report as summarized by NBC in its 1966 book 70 hours and 30 Minutes) "Hoefen reports that he was in the motorcade with the Presidential party…A loud shot rang out; people ducked; men and women were screaming.”

Dave Wiegman, an NBC cameraman, sat on the right side of the front seat, next to Hoefen. (Pictures of the Pain, p.371-372, Trask interview 3-18-89) “We were in a straight away heading down to what I now know as the Book Depository, and I heard the first report and I thought like everybody else that it was a good sized fire cracker—a cherry bomb. Then when I heard the second one, the adrenaline really started pumping because there was a reaction in the motorcade. I was sitting on the edge of the (car door) frame, which I sometimes did. I keenly remember right after the incident that my feet were on the ground during one of the reports. I don’t think I was fast enough to react to the second, but I think on the third one I was running. The car had slowed down enough for me to jump out…I jumped and I remember running and I heard the third shot … I’d done this before in other motorcades because a lot of times the President will stop and do something …The motorcade has stopped, plus you heard a report. I don’t think I thought on the first or second, but when the third one went off, I really thought I felt the compression on my face.” (Interview on the Discovery Channel program Unsolved History, 2004) “I felt the third shot, actually the compression on my face, knew then it was not any cherry bomb. I decided that I’ve gotta run forward. This car’s not going fast enough, so I swung my other leg out and ran very quickly—fast—and I turned on the camera figuring that the camera could see at least what I’m seeing.”

Thomas Craven, a cameraman for CBS News, sat on the left side of the back seat. (Pictures of the Pain p.371, Trask interview 5-23-85) “It was just as we were making the turn. We thought it was a motorcycle backfiring”…Craven believes he heard three shots, but adds,” To tell the truth, I wouldn’t be really positive. I could have sworn they were backfires.”

Cleve Ryan, an electrician assigned to the press pool, sat in the middle of the back seat. No comments by Ryan on the shooting have been located.

Thomas Atkins, a cameraman working for the White House, sat on the right side of the rear seat. (As quoted in the tabloid Midnight, 3-1-77) “The car I was in had just made the little right turn. I was facing the Texas School Book Depository and Kennedy's car had just made the left turn heading toward the freeway entrance. Although I did not look up at the building, I could hear everything quite clearly. The shots came from below and off to the right side from where I was. I never thought the shots came from above. They did not sound like shots coming from anything higher than street level. They all sounded similar to me and did not seem to be coming from different points around the plaza. At first I thought it was a firecracker going off and I thought that whoever threw that thing at the motorcade is going to be in a heck of a lot of trouble with the Secret Service. Then when I heard the second shot, I realized it was gunfire. The third shot came very quickly after that, in less than two seconds, I'm sure. In thinking about it later, I got the distinct impression that it was almost like a little kid playing cowboys and Indians, the sounds came so close together. That is, between the second and third shots. It was bang...bang, bang. Like kids playing. That's exactly how I remember it.” (Pictures of the Pain p.371, Trask interview 3-19-86) “we came to the end (of Main Street) and made the right hand turn, and were going directly at the Depository. Just as we turned, I remember looking at my watch…as I looked at my watch I heard an explosion. The thought that ran through my mind, “Oh brother—somebody lit a cherry bomb”… And then immediately following there were two more quick explosions, and my stomach just went into a knot. The explosions were very loud, like they were right in front of me… (On describing the three shots) You know when kids play cowboys and Indians and they go Bam—Bam Bam! The last two clustered together.”

Press car #3:

Clint Grant, a Dallas Morning News photographer, sat in the middle of the front seat. (Pictures of the Pain p.398, letter Grant to Trask 12-1-85) “we had just turned onto Houston Street when we heard one shot—pause—two shots in rapid succession. I thought it was someone playing a prank—maybe a kid’s cherry bomb.” (11-21-93 Reporters Remember journalism conference, as quoted in Reporting the Kennedy Assassination) “as we turned the corner at Main and Houston, I heard three shots ring out.”

Frank Cancellare, a UPI photographer, sat on the right side of the front seat. (Pictures of the Pain p.398, Letter Cancellare to Trask, (3) 1985) “I did not know what happened. I knew something had been attempted and the police and secret service were doing all they could. Police ran their bikes up the bank towards the railroad overpass. I thought they were chasing the culprit.”

Cecil Stoughton, a photographer working for the White House, sat on the left side of the back seat. (3-1-71 interview with the Johnson Library)"We hadn't gotten to the corner yet. When we did get to the corner from Main turning onto Elm, the President's car must have just rounded the corner, and by the time we were halfway up that one block street, we heard these shots, which were obvious shots to my compatriots and I, sitting on the back of the convertible, wide open. We all looked around, and I made a remark to the extent: "These Texans really know how to give you a salute. They're probably firing off their .45's or firecrackers or something like that." It's just some kind of a noisy thing. But they were so definitely shots that it just worried me for a little bit." (Pictures of the Pain, p.38, based upon Trask interview 7-10-85) “Just after Stoughton’s car had made its turn at the Old Court House, he heard three very distinct, loud reports, which sounded like shots.” (5-31-98 article in the Victoria Advocate) "Just a few cars behind Kennedy in the motorcade, the Air Force captain wasn't quite certain what had caused Kennedy's car to race away. 'We had to ask someone on the side of the street what had happened,' Stoughton said."

Arthur Rickerby, a Life Magazine photographer, sat in the middle of the back seat. (Danbury News Times, 11-23-63, as quoted in Pictures of the Pain p. 398) “We heard what sounded like a giant firecracker go off. With that we saw people diving to the ground, covering up their children, or scurrying up the banks.” (3-20-85 letter from Mrs. Wanda Rickerby to Trask, as quoted in Pictures of the Pain) “He often stated his disagreement with the number of shots that were reported in the press.”

Henry Burroughs, an AP photographer, sat on the right side of the back seat. (Pictures of the Pain p.398, based on Trask interview 8-21-85) "Burroughs remembers hearing four shots…'We came up to the scene of the shooting and people were running all over the place.'” (10-14-98 letter to Vince Palamara quoted in JFK: The Medical Evidence Reference) “After the President’s limousine turned the corner at the book depository we could not see him, but we heard the shots, and the motorcade stopped.”

Press car#4:

James Underwood, a cameraman for KRLD, sat in the front seat of camera car #3, which has just rounded the corner onto Houston Street at frame 160 of the Zapruder film. (11-22-63 CBS news report, broadcast about 30 minutes after the assassination) “As we made the turn here at the intersection of Elm and Houston I heard first a loud report. It sounded to me like a giant firecracker. Then in quick succession two more. Immediately in front of me, I saw people begin to fall on the grass and run for bushes in a park area here.” (11-25-63 FBI report, CD5 p. 17) “Mr. Underwood states the car in which he was riding was approaching the corner of Houston and Elm Streets…when he heard a loud noise sounding similar to a gunshot. He states that upon hearing the second noise he realized it was a gunshot and that at the sound of the next shot the car in which he was riding was almost directly in front of the Texas School Book Depository Building. (4-1-64 testimony before the Warren Commission, 6H 167-171) “After we turned onto Houston Street, the car I was in was about, as far as I can remember, about in the middle of the block or a little bit north of the center of the block, which is a short block, when I heard the first shot…I thought it was an explosion. I have heard many rifles fired but it did not sound like a rifle to me. Evidently it must have been the reverberations of the buildings or something. I believe I said to one of the other fellows it sounded like a giant firecracker and the car I was in was about the intersection of Elm and Houston when I heard a second shot fired and moments later a third shot fired and I realized they were by that time, the last two shots, I realized they were coming from overhead …By the time the third shot was fired, the car I was in stopped almost through the intersection in front of the Texas School Book Depository Building and I leaped out of the car before the car stopped…our car was in the intersection, in the intersection of Elm and Houston Street…It had partially made the turn or had just begun to make the turn.”

Tom Dillard, a Dallas Morning News photographer, sat in the right front seat of camera car #3. He took photographs of the school book depository after the shots. (11-25-63 FBI report, CD5, p.16) “Mr. Dillard stated the car in which he was riding had not approached the corner of Houston and Elm Streets when he heard a noise sounding like a “torpedo” (a large firecracker). He states upon hearing another sound similar to the first he realized it was gunfire. He states that upon hearing the third shot the car in which he was riding was stopped almost in front of the Texas School Book Depository Building.” (4-1-64 testimony before the Warren Commission, 6H162-167) (When asked if he heard an explosion as they were driving north on Houston) “Yes, sir, I heard an explosion…I believe I said “My God, they’ve thrown a torpedo”…about 3 or 4 seconds, another explosion and my comment was “No, it’s heavy rifle fire”…I heard three, the three approximately equally spaced.” (When asked exactly where they were on Houston when they heard the first shots) “just a few feet around the corner and it seems we had slowed a great deal. It seems that our car had slowed down so that we were moving rather slowly and perhaps just passed the turn when I heard the first explosion." (Report of an HSCA investigator's 2-8-78 interview of Dillard, found online) "The President's car turned left on Elm off of Houston and Dillard's car was about at the County Jail House. When Dillard heard the first shot, he said, "my God, they're throwing torpedos (fire crackers) at him!" When the second shot went off, Dillard knew it was a high velocity rifle. Dillard stated that they were just about to the corner of Houston and Elm when the third shot went off. Bob Jackson said, "there he is in the sixth floor window!" Dillard pointed his camera up and took a picture. Dillard jumped out of his car ran down Elm to take photos but could only get the rear of the vehicles as they sped off. Dillard then jumped back on his car and he did not know for sure that anyone had been hit...Mr. Dillard stated that there was no doubt that he heard three shots and all three shots came from the TSBD. He stated that as they got to the corner of Houston and Elm, he could smell gun powder very clearly." (7-19-93 oral history for the Sixth Floor Museum) “We were on Houston...sitting, chatting...and this gun went off. It was loud, and I said, "They're throwing torpedoes at him." In my mind, it was those things we threw as kids that hit the sidewalk and exploded. Then, in a matter of a second and a half, another shot. I said, "No, that's rifle fire." [After] the third shot, I said, "My God, they've killed him." (11-20-2000 eyewitness account in the Dallas Morning News) "The parade continued through downtown. My car had just turned north on Houston Street and was at the County Jail entrance when the first shot was fired. I said, 'They've thrown a torpedo.' At the second shot, 'No, it's heavy rifle fire' and at the third shot I said, 'They've killed him.' The President's car had turned west on Elm before the shooting started, so we were unable to see what had happened around the corner. Bob Jackson, a photographer in my car, said, There's the rifle in that open window. In the three or four seconds it took me to locate the particular open window and make a picture, the rifle had been withdrawn. I made two shots of the building before we turned the corner to Elm. When we turned the corner, there were people lying and crouched on the ground and others running up the grass slope. I jumped out of my car and made two pix of the area which by then was clear of people."

Jimmy Darnell, a cameraman for WBAP, sat on the back seat behind the driver. (12-2-63 FBI report, CD7 p.29) “stated he heard the first shot and thought it was a backfire from an automobile. The second shot he thought was a firecracker. He stated, however, after the second shot he realized from the confusion that something had happened and he jumped out of the car and ran towards the President’s car...He said he noticed parents were throwing children to the ground and covering them with their bodies.”

Malcolm Couch, a cameraman for WFAA, was sitting in the middle of the back seat of camera car #3. He filmed the aftermath of the shots as the car crossed the Plaza. (11-22-63 eyewitness report on WFAA at approximately 1:45 PM) “Just as the President’s car turned the corner, I heard a loud shot that sounded like at first a backfire. And then I heard another one. And then finally a third shot. We naturally took this third shot as a rifle shot because we figured by the third shot that this was not a backfire, that it was not a motorcycle backfiring, but it was actually someone taking a crack at the President. Just as our car rounded the corner we saw the President’s car speed off. I had my camera in my hand and raised it to see an officer fall and pull his pistol. I took a shot of that, and then to my right, two ladies fell to the ground and one of them had fainted. People were running here and there, hither and yarn. Up in a window, I saw--I could not tell what the person looked like, but I saw the rifle being pulled back into the window. This was the fifth or sixth floor. There were people underneath the rifle who looked up to see where the shots had come from. One man started running down the street with his little boy, his little child. And police started running after him thinking he was the man that had fired the shots. There was much confusion around there. I noticed on the sidewalk, Walt, some blood. At this time, I do not know whose blood it was. But there was some blood on the sidewalk. Away from the street. It must not have been the President's blood.” (11-22-63 eyewitness report on WFAA, at approximately 3:00 PM) "I was in the 8th car in the motorcade. There were 5 other newsmen, myself, in the car. We'd just rounded a corner and the President's car was heading out of downtown proper. We were at right angles to the President's car, about approximately 50-75 feet away. I heard this shot, or what had sounded like at the moment to be a motorcycle backfiring, and I heard another one, and by the third shot, it sounded by then, the men in the car realized it was not a motorcycle, but it was someone firing. Our car rounded the corner just as the President's car sped off down underneath an underpass and out onto what is known as Stemmon's Expressway. I looked to the left of me as a policeman fell, pulled a pistol. To the right of me two citizens dropped to the ground, and I had chance to take a quick shot of the window from which the assassin had fired his weapon." (11-27-63 FBI report, CD5 p.18) “He said they…were traveling the presidential route on Houston Street when he heard two loud noises about ten seconds apart which sounded like a motorcycle backfire. He said as they turned the corner onto Elm from Houston, he heard another noise, and Robert Jackson yelled to look up at the window." (4-1-64 testimony before the Warren Commission, 6H153-162) “we turned north onto Houston, and it was there that we heard the first gunshot…It sounded like a motorcycle backfire at first—the first time we heard it—the first shot.” (When asked where on Houston they heard this) “I would say, uh, 15 or 20 feet from the turn—from off of Main onto Houston…We had already completed the turn…I was looking back to a fellow on my—that would be on my right—I don’t know who it was—we were joking. We had just made the turn. And I heard the first shot…there was no particular reaction…And—uh—then—in a few seconds, I guess from 4-5 seconds later or even less, we heard the second shot…we began to look in front of us…By the third shot, I felt that it was a rifle…as I said the shots or the noises were fairly close together, they were fairly even in sound. (When asked where they were when they heard the third shot) I’d say we were about 50 feet from making—or maybe 60 feet—from making the left hand turn onto Elm.” (11-22-64 WFAA program A Year Ago Today) "As we turned the fateful corner, our senses were numb and our hearts seemed to stop beating as we heard the shots ring out. The photographer from Dallas, who slammed his elbow into my right side, yelled 'Look up in the window, there's the rifle.' And straight in front of us we could see the Texas School Book Depository Building and almost to the top floor there was the gleaming gun barrel sticking out of a window. The next few seconds were frantic. People were running. People were screaming. People falling to the ground." (Article found in the Clifton Record entitled JFK Shooting Recalled: Local Resident, Former TV Reporter Remembers Kennedy Assassination. Couch's Memories Remain Clear 37 Years Later, 11-22-00) "We had reached the end of the narrow corridor where most of the crowd had gathered, and had just made a turn to the right to go down Houston Street. As cameramen, we could relax for a few minutes. Just 100 yards ahead, the president's car took a westerly turn down Elm Street to go beneath an underpass. Beyond the underpass was clear highway to the Trade Mart, where the presidential party would have lunch. Putting down my camera, I remarked, 'Boy, what a beautiful day for a parade!. Everything is going perfect, too.' Hardly had I finished when we heard a sharp CRACK. It sounded like a motorcycle backfiring, or a firecracker. Then a second or so later, another CRACK. People began to run and scream. The reporter next to me jabbed me in the ribs. 'Look,' he yelled, 'Up in the window...a rifle!' He was pointing straight in front of us to the Texas School Book Depository Building. There on the fifth or sixth story, I saw about a foot of a rifle being drawn back into a window. Then our car turned sharply down Elm Street. I began taking pictures of people running, falling to the ground, and screaming." (11-22-03 article in the Dallas Morning News) “Jackson had taken his last picture and handed his film to Jim Featherston, a reporter waiting to receive it at the corner of Main and Houston. When the heavyset reporter fumbled it and began to chase after it, the men in the car found themselves laughing. And then came the first shot. Couch remembers someone shouting: 'Look at the window—there’s the rifle!' By the time the third shot rang out, Couch had spotted about eight inches of the rifle protruding from the sixth-floor window.” (Oral History interview performed for the Sixth Floor Museum, 4-2-07) "As we were starting the turn, facing the building, we heard a ka-pow. At first, well it could be motorcycle backfire, because all these cops were around us on motorcycles. And then another second or so, ka-pow. And whoever was sitting by me--and I really want to get this straight--hollered "Look up at the window; there's a rifle!" And we were facing the building at that point. And I looked up for about a split second and saw about a foot of the rifle going back in the window. It wasn't sticking out of the window, but it was visible in the window. It was just almost like that. And then another ka-pow. Pardon me, another couple of ka-pows. By then, by the time of the second ka-pow, going to the third and fourth, we really started to realize something was wrong. And that's when I looked up and saw the rifle go in the window."

Robert Jackson, a Dallas Times Herald photographer, was sitting on the right rear seat of the car. (11-23-63 AP article) “When we heard the first shot, the president had already turned the corner. We had not made the corner yet. Then we heard two more shots.” (11-23-63 AP article found in the L.A. Times) "Bob Jackson, a photographer for the Dallas Times Herald, heard one shot, then two rapid bursts as he rode in an open convertible in the presidential motorcade." (11-23-63 FBI report, CD5 p.15) “he advised the car in which he was riding was proceeding north on Houston Street…and the presidential car had already turned left on Elm Street…when he heard three loud reports which sounded like shots from a gun. He stated that there was a “pause” after the first shot, followed by the second and third shots in rapid succession. Jackson advised that upon hearing the three shots, he looked upward and straight ahead at a window in the Texas School Book Depository…in time to see the barrel of a rifle being pulled inside the window.” (3-10-64 testimony before the Warren Commission, 2H155-165) “I was in the process of unloading a camera and I was to toss it out of the car as we turned right onto Houston Street to one of our reporters…And that I did as we turned the corner…as I threw it out the wind blew it, caught it and blew it out into the street and our reporter chased it out into the street, and the photographers in our car, one of the photographers, was a TV cameraman whom I do not recall as his name , and he was joking about the film being thrown out and he was shooting my picture of throwing the film out… Well as our reporter chased that film out in the street, we all looked back at him and were laughing, and it was approximately that time that we heard the first shot, and we had already rounded the corner, of course, when we heard the first shot. We were approximately half a block on Houston Street…as we heard the first shot, I believe it was Tom Dillard from Dallas News who made some remark as to that sounding like a firecracker, and it could have been somebody else who said that. But someone else did speak up and make that comment and before he actually finished the sentence we heard the other two shots. …We were still moving slowly, and after the third shot the second two shots seemed much closer together than the first shot, than they were to the first shot.” (Oral history interview for the Sixth Floor Museum, 11-22-93) “And we had already made the turn as this was taking place and we heard the first shot...which put our car directly facing the Book Depository… We heard the first shot. Tom Dillard and I looked at each other. I think both of us, you know, the first thing we thought was it could be a gun. Then, we heard two more shots closer together, over a total span of about eight seconds maximum. I think we both realized that it was a rifle or a gun, not a backfire, especially after we heard the next two shots." (4-1-03 interview conducted for President Kennedy Has Been Shot, 2003) “I had unloaded the camera, put the film in an envelope, and as we turned the corner onto Houston I tossed the envelope out to a reporter. And that's when we heard the first shot, and then two more shots, closer together.” (NBC program JFK 50: Eyewitness to History, broadcast 11-16-13) (On what happened when he threw an envelope holding film to Jim Featherstone at the corner of Houston and Main) "The wind caught the envelope and he had to chase it and we were laughing, and I remember that was when the very first shot, and then two more." (On what happened after the shooting) "I looked straight up--that's where the sound came from--and saw the rifle on the window ledge as it was being brought in...I looked up there and immediately it was brought in."

Edited by Pat Speer
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