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Steve Thomas

Revolt of the Colonels?

70 posts in this topic

Thomas

its an amazing document. Thanks for posting it. 

 

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On 2/21/2017 at 4:53 PM, Steve Thomas said:

iPad difficulties. Nothing to see here.

Edited by Michael Clark

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To keep this in the proper time-frame, my understanding is that the Army's involvement in this extensive domestic surveillance program was initiated under OPPLAN 100-68, in response to an Executive Directive from President Johnson as a response to the nationwide race riots and violence of 1965-1967, beginning with Watts. This led to a number of joint Army, Police and FBI intelligence projects such as Lantern Spike (which involved the 111 MIG, another regional group) - the FBI also dramatically expanded its Contelpro program under that directive. For more on the FBI part I would recommend Spying on America by James Davis. Several of the Army programs were carried out under the auspices of the Army Security Command and Army Intelligence - especially when Civil Disorder Operations were ordered around specific events and cities.

If you all find a reference to it starting in advance of that time frame I'd really like to know so please post it...thanks

 

 

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Larry - your time frame probably makes sense, at least officially. But in 1963 the 488th reserve intelligence was up to something. Too many links to the motorcade and the DPD

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I'll leave that to you all Paul, I was just trying to provide reference information. I will say that if  you go through the 112th references I have mentioned before you will find that there was a very active link between regional Army intel ie the 112th and the DPD intel folks on a regular basis, well before the Texas trip. Ditto between both them and the FBI because of weapons thefts and even simpe matters like security background checks.

I spoke at length with one reserve DPD officer who described to me that the DPD routinely monitored locations known to be homosexual hangouts, made lists of names and provided them to FBI and the Army if military personnel were involved - just SOP, nobody thought anything about it in those times.  It was assumed that homosexuals could be blackmailed and were therefore security risks.

You also find a number of former Army officers and reserve/guard officers on the DPD itself - not too unusual for law enforcement in general.

Of course that was the status quo, which does not mean there was not something truly anomalous going on around to JFKs visit.

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Posted (edited)

On 2/21/2017 at 4:53 PM, Steve Thomas said:

iPad issue. Nothing here

Edited by Michael Clark

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On 2/12/2017 at 1:16 PM, Steve Thomas said:

Over the years, a number of groups, or at least rogue elements of those groups have been floated as suspects in the assassination of JFK. These have included the CIA, the mob, the right wing, etc. However, I believe that there was another group of people who seem to appear in key circumstances associated with this event; and these are colonels in the U.S. Army Reserves, and more specifically the intelligence services of that military mileau. 
 

These Reservists include among others:

Jack A. Crichton,

George L. Whitmeyer,

George Lumpkin

,Lester Logue.

L. Robert Castorr, and I'll float another name;

Colonel Frank M. (Maryan) "Brandy" Brandstetter

I guess I'd add another name:

 

Colonel Lawrence Orlov.

 

Accompanied George DeMohrenschildt to meet the Oswalds for the first time in the Fall of 1962.

A Record from Mary's Database:

Record: ORLOV, LAWRENCE COL.

https://www.maryferrell.org/php/marysdb.php?id=7127

Dallas oil man. Friend of George deMohrenschildt. Orlov and deMohrenschildt went to Ft. Worth in 1962 to call on the Oswalds.

 

It's funny how a lot of these Colonels seem to be in the oil industry: Crichton, Logue, Castorr, Orlov.

 

Steve Thomas

 

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I spoke at length with one reserve DPD officer who described to me that the DPD routinely monitored locations known to be homosexual hangouts, made lists of names and provided them to FBI and the Army if military personnel were involved - just SOP, nobody thought anything about it in those times.  It was assumed that homosexuals could be blackmailed and were therefore security risks.

Speaking of which, was Edwin Walker never called on this during his service career?  (That would be pre-DPD, of course.)

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An Inventory of Texas State Guard/Texas Defense Guard/Texas State Guard Reserve Corps Records at the Texas State Archives, 1938-1983, undated (bulk 1941-1945)

These records are housed at the Texas State Library in Austin.


http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tslac/30026/tsl-30026.html

In January 1958, the TSGRC was reorganized as follows: an Active Reserve, a Ready Reserve, an Inactive Reserve, an Enlisted Reserve, an Honorary Reserve, a Provost Marshal Section, and an ROTC-NDCC [Reserve Officer Training Corps-National Defense Cadet Corps] Group. As the most important component, the Active Reserve was composed of a Corps Headquarters, one Corps Radio Unit, six Defense Group Headquarters, six Defense Group Radio Units, 30 Internal Security Battalions (about half of them strictly cadre units with officer personnel only), and 12 Radio and Rescue Detachments, with a total authorized strength of 10,000 officers and enlisted men.

 

Members of the Guard would neither be liable for, nor exempt from, federal military service as a result of their membership in the Guard. Eventually 51 battalions were formed, each battalion containing a headquarters and a headquarters detachment, a service detachment, and a medical detachment, in addition to between four and eight companies. Up to fifteen air force squadrons, two battalions of field artillery, and several bands, were also authorized. In 1943 the 48th Legislature, by House Bill 585, changed the name of the organization to the Texas State Guard, and made a distinction between the active and the reserve militia.

 

Battalion records, 1941-1947,

 

They comprise the records of the 51 battalions of the Texas Defense Guard/Texas State Guard, plus records of the bands, unassigned companies, and air squadrons, 1941-1947. These records are both at the battalion/squadron level and at the company/detachment/flight level. The four Battalions in the Dallas area were the 19th, the 29th, the 35th and the 51st.

 

The 29th Battalion was commanded by Major E.M. Dealey.

E.M. Dealey would go on to become the publisher of the Dallas Morning News

 

Battalion records, 1948-1971, undated,

 

In addition to the quarterly strength reports, there are organizational files that include correspondence and memoranda, military orders (general, special, and field orders), reports of annual inspections, daily staff journals, battalion rosters, requests for reassignments, handbooks, etc.

 

Much more voluminous, however, are the strength reports and organization files of the Internal Security Battalions and Security Units of the six Defense Groups of the Texas State Guard, mainly 1961-1971.

 

The 1st Defense Group covered northeast Texas. As part of the 1st Defense Group, the 102nd Battalion comprised Dallas, Irving, Terrell, Kaufman

 

(For records on the 488th, or documents mentioning any of the people mentioned in this thread, I think I'd look at the records of this 102nd Battalion).

 

Administrative records, 1940-1983, undated (bulk 1948-1983),

Types of records in these files include correspondence and memoranda; bulletins and circulars; articles; legislation and regulations; tables of organization; general orders and special orders; handbooks/manuals; station lists; assignment rosters

 

Chronological files, 1941-1969

These records consist of chronological files dating 1941-1969. They include general and special orders from the Adjutant General's Department and the Texas Defense Guard/Texas State Guard/Texas State Guard Reserve Corps; memoranda, circulars, and bulletins; chief of staff assignments and assistant chief of staff assignments (i.e., personnel assignments authorized by Col. Donald W. Peacock and Col. Weldon M. Swenson, respectively); station lists; and miscellaneous other records, for 1941-1969.

 

Conferences

Dallas Area Conference, [1963]

 

Texas State Guard Association officers rosters, minutes, and programs; anti-communist publications; logs; (It makes sense to me that some, or all, of these people would have joined the Association).

 

Steve Thomas

 

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