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Bob Dylan song about JFK assassination


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On 5/9/2020 at 9:01 PM, W. Niederhut said:

Interesting blog posts, Pamela, written with due dylagence.

I think you would find Sean Wilentz's book, Bob Dylan in America, quite interesting, especially with your experiences living in the Big Apple in the early 60s.

Dylan is large-- he contains millions-- and I'm amazed by people's differing perceptions of the man and his life work.

For example, you admire the Slow Train Coming album from Dylan' "Evangelical" period-- the only phase of Dylan's multi-faceted career with which I am unfamiliar.

And you disliked Like a Rolling Stone and Rainy Day Woman-- the first two Dylan recordings that I ever heard, over and over, on a Columbia 45 rpm in the 60s.

De gustibus non est disputandum!

As I recall, Rolling Stone magazine has rated Like a Rolling Stone the greatest rock song in history, and not without reason, IMO.

As for the rollicking "Salvation Army Band" single, Rainy Day Woman, from the Blonde on Blonde album, there is a terrific account of how it was recorded (in Nashville) in the Wilentz book. Al Kooper commented that "it's almost like Wilentz was in the room" during those all night recording sessions.

Thank you. I just ordered a copy. 

I tuned Dylan out because of Rolling Stone, as it was too powerful for me. I graduated Phi Beta Kappa, etc, etc, from Bucknell U the year before it came out, and found myself homeless on the streets of New York after an argument with my mother, so I took it personally.  I can still hear his voice screeching, "How does it feel?" almost as though he had gotten inside my head. I hated that. That was the final straw for me at that time.

Now I realize that any song that makes an impact like that is extraordinary. I didn't know that then.

I learned about Dylan through the gospel albums,  just last summer.  I prefer Trouble No More, the bootleg series, to the studio recordings, even though they, with Jerry Wexler's help, are amazing.  

I was blown away by Blonde on Blonde, and enjoyed reading That Thin, Wild, Mercury Sound...https://www.amazon.com/That-Thin-Wild-Mercury-Sound-ebook/dp/B079MJMCP9/ref=sr_1_5?crid=1GQDHEW9Z3YOD&dchild=1&keywords=that+thin+wild+mercury+sound&qid=1589164594&sprefix=that+thin+wil%2Caps%2C168&sr=8-5

 

Edited by Pamela Brown
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On 5/9/2020 at 12:27 PM, W. Niederhut said:

Good review of the flawed M$M response to Murder Most Foul at Russ Baker's Who What Why website today.

Nothing new for those of us who have read the DiEugenio review at Kennedys and King, but it is good to see another honest, accurate critique.

My only criticism of the piece is that they should have included a reference to the DiEugenio review of Murder Most Foul.

The article includes several links to archival Who What Why articles about the JFK assassination.

What Everybody Is Missing About Bob Dylan’s JFK Song

https://whowhatwhy.org/2020/05/09/what-everybody-is-missing-about-bob-dylans-jfk-song/

With all due respect, it seems to me that what everyone misses about Dylan is that he gives the impression of revealing when he is in fact concealing.  So you  have to know what to look for. In the case of MMF, coming so late in the game, and parroting things we as CTs have been saying for over 50 years, we need to ask what is really going on? Is something much larger than what his statements represent being concealed? Just my 2 cents...

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On 5/9/2020 at 10:01 PM, W. Niederhut said:

As I recall, Rolling Stone magazine has rated Like a Rolling Stone the greatest rock song in history, and not without reason, IMO.

 

Well, it's not surprising that Rolling Stone would pick a song about a Rolling Stone as the greatest rock song in history. IMO that song can't compare as rock and roll to "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction."

 

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14 minutes ago, Ron Ecker said:

Well, it's not surprising that Rolling Stone would pick a song about a Rolling Stone as the greatest rock song in history. IMO that song can't compare as rock and roll to "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction."

 

My vote goes to Jimi Hendrix's recording of All Along the Watchtower.  So many imitations during the past 50 years, but no one had ever played a guitar like that before.

Edited by W. Niederhut
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32 minutes ago, Pamela Brown said:

What Everybody Is Missing About Bob Dylan’s JFK Song

You don’t know me darlin’
You never would guess
I’m nothing like my ghostly appearance would suggest
I ain’t no false prophet
I just said what I said
I’m just here to bring vengeance on somebody’s head.
 

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8 hours ago, Pete Mellor said:

You don’t know me darlin’
You never would guess
I’m nothing like my ghostly appearance would suggest
I ain’t no false prophet
I just said what I said
I’m just here to bring vengeance on somebody’s head.
 

Good example.  Dylan is a false prophet.  Most of his fans will buy the fairy dust...

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9 hours ago, Ron Ecker said:

Well, it's not surprising that Rolling Stone would pick a song about a Rolling Stone as the greatest rock song in history. IMO that song can't compare as rock and roll to "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction."

 

I read somewhere that there may have been some sort of mind-control program based on the term 'rolling stone'...

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35 minutes ago, Pamela Brown said:

I read somewhere that there may have been some sort of mind-control program based on the term 'rolling stone'...

The modern rock 'n roll use of the term originated with Muddy Waters' song Rollin' Stone (Catfish Blues.)

The Rolling Stones borrowed the name from Muddy Waters.

 

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9 hours ago, W. Niederhut said:

My vote goes to Jimi Hendrix's recording of All Along the Watchtower.  So many imitations during the past 50 years, but no one had ever played a guitar like that before.

All Along The Watchtower and Like A Rolling Stone are great covers.  Can’t beat ‘em. These are three of my other faves...

 

Edited by Cliff Varnell
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29 minutes ago, W. Niederhut said:

The modern rock 'n roll use of the term originated with Muddy Waters' song Rollin' Stone (Catfish Blues.)

The Rolling Stones borrowed the name from Muddy Waters.

 

Well mah motha toll mah fatha.  Just befoe I was born. Got a boy chile commin.  Gonna be, he gonna be a Rolling Stone.  Inspired the Rolling Stones to take the name as there own.  Dylan to write a new, different version of it in 1965?  And Hendrix to appropriate that version, with Dylan's blessing?

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=muddy+waters+rollin'+stone&docid=608042101796375043&mid=DF01636CBEC9D1AA118EDF01636CBEC9D1AA118E&view=detail&FORM=VRAASM

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4 hours ago, W. Niederhut said:

The modern rock 'n roll use of the term originated with Muddy Waters' song Rollin' Stone (Catfish Blues.)

The Rolling Stones borrowed the name from Muddy Waters.

 

Johnny Winter brought him back to perform with this.  I bought it 4-5 years ago but never really listened to it until tonight.

https://www.amazon.com/Hard-Again-Muddy-Waters/dp/B00022GJ4M/ref=sr_1_1?crid=9CIK52I80WRB&dchild=1&keywords=muddy+waters+hard+again&qid=1589262491&s=music&sprefix=muddy+wa%2Caps%2C251&sr=1-1 

Led me to find this terrible video, but if you bear with it, classic performance.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=muddy+waters+johnny+winter&&view=detail&mid=6DD1BF1B891CC8DFF0DD6DD1BF1B891CC8DFF0DD&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dmuddy%2Bwaters%2Bjohnny%2Bwinter%26FORM%3DVDRESM

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