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Yes, Oswald was an Intelligence agent


Jim Hargrove
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https://www.yahoo.com/news/former-u-s-intelligence-official-russia-has-turned-trump-into-unwitting-asset-172058187.html

This link is not political in any way. I have often wondered how the CIA may have classified someone such as Oswald. If you read this short article I think it may offer some insight into how Oswald was drawn into the agency and then into a conspiracy. I do find it amazing how quickly and easily our government officials can connect the dots and promote the idea of a "conspiracy" when our national interests are threatened.

Craig C.

Edited by Craig Carvalho
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I have to say I think this whole line of inquiry, or attack, is propaganda. Gorbachev has made some public comments recently about how dangerous the situation between Russia and the U.S. has become. I agree. Since most of us here have read Jfk's correspondence with Krushchev, or at least read about it, imagine what President Kennedy would do now. The Dems have nothing peaceful to say, and Trump at least has one thing right - that our common enemy is Isis. Well, you might start to think that Isis isn't really our enemy, unless we need one during any given news cycle. Maybe it's our creation. I'm pretty sure from all I've read that we helped create the Syrian opposition which Assad and the Russians are currently bombing.

Here is another thing to ponder: where the hell is the CIA? Whatever they are doing, we don't know about it for the most part. I think Americans are being fooled by the lack of news into thinking its some kind of irrelevant historical dinosaur. I'm sure it's not.

So when it comes to wikileaks, Russian spies, unwitting agents, I think a healthy dose of skepticism is called for.

Gorbachev suggests the biggest mistake was the US pulling out of talks with Russia. Can't either side demonize the other without too much difficulty? Isn't this the same old divide and conquer, strategy of tension, mechanism of control of money and both human and natural resources that the 'power elites' on both sides have been using forever?

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Tommy,
Do you really think these two men look "almost identical" and have an "uncanny resemblance?"
WebsterandOswald.jpg?dl=0
I don't see it at all.
What do other people think?

Dear Jim,

Not sure which photo you tried to post because they don't "show up."

Did you test the link [WebsterandOswald.jpg?dl=0] after you posted it here?

-- Tommy :sun

PS -- I don't remember saying "uncanny resemblance," but maybe I did.

lee-harvey-oswald1.jpg

Pict_statesecret_ch1_websterreturn.jpg

OswaldWebster.jpg

One of the problems for the research community over the years is the fact that John Armstrong misinterpreted the incorrect descriptions of Lee Harvey Oswald that were intentionally put in "marked cards" to catch "Popov's Mole" (starting in early 1960), and the Mexico City Impersonator (starting in October, 1963).

Armstrong evidently thought these different descriptions of Oswald in the government's documents indicated that there had been more than one Oswald running around from at least when LHO "defected" to the U.S.S.R. in late 1959.

Dear Jim,

To answer your question, I guess Webster and LHO looked sufficiently alike for Marina to confuse them in her memory.

And for the CIA to base a big-time "marked card" operation upon them.

-- Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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I think they could look similar if they put a little effort into it. But I have a hard time with the Marina story getting them confused in her Russian memories. Is there supporting evidence for Webster's claim that he met Marina, other than Marina saying she thought her husband worked for the Rand Corp when he came to Russia?

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Is there supporting evidence for Webster's claim that he met Marina, other than Marina saying she thought her husband worked for the Rand Corp when he came to Russia?

Paul, There might be information we could glean from whatever the CIA files exist on Webster and Marina. If Webster told his debriefers about Marina, and he normally would if he were part of an operation, then we might have something. I haven't looked into it yet and can't at the moment but someone should take a look at it.

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I asked this question earlier and no one responded.

If Oswald was working for any intelligence agency, how could he not feel that for whatever he was doing for them he was outrageously under compensated?

I mean from as far back as his arrival from Russia to here in the states he was constantly struggling to support his family.

He moved them from one apartment to another in lower middle class areas. They never had a car and had to depend on others for any need requiring being driven.

Oswald couldn't afford to get his wife's teeth fixed. The White Russians finally brought Marina some nice clothes to wear. Ruth Pain had to drive Marina and her child back to Fort Worth. Ruth Paine made a comment that she had to spend quite a bit extra on food for them.

Marina obviously was very unhappy and resentful and even humiliated living in such a poor and dependent life situation.

It is clear this poverty existence created much friction and arguments and unhappiness in Oswald's marriage. I believe Oswald felt bad that he wasn't providing for his children.

If I was in Oswald's place and working for some powerful agencies, I would demand they provide me with better financial compensation than one step above homelessness.

How do those who propose that Oswald was working for powerful, financially well off agencies explain this poverty stress Oswald and his family went through up to 11,22,1963? That doesn't seem like a logical way to keep the loyalty of employees.

Edited by Joe Bauer
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I think they could look similar if they put a little effort into it. But I have a hard time with the Marina story getting them confused in her Russian memories. Is there supporting evidence for Webster's claim that he met Marina, other than Marina saying she thought her husband worked for the Rand Corp when he came to Russia?

Paul.

IDK.

But let me ask you. If it were true, would you expect to find "supporting evidence" for Webster's claim?

You do know that Marina allegedly told a friend of hers that her American husband had worked for an American exhibition in Moscow in 1959, don't you? But also that he worked in some kind of factory in Minsk?

And that Webster told Dick Russell in 1997 that he had met Marina in Russia in 1959, and that she spoke Russian "Mandarin Chinese" pretty well at that time?

I'm starting to wonder, though, whether Marina didn't meet Webster, and that LHO lied to her when they first met and said he had worked at an American exhibition in Moscow, thereby reinforcing the CIA's "marked card" operation which intentionally mixed and merged Webster's identity with Oswald's. And that Marina believed him.

Regardless, so that you can do your own "research" in the future on questions like this, here are a few hints:

Google Search: webster moscow exhibition marina . That will take you to Simpich's State Secret Chapter 1, and all the other websites that talk about this very issue.

Once on Simpich's Chapter 1, press F and ctrl at the same time and type the word "exhibition" in the little drop-down search box. (Doing so will highlight the word "exhibition" in the text for you, making that subject or issue very easy to find in the longish text.)

There. See how easy it is?

Just think! You, too, can be a "researcher," Paul!

-- Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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I think they could look similar if they put a little effort into it. But I have a hard time with the Marina story getting them confused in her Russian memories. Is there supporting evidence for Webster's claim that he met Marina, other than Marina saying she thought her husband worked for the Rand Corp when he came to Russia?

Paul.

IDK.

But let me ask you. If it were true, would you expect to find "supporting evidence" for Webster's claim?

You do know that Marina allegedly told a friend of hers that her American husband had worked for an American exhibition in Moscow in 1959, don't you? But also that he worked in some kind of factory in Minsk?

And that Webster told Dick Russell in 1997 that he had met Marina in Russia in 1959, and that she spoke Russian pretty well at that time?

I'm starting to wonder, though, whether Marina didn't meet Webster, and that LHO lied to her when they first met and said he had worked at an American exhibition in Moscow, thereby reinforcing the CIA's "marked card" operation which intentionally mixed and merged Webster's identity with Oswald's. And that Marina believed him.

Regardless, so that you can do your own "research" in the future on questions like this, here are a few hints:

Google Search: webster moscow exhibition marina . That will take you to Simpich's State Secret Chapter 1, and all the other websites that talk about this very issue.

Once on Simpich's Chapter 1, press F and ctrl at the same time and type the word "exhibition" in the little drop-down search box. (Doing so will highlight the word "exhibition" in the text for you, making that subject or issue very easy to find in the longish text.)

There. See how easy it is?

Just think! You, too, can be a "researcher," Paul!

-- Tommy :sun

' she spoke Russian pretty well at that time."

I reckon that's a pretty good assumption, Tommy. :ice

Edited by Ray Mitcham
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Did the Warren Commission Publish Oswald’s Intelligence Report?




[On June 18, 1962] Oswald walked into Pauline Bates' office in the Burk Burnett

Building in Fort Worth. He introduced himself and said, "I saw your

name in the phone book, can you do some typing for me?" Bates, a public stenographer,

asked Oswald what he wanted typed and he replied, "Notes I made in Russia of con­-

ditions there." Bates told him she would do the work for $1.00 per single-spaced page.

Oswald accepted her offer and handed Bates numerous handwritten notes.


Bates recalled that Oswald was very protective of his many notes, some of which were

written on scraps and pieces of paper and stuffed into a manila envelope. Oswald never

left Bates alone with his notes and took all typewritten pages and carbons with him when

he left her office.


Oswald sat in Bates's office for 3 days and helped her read the notes as she

typed. She remembered the notes reflected Oswald's account of his life in Russia where

he had worked 12 hours a day at a factory in Minsk, with no coffee breaks and no vaca­-

tions. He kept voluminous notes on everything, including the price of various foods

which he said tasted monotonous and were not very good.


On June 20, as Bates finished typing the 10th page, Oswald stopped her and

said, "Ten dollars is all I've got," and handed her a $10.00 bill. Bates offered to complete

the work and allow Oswald to pay her later, but he declined her offer and left. She es­-

timated that the project was only 1/3 complete.


Oswald then visited the Criner Career School, a business school located in the

Bewley Building in Fort Worth, and asked if someone could do some typing. Virginia

Valle was a former student who returned to the school to practice typing and shorthand,

and agreed to help. After a few hours Virginia had managed to type four or five sheets,

and Oswald gave her a small sum of money and then left.45


NOTE: The Warren Commission interviewed Bates but never gave her any typewritten

pages to identify as the work she produced for Oswald. They did, however, publish a 31-

page typewritten manuscript, with handwritten notations and corrections, on pages 287-

336 of Volume 16.


--from Harvey and Lee, pp. 395-396, Copyright © 2003 by John Armstrong



Many people here are no doubt aware of this document, but if there are any who aren't, it may come as a surprise. In an era before widespread communication and spy satellites, before personal computers and the Internet, it's easy to imagine how helpful to American Intel the information in this report would have been.


The whole Bates story may have been part of a cover story, but Oswald's lengthy manuscript is nevertheless fascinating. Here's the first part of Part I:



The lives of Russian workers is governed, first and foremost, by the "collective," the smallest unit of authority in any given factory, plant, or enterprise. Sectional and shop cells form a highly organized and well supported political organization. These shop committees are in turn governed by the shop and section party chiefs who are directed by the factory or plant party secretary. This post carries officially the same amount of authority as the production director or president of the plant, but in reality it is the controlling organ of all activities at any industrial enterprise, whether political, industrial, or otherwise personal relations. The party secretary is responsible for politiical indoctrination of the workers, the discipline of members of the Communist party working at the plant, and the general conduct and appearance of all members.


The Minsk Radio and Television plant is known throughout the Union as a major producer of electronics parts and sets. In this vast enterprise created in the early 50's, the party secretary is a 6'4" man in his early 40's -- has a long history of service to the party. He controls the activities of the 1,000 communist party members here and otherwise supervises the activities of the other 5,000 people employed at this major enterprise in Minsk, the capital of the 3rd ranking Republic Belorussia.


This factory manufactures 87,000 large and powerful radio and 60,000 television sets in various sizes and ranges, excluding pocket radios, which are not mass produced anywhere in the U.S.S.R. It is this plant which manufactured several console model combination radiophonograph television sets which were shown as mass produced items of commerce before several hundreds of thousands of Americans at the Soviet Exposition in New York in 1959. After the Exhibition these sets were duly shipped back to Minsk and are now stored in a special storage room on the first floor of the Administrative Building -- at this factory, ready for the next international Exhibit.


I worked for 23 months at this plant, a fine example of average and even slightly better than average working conditions. The plant covers an area of 25 acres in a district one block north of the main thoroughfare and only two miles from the center of the City with all facilities and systems for the mass production of radios and televisions; it employees 5,000 full time and 300 part time workers, 58% women and girls. This factory employs 2,000 soldiers in three of the five mainshops, mostly these shops are fitted with conveyor belts in long rows, on either side of which sit the long line of bustling women.


500 people, during the day shift, are employed on the huge stamp and pressing machines; here sheet metal is turned into metal frames and cabinets for televisions and radios.


Another 500 people are employed in an adjoining building for the cutting and finishing of rough wood into fine polished cabinets. A laborer's process, mostly done by hand, the cutting, trimming, and the processes right up to hand polishing are carried out here at the same plant. The plant also has its own stamp making plant, employing 150 poeple at or assisting at 80 heavy machine lathes and grinders. The noise in this shop is almost deafening as metal grinds against metal and steel saws cut through iron ingots at the rate of an inch a minute. The floor is covered with oil used to drain the heat of metal being worked so one has to watch one's footing; here the workers' hands are as black as the floor and seem to be eternally. The foremen here looks like the Russian version of "John Henry," tall and as strong as an ox. He isn't frilly, but he gets the work out.


The plant has its electric shop, where those who have finished long courses in electronics work over generators, television tubes, testing experiment of all kinds. The green work tables are filled high here. Electric gadgets are not too reliable, mostly due to the poor quality of wires, which keep burning out under the impact of the ususal 220V____ voltage. In the U.S. it is 110V.


The plastics department is next. Here 47 women and three physically disabled persons keep the red hot liquid plastic flowing into a store of odd presses, turning out their quota of knobs, handles, non-conducting tube bases, and so forth. These workers suffer the worst condition of work in the plant, an otherwise model factory, for the Soviet Union, due to bad fumes and the hotness of the materials. These workers are awarded 30 days vacation a year, the maximum for workers. Automation is now employed at a fairly large number of factories, especially the war industry. However, for civilian use, their number is still small.


At this plant at least one worker is employed in the often crude task of turning out finished, acceptable items. Often, one worker must finish the task of taking the edge of metal off plastic and shaving them on a foot driver lathe. There is only so much potentiality in presses and stamps, no matter what their size.


The lack of unemployment in the Soviet Union may be explained by one of 2 things. Lack of automation and a Bureaucratic corps of 16 workers in any given factory. These people are occupied with the tons of paperwork which flow in and out of any factory. Also the number of direct foremen is not small to the ratio of workers in some case 1-10, in others 1-5, depending on the importance of the work.


These people are also backed by a small array of examiners, committees and supply checkers and the quality control board. These people number (without foremen) almost 300 people, total working force 5,000 -- 3-50 without foreman.


To delve deep into the lives of the workers, we shall visit most of the shops one after another and get to know the people. The largest shop employs 500 people; 85% women and girls; females make up 60% of the work force at this plant.


Here girls solder and screw the chassis to the frame attaching, transistors, tubes and so forth. They each have quotas depending upon what kind of work they are engaged in. One girl may solder 5 transistors in four minutes while the next girl solders 15 wire leads in 13 minutes. The pay scales here vary but slightly with average pay at 80 rubles without deductions. Deductions include 7 rubles, general tax, 2.50 rubles for bachelors and unmarried girls and any deductions for poor or careless work the inspectors may care to make further down the line. They start teams of two mostly boys of 17 or 18, turning the telvisions on the conveyor belts right side up, from where there has been soldering to a position where they place picture tubes onto the supports. These boys receive for a 39 hour week, 65-70 rubles, not counting deductions. Further on, others are filling tubes and parts around the picture tube itself, all along the line there are testing apparatus with operators hurriedly afix shape type testing currents, and withdrawing the snaps that fitting out a testers card, pass the equipment back on the conveyor, speed here is essential.


The full text of this report can be read at John McAdams' website at this address:





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Craig - how would you apply the article to Oswald and the CIA?

Paul, IMO, the term "unwitting asset" says it all. Joe Bauer has raised some interesting questions. Attempting to answer his questions may help clarify this rather complicated affair.

As I see it, Oswald never knew or had any direct contact with any CIA "officials". His journey most likely began with ONI while in the Marine Corp.This assertion is corroborated by others who came into contact with Oswald both before and during his rather ambiguous defection which was most likely nothing more than an assignment, (dangle).

Nothing overly complicated was expected of Oswald during this period, and in fact Oswald did little other than report to work in Minsk, and spent his spare time chasing the local girls. He never showed the slightest interest in attending communist party meetings, which he had the opportunity to do. Quite strange for someone with such a strong ideological POV.

Some key facts to keep in mind are: Oswald never renounced his American citizenship. Secondly, anyone who wished to hand classified information over to the Soviets would never have told the U.S. embassy this beforehand.

Gerry Hemming, a well known and acknowledged former CIA asset, described meeting Oswalfd prior to his discharge from the USMC. Hemming believed Oswald had been briefed by ONI prior to his discharge. During an interveiw for the documentary, The Killing of President Kennedy, Hemming stated, "I thought Oswald had been breifed". By whom? Hemming: "ONI" Why? Hemming: "Because of the types of questions he was asking, and his obvious knowledge of my background".

Even the U.S. Consul in Moscow later wrote in an internal report that, "It appeared that Oswald may have been coached by someone or others...", "... he seemed to be using words he had learned, but did not fully understand...".

To directly answer Joe's question about "compensation", Oswald was never employed by the CIA nor was he on their payroll. This would have left a paper trail. There is evidence to suggest that Oswald was on the FBI's payroll, even though it would appear to have been little more than enough to cover expenses, ($200-$250/month). Oswald's relationship with the FBI may have taken on a more "quid pro quo" aspect.

That is not to say that Oswald was never rewarded for his actions. After all, it was George DeMohrenshildt, another figure with indirect ties to the CIA through French intelligence prior to and during WWII, who was able to get Oswald, a known "defector", a good job with a government contractor handling sensitive, classified, photographic materials. Quite a accomplishment to say the least.

It was Oswald's flawed personality that cast him and his family into poverty. He had opportunities, but rather than settle in and wait, I believe that Oswald found favor in the type of work/lifestyle that his outspoken political views could generate. Looking at the world we lived in in 1963 there were many avenues one could pursue, and amazingly Oswald appears on the scene almost on cue.

Oswald's failure at Jagger-Chiles-Stovall was probably more of a disappointment for those interested in him than it was was Oswald. But by that time there had to have been enough interest to go around. Enter the FBI. This interest intersected with two very important events in Oswald's life, the attempt on Edwin Walker, and Oswald's subsequent relocation to New Orleans.

It was from there, from an office adjacent to that of retired FBI agent Guy Banister that the FPCC was born. Surrounding this area of New Orleans sat offices belonging to most our countries intelligence community, including the ONI. In fact, Oswald was fired from his job in New Orleans for spending too much time hanging around a nearby garage where the Secret Service and other government agencies there had their cars serviced.

And what was Oswald's great accomplishments while in New Orleans... television and radio appearances. More specifically a televised incident involving an altercation between he and anti-Castro Cubans outside the International Trade Mart. And again a radio interview following the altercation where a rattled Oswald made an unintentional revelation. When asked repeatedly about his defection to the Soviet Union Oswald answered, "... at no time was I ever without the protection of the United States government...". A statement he immediately attempted to reword.

Another key fact to remember is that following Oswald's arrest in New Orleans, rather than pay a small fine and be released, Oswald requested an interview with the FBI and opted to spend the night in jail. Both of these requests were granted.

Was it only coincidence then that at the time of the assassination FBI agent James Hosty had two individuals at the top of his "to do" list... Edwin Walker and Lee Harvey Oswald?

Much has been made of Oswald's trip to Mexico City. I see it as Oswald's end game, or at least what he believed should have been his end game. All of these subjects I have discussed here in this post, IMO, amounted to nothing less than a resume, (emphasis on his attempt on the life of Edwin Walker), carefully engineered and manipulated by the government and carried out by Oswald ultimately for the purpose of getting him into Cuba... or so he was lead to believe.

This is were the government lied to Oswald, and this is when Oswald's attitude towards the government really began to sour.

One last key issue... initially Oswald's anger had been roused by the government's decision to change his honorable discharge to dishonorable. In fact, he wrote former Secretary of the Navy John Connally regarding this issue not realizing that Connally had already resigned that post.

Regards,

Craig C.

Edited by Craig Carvalho
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I think they could look similar if they put a little effort into it. But I have a hard time with the Marina story getting them confused in her Russian memories. Is there supporting evidence for Webster's claim that he met Marina, other than Marina saying she thought her husband worked for the Rand Corp when he came to Russia?

Paul.

IDK.

But let me ask you. If it were true, would you expect to find "supporting evidence" for Webster's claim?

You do know that Marina allegedly told a friend of hers that her American husband had worked for an American exhibition in Moscow in 1959, don't you? But also that he worked in some kind of factory in Minsk?

And that Webster told Dick Russell in 1997 that he had met Marina in Russia in 1959, and that she spoke Russian pretty well at that time?

I'm starting to wonder, though, whether Marina didn't meet Webster, and that LHO lied to her when they first met and said he had worked at an American exhibition in Moscow, thereby reinforcing the CIA's "marked card" operation which intentionally mixed and merged Webster's identity with Oswald's. And that Marina believed him.

Regardless, so that you can do your own "research" in the future on questions like this, here are a few hints:

Google Search: webster moscow exhibition marina . That will take you to Simpich's State Secret Chapter 1, and all the other websites that talk about this very issue.

Once on Simpich's Chapter 1, press F and ctrl at the same time and type the word "exhibition" in the little drop-down search box. (Doing so will highlight the word "exhibition" in the text for you, making that subject or issue very easy to find in the longish text.)

There. See how easy it is?

Just think! You, too, can be a "researcher," Paul!

-- Tommy :sun

' she spoke Russian pretty well at that time."

I reckon that's a pretty good assumption, Tommy. :ice

I was wondering if you'd catch that, Ray.

You passed that test with flying colors!

Thanks for not sending me a discrete PM informing me of your incredible powers of observation.

You've really "made your bones" here on the EF.

Now we're actually thinking about inviting you to Camp Perry for the indoctrination program.

-- Tommy :sun

PS I obviously meant to say "Mandarin Chinese."

Edited by Thomas Graves
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Craig - I gather you don't think Oswald ever met with David Atlee Phillips? Or that the guy with the scar over his left eye, seen with Oswald at the Carousel and possibly in New Orleans wasn't Phillips man - david Morales?

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Craig - how would you apply the article to Oswald and the CIA?

Paul, IMO, the term "unwitting asset" says it all. Joe Bauer has raised some interesting questions. Attempting to answer his questions may help clarify this rather complicated affair.

As I see it, Oswald never knew or had any direct contact with any CIA "officials". His journey most likely began with ONI while in the Marine Corp.This assertion is corroborated by others who came into contact with Oswald both before and during his rather ambiguous defection which was most likely nothing more than an assignment, (dangle). Nothing overly complicated was expected of Oswald during this period, and in fact Oswald did little other than report to work in Minsk, and spent his spare time chasing the local girls. He never showed the slightest interest in attending communist party meetings, which he had the opportunity to do. Quite strange for someone with such a strong ideological POV.

Some key facts to keep in mind are: Oswald never renounced his American citizenship. Secondly, anyone who wished to hand classified information over to the Soviets would never have told the U.S. embassy this beforehand.

Gerry Hemming, a well known and acknowledged former CIA asset, described meeting Oswalfd prior to his discharge from the USMC. Hemming believed Oswald had been briefed by ONI prior to his discharge. During an interveiw for the documentary, The Killing of President Kennedy, Hemming stated, "I thought Oswald had been breifed". By whom? Hemming: "ONI" Why? Hemming: "Because of the types of questions he was asking, and his obvious knowledge of my background".

Even the U.S. Consul in Moscow later wrote in an internal report that, "It appeared that Oswald may have been coached by someone or others...", "... he seemed to be using words he had learned, but did not fully understand...".

To directly answer Joe's question about "compensation", I would say that Oswald was never on the CIA's payroll. Nor was Oswald's relationship with the intelligence community on a "quid pro quo" basis. That is not to say that Oswald was never rewarded for his actions. We must remember that it was George DeMohrenshildt, another figure with indirect ties to the CIA through French intelligence prior to and during WWII, who was able to get Oswald, a known "defector", a good job with a government contractor handling sensitive, classified, photographic materials. Quite a accomplishment to say the least.

It was Oswald's flawed personality that cast him and his family into poverty. He had opportunities, but rather than settle in and wait, I believe that Oswald found favor in the type of work/lifestyle that his outspoken politics could generate. Looking at the world we lived in in 1963 there were many avenues one could pursue, and amazingly Oswald appears on the scene almost on cue.

Oswald's failure at Jagger-Chiles-Stovall was probably not only a disappointment for Oswald, but for those interested in him. But by now there had to have been enough interest to go around. Enter the FBI. There is evidence to suggest that Oswald was on their payroll, even though it would appear to have been little more than enough to cover expenses, ($200-$250/month). This was most likely concerning Oswald's stay in New Orleans where he spent much of his time in an adjacent office to former FBI agent Guy Banister, and just a short walk to the ONI. In fact, Oswald was fired from his job in New Orleans for spending too much time hanging around a garage where the Secret Service and other government offices there had their cars serviced.

And what was Oswald's great accomplishment while in New Orleans... television and radio appearances. More specifically a televised incident involving an altercation between he and anti-Castro Cubans outside the International Trade Mart. And again a radio interview following the altercation where a rattled Oswald made an unintentional revelation. When asked repeatedly about his defection to the Soviet Union Oswald answered, "... at no time was I ever without the protection of the U.S. government...". A statement he immediately attempted to reword.

Another key fact to remember is that following Oswald's arrest in New Orleans, rather than pay a small fine and be released, Oswald requested an interview with the FBI and opted to spend the night in jail. Both these requests were granted.

Much has been made of Oswald's trip to Mexico City. I see it as Oswald's end game, or at least what he believed should have been his end game. All of these subjects I have discussed here in this post, IMO, amounted to nothing less than a resume, (including his attempt on the life of Edwin Walker), carefully engineered and manipulated by the government and carried out by Oswald ultimately for the purpose of getting him into Cuba.

This is were the government lied to Oswald, and this is when Oswald's attitude towards the government really began to sour.

One last key issue... initially Oswald's anger had been roused by the government's decision to change his honorable discharge to dishonorable. In fact, he wrote former Secretary of the Navy John Connally regarding this issue not knowing that Connally had already resigned that post.

Regards,

Craig C.

Dear Craig,

LHO's altercation with the anti-Castro Cubans on August 9, 1963, wasn't outside the International Trade Mart, but two or three blocks away in the 700 block of Canal Street.

http://aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/wc/wcvols/wh26/pdf/WH26_CE_2895.pdf

-- Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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