Jump to content
The Education Forum

Olive Branches to Jeff Carter, & Robert Wheeler


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 266
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

On 11/10/2020 at 2:40 PM, Jeff Carter said:

While I assume Cliff was either drunk or overwhelmed by sentimentality when starting this thread

lol

 

Jeff, maybe Cliff is starting to sense you were right about Russia Gate after all and this is his first step in coming to terms with it?

On 11/10/2020 at 2:40 PM, Jeff Carter said:

4) Monopolist privately-held social media companies can now - without much controversy - censor, de-platform, “fact-check”, and prevent real-time discussion of current events, a dangerous spin into authoritarian models of speech which resulted largely from pressure by America’s liberal intelligentsia.

I agree with all of your points, especially number 4. This BigTech/BigPharma Medusa that has increased so much in power under the "liberal" pressure as you say, is to me the real long term threat here. The reality that the Biden faction is completely in step with that is stronger evidence of fascism than most of what Trump is accused of.

Even FoxNews appears to be not providing Trump supporters with what they believe is the correct narratives. Chris Ruddy's Newsmax is picking up a lot of those people from my understanding, isn't that the guy who started the Vince Foster garbage? Not good.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Dennis Berube said:

lol

 

Jeff, maybe Cliff is starting to sense you were right about Russia Gate after all and this is his first step in coming to terms with it?

Now now Dennis.  Just because I don’t believe in dropping the F-bomb any more doesn’t mean I won’t respond to staggering ignorance with my signature condescension and ridicule.

7 hours ago, Dennis Berube said:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/10/2020 at 6:48 PM, Paul Brancato said:

Cliff - thanks for the Punk Rock education, and especially Pussy Riot. 

I’m glad you’re enjoying the thread, Paul.  Pussy Riot is all-around great.  More of an eclectic collective than a band.

We have all kinds of music on this thread.  What are the chances of you posting some of your music, Paul?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cliff Varnell said:

I’m glad you’re enjoying the thread, Paul.  Pussy Riot is all-around great.  More of an eclectic collective than a band.

We have all kinds of music on this thread.  What are the chances of you posting some of your music, Paul?

If and when I figure out how to do it and what to share. No point in posting SF Symphony archival footage is there? 
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

       I was living in Providence back in the 70s when David Byrne and the Talking Heads started out at the Rhode Island School of Design.   (Their first big hit was "Psycho Killer," on the '77 album.)  And I used to go out and listen to punk bands perform at the Rat in Boston's Kenmore Square when I was in med school there from 1979-83.  In those days, there were a lot of punked out teenagers hanging around Boston's subways with mohawk haircuts, black clothes, safety pin piercings, etc.

      But, honestly, I was never all that wild about most of the cacophonous punk rock stuff, especially if it was out-of-tune.  I gravitated more toward the euphonious sounds of Bob Marley, the Police, U2, and Sting's solo work in the 80s.

      De gustibus non est disputandum.

      Here's the Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain performing the Talking Heads punk rock classic, Psycho Killer.

 

Edited by W. Niederhut
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, W. Niederhut said:

       I was living in Providence back in the 70s when David Byrne and the Talking Heads started out at the Rhode Island School of Design.   (Their first big hit was "Psycho Killer," on the '77 album.)  And I used to go out and listen to punk bands perform at the Rat in Boston's Kenmore Square when I was in med school there from 1979-83.  In those days, there were a lot of punked out teenagers hanging around Boston's subways with mohawk haircuts, black clothes, safety pin piercings, etc.

      But, honestly, I was never all that wild about most of the cacophonous punk rock stuff, especially if it was out-of-tune.  I gravitated more toward the euphonious sounds of Bob Marley, the Police, U2, and Sting's solo work in the 80s.

      De gustibus non est disputandum.

      Here's the Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain performing the Talking Heads punk rock classic, Psycho Killer.

 

Early 80's Boston Area Punk - one of my favorites

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Robert Wheeler said:

Early 80's Boston Area Punk - one of my favorites

 

Foo fighters like. Cool sound. I agree with W though - there’s a point where Punk becomes stupid and all sounds the same. 

 

Edited by Paul Brancato
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Paul, it does get repetitive.

As much as I don't agree with Jeff . I do think Jeff's response was much more real than Wheeler's music. Particularly since the Minuteman asking "What are we doing in Central America" and Wheeler voted for Bush interventionists policies in Central America for the next 20 years of his life. Obviously, just as a passing fad,  he was just playing out youthful angst against himself.

Cliff, Now it' time to put on your big boys pants and seek forgivance from Di Eugenio.

Ha ha ha!

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

      Since we're all interested in history here, I'm going to post an obscure Rocky Mountain footnote in the history of American punk rock.

      So, when I moved back to Denver in 1983, after living in New England for eight years, I was very disappointed with the local live punk rock and jazz music scene.  (Boston was teeming with punk bands and great jazz musicians from places like the Berklee School of Music.)

     But there was one punk rock band in Denver that was surprisingly good, in my estimation -- the Kamikaze Klones, from Evergreen, Colorado, (of John Hinckley, Jr. fame.)  I went to several of the Klones' performances at a local club called The Mercury Cafe in about 1983-84, (including a show where two of the band members were arrested in the parking lot for possession of cocaine between sets.)

    The Klones wrote songs like, Give Texas Back to the Mexicans-- a punk parody of Paul McCartney's song, Give Ireland Back to the Irish.

     One of the Klones later became a patient of mine, and told me the inside story of their rise and fall in the 80s.  Even at the height of their considerable local popularity-- which included one or two out-of-state tours-- the band never earned enough money to live on, especially since most of the money went up their noses.


      This low budget video, filmed at Denver's old Larimer Street wino district, (of Jack Kerouac/Neal Cassidy fame) doesn't really do justice to the quality of the Klones' live performances back in the day.

 

 

Edited by W. Niederhut
Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...